Nvc inquiry

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My Situation Is...Who Do I Contact?I have an approved immigrant visa petition from USCISand my petition has been sent to the National Visa Center (NVC) for visa pre-processing.

National Visa Center (NVC)

Phone: (603) 334-0700
7:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight EST
Monday through Friday
(excluding holidays)
Email: Public Inquiry Form

I have an approved immigrant visa petition from USCISand the National Visa Center (NVC) has completed visa pre-processing and sent my case to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

National Visa Center (NVC)

Phone: (603) 334-0700
7:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight EST
Monday through Friday
(excluding holidays)
Email: Public Inquiry Form

I have been selected for a Diversity Visaand my questions have not been answered on the E-DV website or the Diversity Visa Instructions.

Kentucky Consular Center (KCC)

Email: [email protected] You must include your name, birthdate and case number exactly as they appear in the Entrant Status Check (ESC) website. 

I would like to apply for a nonimmigrant visaand I have questions that have not been answered on this website or on the website of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where I plan to apply.

National Visa Center (NVC)

Phone: (603) 334-0888 
7:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight EST
Monday through Friday
(excluding holidays)

Please note only English-speaking representatives are available on this line.

The NVC is unable to answer nonimmigrant visa questions by fax or email.

I have a J-1 exchange visitor visaand have questions about a waiver of the Two Year Home Country Foreign Residence Requirement.

The Visa Office 

Email: [email protected]

I have a J-1 exchange visitor visaand have questions about my pending application for a Waiver of the Two Year Home Country Foreign Residence Requirement.The Visa Office 

Online:  J waiver status
Email:  [email protected]and include:  the case number; the applicant’s last name, first name and date of birth; the basis for the waiver  application, and; a brief explanation of your inquiry.
Sours: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/contact-us/us-visas.html

Newsroom

On June 1, 2020, National Visa Center will no longer accept or respond to inquiries through mail. National Visa Center has modernized the way we pre-process visa applications. This has allowed NVC to streamline services to case parties and to U.S. Embassies and Consulates. Elimination of paper correspondence is the next step in this modernization.  This change will further help us streamline and provide better services for all involved. Thank you for your understanding.

Any unsolicited mail post-marked June 1, 2020 or later will not receive a response and will be destroyed. You will need to submit all your inquires through the Public Inquiry Form at https://nvc.state.gov/inquiry.

You should only send mail to National Visa Center if explicitly instructed to through an email, telephone call, or letter from National Visa Center. In most cases, this request for documentation will be for a case that is not processing electronically. If necessary for your case, NVC will provide you with a mailing address. Never send original documents to the National Visa Center. 

Tips for interacting with NVC:

  1. Visit https://nvc.state.gov for detailed instructions on processing your case and a variety of FAQs

  2. Use the Public Inquiry Form at https://nvc.state.gov/inquiry if you cannot find the answer to your question at: https://nvc.state.gov or https://ceac.state.gov.

  3. Do not submit repeat inquiries. Multiple inquires on a single topic will delay our ability to respond. Visit https://nvc.state.gov/timeframes to check our processing dates. Do not submit a follow-up inquiry while your case is within those timeframes. 
Sours: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/News/visas-news/nvc-correspondence-update.html
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U.S. Visas

If you don’t find the answer you are looking for in the FAQs, you can contact us in a few different ways:

Online (immigrant visa inquiries only): Public Inquiry Form
(Note:  the NVC is unable to respond to nonimmigrant visa inquiries by email or fax. Please see our Contact Us page for contact information). We ask that you make a subsequent inquiry only if you do not receive a response to your email within our published timeframe. Duplicate inquiries slow our ability to respond to you in a timely manner.

Phone (for immigrant visa inquiries only): (603) 334-0700

Customer Service Representatives are available from 7:00 AM to 12:00 midnight Monday through Friday, excluding federal holidays. Due to high call volumes, wait times may exceed 30 minutes. Many of your questions can be answered in the FAQ’s section of this website. You can see the current status of your case or make updates by logging into the Consular Electronic Application Center at https://ceac.state.gov.

Phone (for nonimmigrant visa inquiries only): (603) 334-0888 

Customer Service Representatives are available from 7:00 AM to 12:00 midnight Monday through Friday, excluding federal holidays. Please note only English-speaking representatives are available on this line. Due to high call volumes, wait times may exceed 30 minutes.

Sours: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/immigrate/national-visa-center/nvc-contact-information.html

U.S. Visas

Why don't you have my case at the NVC yet?

I am the beneficiary (applicant) and my case is at NVC. Now what happens?

How much are the fees for the National Visa Center's Services?

I am in the United States and would like to adjust my status. How do I do that?

I am adjusting my status with USCIS, what do I do about the fees requested by NVC?

When I filed a petition for my relative I was a Lawful Permanent Resident (green card holder). I recently became a U.S. citizen. How does this affect my family members?

I have been waiting for a very long time for my relative to get an immigrant visa. Now there is a family emergency and I need my relative to immigrate soon to the U.S. Can NVC help me?

My relative went for his interview for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Embassy, but was refused. Can NVC review this case?

My immigrant visa expired before I was able to travel to the United States.  What should I do?

I moved. How do I give you my new address?

What do I need to do to remove an attorney from my case?

What do I need to do to add an attorney to my case?

What do I need to do to withdraw a case?

How do I transfer my Immigrant Visa case from one embassy or consulate to another?

 

Why don't you have my case at the NVC yet?

When you complete a petition (I-130, I-140, etc.) for an immigrant visa, you send it to United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in the Department of Homeland Security for approval. If USCIS approves the petition and you wish to process for a visa outside the United States, USCIS will send you a Notice of Approval (I-797) and send the petition to NVC. It often takes longer for the petition to arrive at NVC than for you to receive your Notice of Approval. Please refer to the NVC processing timeframes page for the most up to date processing times. Once we receive your petition from USCIS, we will give it a unique NVC case number and send you a letter notifying you that we have your petition and what to do next.

I am the beneficiary (applicant) and my case is at NVC. Now what happens?

If a visa is available for your petition (or if the Department of State believes that one will be available in the next several months), NVC will send you, the beneficiary, a letter or email directing you to begin visa pre-processing with NVC. NVC will begin pre-processing your case by asking you to pay the appropriate fees in CEAC. After the appropriate fees are paid, you will be able to submit the necessary immigrant visa documents, including the Affidavit of Support (AOS), application forms, civil documents, and more.

If visas are not available for your visa category, NVC will notify you that NVC received your petition and will hold it until a visa becomes available.

How much are the fees for the National Visa Center's Services?

For current fee amounts for Immigrant Visa Application Processing, Affidavit of Support Review, and Immigrant Visa Security Surcharge, see Fees for Visa Services.

I am in the United States and would like to adjust my status. How do I do that?

When a visa is available for your petition (or if the Department of State believes that one will be available in the next several months), NVC will send you a letter asking what you plan to do. If you respond that you plan to adjust your status, NVC will hold your file until a USCIS office requests it.

Requests for adjustment of status are processed by USCIS not by NVC. You should contact the USCIS office nearest you for adjustment of status information.

I am adjusting my status with USCIS, what do I do about the fees requested by NVC?

If you are planning to adjust status with USCIS, