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Meat, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN' WICH® Meal

Our CROISSAN' WICH® is now made with 100% butter for a soft, flaky croissant piled high with fluffy eggs, melted American cheese, and your choice of savory sizzling sausage, thick cut smoked bacon, or sweet black forest ham. Meal comes in medium and large sizes. Your choice of Hash Browns and a Drink. Choose a protein: Sausage, Bacon, Ham. Choose a drink: BK® Joe Coffee, BK® Joe Iced Coffee, Minute Maid® Orange Juice.

Egg & Cheese CROISSAN' WICH® Meal

Our CROISSAN' WICH® is now made with 100% butter for a soft, flaky croissant piled high with fluffy eggs and melted American cheese. Meal comes in medium and large sizes. Your choice of Hash Browns and a Drink. Choose a drink: BK® Joe Coffee, BK® Joe Iced Coffee, Minute Maid® Orange Juice.

CROISSAN' WICH® Bundle

$9.99
Includes choice of four of the following CROISSAN'WICH® Sandwiches: Bacon, Egg and Cheese; Ham, Egg and Cheese; or Sausage, Egg and Cheese. No substitutions. Available during breakfast hours only. Choose a first CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®. Choose a second CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®. Choose a third CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®. Choose a fourth CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®.

BK® Breakfast Bundle

$14.99
Includes three Medium Hash Browns + three Medium Coffees + two 5 pc. French Toast Sticks + Choice of 3 of the following CROISSAN'WICH® Sandwiches: Bacon, Egg and Cheese; Ham, Egg and Cheese; Sausage, Egg and Cheese; or Egg and Cheese​. No substitutions. Available during breakfast hours only. Choose a first CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®. Choose a second CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®. Choose a third CROISSAN'WICH: Sausage, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Bacon, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Ham, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®.

Meat, Egg & Cheese CROISSAN' WICH®

$4.69
Our CROISSAN'WICH® is now made with 100% butter for a soft, flaky croissant piled high with fluffy eggs, melted American cheese, and your choice of savory sizzling sausage, thick cut smoked bacon, or sweet black forest ham. Choose a protein: Sausage, Bacon, Ham.

Egg & Cheese CROISSAN'WICH®

$3.59
Our CROISSAN'WICH® is now made with 100% butter for a soft, flaky croissant piled high with fluffy eggs and melted American cheese.

Our BK® Joe blend is made with 100% Arabica beans and freshly brewed to deliver perfectly balanced flavor in every cup. Would you like extras?: Add Cream, Add Sugar, Add Sweet'N Low ®, Add SPLENDA®, Add Equal®.

Choose a soda: Coca-Cola®, Diet Coke®, Dr Pepper®.

Make your morning sizzle with a side of our signature crunchy, golden Hash Browns.


Sours: http://places.singleplatform.com/burger-king-698/menu

Distance between Hamburg (HAM) and San Fernando (SFE)

How far is San Fernando from Hamburg?

There are several ways to calculate distances between Los Angeles and Chicago. Here are two common methods:

Vincenty's formula (applied above)
  • 6097.206 miles
  • 9812.501 kilometers
  • 5298.327 nautical miles

Vincenty's formula calculates the distance between latitude/longitude points on the earth’s surface, using an ellipsoidal model of the earth.

Haversine formula
  • 6089.005 miles
  • 9799.304 kilometers
  • 5291.201 nautical miles

The haversine formula calculates the distance between latitude/longitude points assuming a spherical earth (great-circle distance – the shortest distance between two points).

Flight Duration

Estimated flight time from Hamburg to San Fernando is 12 hours 2 minutes.

Carbon dioxide emissions

On average flying from Hamburg to San Fernando generates about 730 kg of CO2 per passenger, 730 kilograms is equal to 1 609 pounds (lbs). The figures are estimates and include only the CO2 generated by burning jet fuel.

Map of flight path from Hamburg to San Fernando

Shortest flight path between Hamburg Airport (HAM) and San Fernando Airport (SFE).

Airport information

OriginHamburg Airport
City: Hamburg
Country:Germany Flag of Germany
IATA Code:HAM
ICAO Code:EDDH
Coordinates: 53°37′49″N, 9°59′17″E
DestinationSan Fernando Airport
City: San Fernando
Country:Philippines Flag of Philippines
IATA Code:SFE
ICAO Code:RPUS
Coordinates: 16°35′44″N, 120°18′10″E

Related distances from Hamburg (HAM)

Popular distances from Hamburg (HAM)

Sours: https://www.airmilescalculator.com/distance/ham-to-sfe/
  1. Faux copper countertops
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  4. Black thug boys

GLENDALE, UTAH – There’s this magical feeling, and David Mickey Evans has experienced it twice.

In 1992, he was a director making his second movie, this one based on his childhood in the San Fernando Valley, in the days when you played with one baseball until you knocked the cover off, best remedied by wrapping it in masking tape. The story gave Evans redemption against the neighborhood kids who wouldn’t let him and his little brother play and against the beast named Hercules on the other side of the fence who gnashed his brother’s leg when he tried to retrieve a ball.

“I’ll turn them all into heroes,” Evans remembered thinking, “and make the ball worth $3 million.”

The first time he felt it was days before he began shooting that long summer, when the set was finished and he walked through a hole in the fence and into a three-dimensional dreamland.

The second time was Thursday, when Evans returned to The Sandlot.

He walked up a driveway belonging to a young couple, around a brick fence and back into what he once called a “little baseball kingdom.”

“Everything we’re standing near,” he said, looking around the once-forgotten field in Salt Lake City’s Glendale neighborhood, “is exactly where it was. Just on the money.”

For the 20th anniversary of “The Sandlot,” the classic baseball movie filmed primarily in Utah, Evans has shown the movie in ballparks nationwide. Friday night, the movie was shown at SpringMobile Ballpark after the Salt Lake Bees game, and on Saturday it was screened on the original field after Bees players conduct a morning clinic for kids.

At The Sandlot, Evans pointed to the new backstop, a careful recreation of the original, designed and rebuilt by a Hollywood production designer.

He headed for the outfield.

“That junction,” he said, pointing, “is where the fence went behind the Timmonses house and Mr. Mertle’s house. Then … that’s where the big tree was.”

Evans, an intense, lean man with sunglasses propped backward on his shaved head, shook with excitement. He was alone, gliding.

“Over here was the swing-set thing,” he said, before changing course and cutting himself off. “And this is where the kid was standing when the thing with the Electrolux blew up.”

Since the first tour stop in April, mothers have hugged him. One asked Evans to sign her baby. On this journey across America, Evans is beginning to understand the impact of the little movie he made on a million dollars and a barren field in Glendale.

For 69 years, Jay Ingleby has lived in Glendale. An avid baseball fan and collector, he has watched the neighborhood transform from one where returned soldiers bought two-bedroom starter homes to one commonly associated with gang violence and drugs.

For the past 14 of those 69 years, Ingleby has served on the Glendale Community Council. He’s the one who will remind you to water your lawn. He organizes district-wide trash pickup days.

He remembers a different Glendale than the one he looks out on from his modest house two blocks from The Sandlot. “I can’t remember the exact year,” he said, “but the shopping center was voted the best shopping center in the valley at the time.”

Council chairman Randy Sorensen remembers, too.

“Big piece in the paper,” he recalled, “said it was ‘the premier shopping plaza in Salt Lake City.'”

And near Glendale Plaza, which before it became the Dual Immersion Academy charter school served as the production offices and staging area for “The Sandlot,” was a Jerry Lewis Cinema. When the theater opened, Ingleby said, Lewis himself rolled up in a big, black limousine to give a speech.

“It was a big hurrah,” Ingleby said.

That was the first time the movies came to town.

By 1992, Ingleby had amassed a collection of baseball memorabilia. His basement is filled with autographed baseballs and bats and pennants. Name a star, he has him.

And when “The Sandlot” was filmed, he walked over and snagged an autograph from star James Earl Jones on an inside page of W.P. Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe, the book on which “Field of Dreams” was based.

As the 20th anniversary of “The Sandlot” approached, Ingleby wanted to do something that honored the movie, and also served Glendale.

“We get so many problems over here,” he said, “drive-bys, stuff like that, I would like to do something so unbelievable that is good, and bring to light the fact that this movie was filmed in our community. Our people should be proud of that.”

It’s a theme endorsed by Chris DeMuri, a production designer whose credentials include made-in-Utah productions “Touched By An Angel” and Academy Award-nominated “127 Hours.”

“It’s not always a bad thing when a film crew comes into your neighborhood,” said DeMuri, who oversaw the resurrection of The Sandlot. “Sometimes we build something that’s lasting.”

Ingleby didn’t know a project was already underway.

In a small building next to the Capitol, Utah Film Commission Director Marshall Moore, who owns a Benny “The Jet” Rodriguez Dodgers jersey, had long daydreamed about an anniversary showing on the field.

One afternoon in May, he pulled out a binder in which he kept his clippings and planning materials. He flipped to a newspaper article from three years earlier that detailed his aspirations, including giving the field purpose again, and hosting cast members.

Looking up, he said, “It’s really happening.”

The actors who played Tommy and Timmy Timmons will be there. So will those who played Squints, Ham and Yeah-Yeah. The Sandlot is a sandlot again, if only for a day.

“I don’t pretend to be an expert about movie publicity and stuff,” Evans said, “but I’ve never even heard of anything like this. Twentieth anniversary tour, going back to the original place, rebuilding the stuff, community gets involved. What are the odds?”

Everyone realizes this is a one-shot deal. Devin and Melissa Barkers bought their house on Navajo Street in February and, while they have been good sports about hosting a projected 1,300 people in their backyard, they worry about future intrusions. They have hung “No Trespassing” signs and, once the backstop and dugout are torn down, they will plant a garden.

Late Thursday morning, Ingleby pulled into the driveway. A film crew was setting up, this one from a local news station.

Ingleby carried a DVD copy of “The Sandlot” and a pen and set out to find Evans. But the proud Glendale native earned this one. He was among volunteers who raked up The Sandlot, and loaded branches and trash into the back of Barkers’ pickup truck. On Wednesday, once base paths had been carved into the field, Ingleby sprinted around them.

He wore a white “Field of Dreams” T-shirt with the famous tagline, “If you build it, they will come.” He put on an old glove and fielded grounders.

On one, he tripped and tumbled, then popped back up. Only when he got home did he realize he was sore. “You’re 69 again,” he told himself. “You’re really 69 again.”

But not at The Sandlot.

Sours: https://www.dailynews.com/2013/07/22/the-sandlot-based-on-directors-san-fernando-valley-childhood-turns-20/
Mega Tsunami (scenes from the film San Andreas 2015)

 Advanced Stats Glossary

* Non-scoring stats

Week 25 stats may change when stat corrections are applied on Sunday, Oct 3. All game times are shown in PDT.

Notes
Pre-SeasonPlayer's fantasy ranking based on pre-season projections
CurrentPlayer's current fantasy ranking based on stats filter selected
New Player NoteNew player notes in the last 24 hours. Click to view notes and other information.
No new player NotesNo new player notes available. Click to view other information.
Video PlaylistNew video highlight. Click to view video.
Probable Starter (announced for starting lineup)
Probable spot in batting order (based on announced starting line-ups)
Batter Not in Starting Lineup (may still play)
 
Player Notes
COVID-19Covid-19
DTDDay-to-Day
ILInjured List
NANot Active
OOut
SUSPSuspended
Action
Add Player
Add Player functionality is disabled
No more roster moves available
Drop Player
Player on Can't Cut list
Propose Trade
No more trades available
Trade functionality is disabled
Actions locked by commissioner
Add player to Watch List
Remove player from Watch List
Watch List is not available
AbbreviationWhat it Means
Batters:
GPGames Played
GSGames Started
AVGBatting Average
OBPOn-base Percentage
SLGSlugging Percentage
ABAt Bats
RRuns
HHits
1BSingles
2BDoubles
3BTriples
HRHome Runs
RBIRuns Batted In
SHSacrifice Hits
SFSacrifice Flys
SBStolen Bases
CSCaught Stealing
BBWalks
IBBIntentional Walks
HBPHit By Pitch
KStrikeouts
GIDPGround Into Double Play
OPSOn-base + Slugging Percentage
TBTotal Bases
POPut Outs
AAssists
EErrors
FPCTFielding Percentage
XBHExtra Base Hits
NSBNet Stolen Bases
SB%Stolen Base Percentage
CYCHitting for the Cycle
PAPlate Appearances
SLAMGrand Slam Home Runs
OFAOutfield Assists
DPTDouble Plays Turned
CICatcher Interference
TotalTotal Standard Deviation
AbbreviationWhat it Means
Pitchers:
APPAppearances
GSGames Started
ERAEarned Run Average
WHIP(Walks + Hits) / Innings Pitched
WWins
LLosses
CGCompleted Games
SHOShutouts
SVSaves
OUTOuts
HHits
TBFTotal Batters Faced
RRuns
EREarned Runs
HRHome Runs
BBWalks
IBBIntentional Walks
HBPHit Batters
KStrikeouts
WPWild Pitches
BLKBalks
SBStolen Bases Allowed
GIDPBatters Grounded Into Double Plays
SVOPSave Chances
HLDHolds
K/9Strikeouts per Nine Innings
K/BBStrikeout to Walk Ratio
TBTotal Bases Allowed
IPInnings Pitched
PCPitch Count
2BADoubles Allowed
3BATriples Allowed
RWRelief Wins
RLRelief Losses
PICKPickoffs
RAPPRelief Appearances
OBPAOn-base Percentage Against
WIN%Winning Percentage
1BASingles Allowed
H/9Hits Per Nine Innings
BB/9Walks Per Nine Innings
NHNo Hitters
PGPerfect Games
SV%Save Percentage
IRAInherited Runners Scored
QSQuality Starts
BSVBlown Saves
NSVNet Saves
TotalTotal Standard Deviation
PosWhat it MeansWho is Eligible
1BFirst BaseOnly first basemen
2BSecond BaseOnly second basemen
3BThird BaseOnly third basemen
SSShortstopOnly Shortstops
CCatcherOnly catchers
CICorner InfieldAny first or third baseman
MIMiddle InfieldAny second baseman or shortstop
IFInfieldAny infielder
LFLeft FieldOnly left fielders
CFCenter FieldOnly center fielders
RFRight FieldOnly right fielders
OFOutfieldAny left, center or right fielder
UtilUtilityAny non-pitcher
SPStarting PitcherOnly starting pitchers
RPRelief PitcherOnly relief pitchers
PPitcherAny starting or relief pitcher
BNBenchAny player
ILInjured ListAny player on real-life IL
  • BABIP - Batting Average on Balls in Play

    Definition

    The rate at which the batter gets a hit when he puts the ball in play. The calculation for BABIP is (H-HR)/(AB-K-HR+SF). League average is typically .300. A batter with a BABIP of greater than .300 is typically thought of as lucky (though batters with above average speed often have BABIPs greater than .300). A batter with a BABIP lower than .300 is often thought of as unlucky though batters with below average speed often have BABIPs lower than .300. As a rule batters have much greater variance in BABIP than pitchers.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Unlike pitchers, there's no "normal" baseline for BABIP with hitters, as this can fluctuate greatly. A higher BABIP tends to mean the hitter produces a lot of line drives and a high exit velocity, which is a good thing for fantasy value.

  • CT% - Contact Rate

    Definition

    Contact rate (CT%) is the percentage of at-bats in which a hitter makes contact; that is does not strike out. The calculation is (AB - K)/AB. In the Major Leagues, the average CT% is ~75%. Hitters with 90+% contact rates are typically elite in batting average.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    CT% is highly predictive of a hitter's batting average. A hitter with higher contact rate most often hits for a higher batting average than one with a lower contact rate. When seeking hitters who can help your fantasy team's batting average, look for batters with high contact rates and a high number of at-bats.

  • FB% - Fly Ball Percentage

    Definition

    Percentage of fair balls hit in the air, excluding line drives (pop-ups, fly balls)

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A batter with a higher fly ball percentage will provide more extra base opportunities, more power, and more RBI.

  • Definition

    Number of fair balls hit in the air, excluding line drives (pop-ups, fly balls)

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    On average, fly ball hits result in extra bases more often than ground balls

  • GB% - Ground Ball Percentage

    Definition

    Percentage of fair balls hit on the ground

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A high GB% leads to a higher BABIP but lower slugging%.

  • GB/FB - Ground ball to fly ball hit ratio

    Definition

    Ratio of ground balls to fly balls

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Batters with an extreme grounder ratio have limited homer upside

  • GDPR - Grounded into Double Play Rate

    Definition

    Rate at which a batter grounds into double plays

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A batter with a high rate of grounding into double plays hurts his RBI and is often indicative of a player with below average speed.

  • HR/FB - Home Run to Fly Ball Rate

    Definition

    The number of home runs hit by a batter per fly ball.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Batters with a higher home run to fly ball ratio tend to hit more home runs, especially if they also have a high fly ball:ground ball ratio.

  • ISO - Isolated Power

    Definition

    Isolated Power (ISO) measures the power of a batter. The calculation is ISO=SLG% - AVG. Result displays the number of extra bases a player averages per at bat. An ISO of. 200 or higher indicates a hitter with very good power. An ISO of ~.140 will be roughly the league average.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    If you are looking for a stat that helps you identify power hitters, ISO is a great stat to use. However, it takes about a full season of data (500-600 ABs) to achieve statistical significance foir ISO. A rookie flashing a high ISO early in the season may not be as likely to maintain his level as player with multiple seasons with high ISO.

  • OPS+ - On Base Plus Slugging Plus

    Definition

    OPS+ is OPS normalized for home park and the league in which the player played. An OPS+ of 100 is the league average. A batter with an OPS+ of greater than 100 us considered above average for his league.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    OPS+ is an excellent indicator of a hitter's all-around value because it not only combines the measurements of a hitter's ability to get on base and hit for power, but it also adjusts (normalizes) for a player's environment (park/league effects)

  • P/PA - Pitches to per Plate Appearance

    Definition

    Number of pitches thrown to batter per plate appearance.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Pitches per plate appearance is a measure of a batter's patience and can serve as a leading indicator for higher on-base-percentage.

  • RC - Runs Created

    Definition

    Number of runs a batter has generated for his team. This stat measures a player's offensive contribution in total runs. It does so by adding the number of times a batter gets on base to his number of extra base hits and dividing this number by his number of opportunities.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A batter with more runs created is most often a valuable fantasy contributing in a number of categories.

  • SB% - Stolen-base Percentage

    Definition

    The percentage of successful stolen bases against attempts.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A player with a low stolen-base percentage may be inclined -- or asked by his team -- to attempt fewer steals, thus hurting his fantasy value. Conversely, a player with a high stolen-base percentage -- provided he is active on the bases -- will likely have more latitude to steal in the future.

  • SL - Strikeout Looking

    Definition

    The number of time a batter has struck out looking.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Players with a higher number of strikouts looking may be having issues identifying the strike zone and thus are at risk for producing a lower batting average.

  • TOB - Times on Base

    Definition

    Number of times a player has been on base

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    The more often a batter reaches base, the greater the chance they will score runs. Not recording outs also helps BA.

  • WAR - Wins Above Replacement

    Definition

    WAR measures a player's value across all aspects of their game (offensively and defensively) by how many more wins he is worth than a replacement-level player at his same position.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    By itself WAR is more valuable for non-fantasy purposes than for fantasy players. Players with high WAR tend to be more highly ranked in fantasy but because fielding is not used in most leagues, it is less useful than other advanced stats.

  • bWAR - Batting Wins Above Replacement

    Definition

    Batting WAR (bWAR) measures a player's value as a hitter only by how many more wins he is worth than a replacement-level player at his same position.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    bWAR is quick way to view the best hitters in the game. It does not account for base running, so players with the highest bWAR are not always the highest raanked players in fantasy baseball.

  • brWAR - Baserunning Wins Above Replacement

    Definition

    Baserunning Wins Against replacement measures the value of a player's base-stealing performance and their base-running in non-stolen base situations by home many more wins he is worth than a replacement-level player at his same position.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    BrWAR is a quick way to identify the best players on the basepaths. Players with a high brWAR are potential sources of runs and stolen bases.

  • wOBA - Weighted On Base Average

    Definition

    A stat designed to measure a player's overall offensive contributions per plate appearance based on linear weights.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Typically the biggest fantasy stars grade very well in this category.

  • wRAA - Weighted Runs Above Average

    Definition

    Weighted Runs Above Average measures how many runs a player contributes, compared with an average player. A player with a 0 wRAA would be considered average and a player with greater than 0 wRAA would be considered above average.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    In calculating a player's Wins Above Replacement (WAR), which factors a player's offensive and defensive value, wRAA is used to represent the player's offensive contributions

  • AVG - Opponent Batting Average

    Definition

    The batting average of all opposing batters

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Facing weaker competition increases the chances of success in ERA, WHIP and recording wins and strikeouts.

  • BABIP - Batting Average on Balls in Play

    Definition

    The rate at which opposing batters get a hit when they put the ball in play. Calculation is (H-HR)/(AB-K-HR+SF). League average is typically .300. Pitchers with BABIPs above .300 are often considered unlucky, where those below .300 are often considered unlucky.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Pitchers tend to vary less than hitters with regard to BABIP. Fantasy players should expect pitchers with BABIPs above or below .300 to regress to the mean over the course of the season. It makes sense to target pitchers with a BABIP above .300 as they have been unlucky.

  • ERA- - ERA Minus

    Definition

    ERA- is a park-adjusted and league-normalized Earned Run Average, where 100 is the league (NL or AL) average. Therefore, a pitcher with a 95 ERA- has a park-adjusted ERA 5 percentage points better than their league’s ERA.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    ERA- provides a good overview of a pitcher's value. However, because the data is normalized against the league and adjust for the pitchers home park, a pitchers value may stray from their actual fantasy value.

  • FB - Fly Balls Allowed

    Definition

    Number of fly balls hit in play allowed

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Extreme fly ball pitchers tend to have lower WHIPs but higher ERAs.

  • FB% - Fly Ball Percentage

    Definition

    Percentage of fly balls allowed

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A pitcher with a high FB rate is more likely to be homer prone.

  • FIP - Fielding Independent Pitching

    Definition

    Fielding independent pitching (FIP) counts only the events over which a pitcher has the most control: strikeouts, unintentional walks, hit-by-pitches and home runs. It excludes balls hit into the field of play. FIP is expressed numerically the same as ERA.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    FIP is a great stat for evaluating pitchers for fantasy baseball to see if they are due for a correction. A pitcher with a low FIP but a high ERA has most likely been unlucky and should be targeted.

  • GB - Ground Balls Allowed

    Definition

    Number of ground balls hit in play allowed

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Ground ball pitchers tend to allow fewer fly balls and therefore fewer home runs and hits that lead to earned runs.

  • GB% - Ground Ball Percentage

    Definition

    Percentage of ground balls allowed

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    The higher a pitcher's GB rate, the fewer home runs they will allow.

  • GB/FB - Ground Ball to Fly Ball Ratio

    Definition

    Ratio of ground balls allowed to fly balls

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A high ratio here can lead to a higher BABIP but typically lower ERAs.

  • HR/FB - Home Run to Fly Ball Rate

    Definition

    Home-run-per-fly-ball (HR/FB) rate is the rate at which home runs are hit against a pitcher for every fly ball he allows.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    A hitter with high home run/fly ball is a good target when looking for home runs. To find players with strong home run tendencies, look for hitters who have both a high fly ball rate and a high HR/FB rate.

  • IR - Inherited Runners

    Definition

    Number of runners inherited (For relief pitchers only)

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Preferably the closer enters the game with no runners on base.

  • IRS% - Inherited Runners Scored Percentage

    Definition

    Percentage of inherited runners who scored (For relief pitchers only)

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Relief pitchers with a high percentage of inherited runners who scored are not going to help you win your league. These pitchers may not have a high ERA (inherited runners are scored against the pitcher they relieved) but their inability to prevent runs in a high-leverage situation makes them a risky own, especially if they happen to be closers.

  • OBP - Opponent On Base Percentage

    Definition

    The on base percentage of all opposing batters

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Pitchers with high opponent on-base percentage will have higher WHIPs and are likely to have higher ERAs as well.

  • P/IP - Pitches Per Inning

    Definition

    Number of pitches thrown per inning

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    The fewer pitches thrown per inning, the more efficient a pitcher is. The more efficient a pitcher is, the deeper they can go in games, giving them a better chance at a win.

  • P/S - Pitches Per Start

    Definition

    Number of pitches thrown per start

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    If a pitcher throws an excessive amount of pitches consistently, their chance of injury increases.

  • RS - Run Support

    Definition

    Number of runs scored by a pitcher's team

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Pitchers who have strong offenses supporting them have a better chance to win games.

  • RS/9 - Run Support per Nine Innings

    Definition

    Run support per nine innings measures how many runs an offense scores for a pitcher when that pitcher is in the game.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    The better the run support, the more likely the pitcher will compile wins.

  • SLG - Opponent Slugging Percentage

    Definition

    The slugging percentage of all opposing batters

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Pitchers with high opponent slugging percentage are more victimized by extra base hits and thus are more likely to struggle with ERA.

  • STR - Inherted Runners Stranded

    Definition

    Number of inherited runners left stranded (For relief pitchers only)

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    Relief pitchers with a high strand rates help the departing starters' ERA. A high strand rate also indicates closer potential for set-up men asit demonstrates the ability to succeed in high-stress situations.

  • WAR - Wins Against Replacement

    Definition

    WAR measures a player's value across all aspects of their game (pitching and defense) by how many more wins he is worth than a replacement-level player at his same position.

    Why does this stat matter for fantasy?

    By itself WAR is more valuable for non-fantasy purposes than for fantasy players. Players with high WAR tend to be more highly ranked in fantasy but because fielding is not used in most leagues, it is less useful than other advanced stats.

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Sours: https://baseball.fantasysports.yahoo.com/b1/24359/9

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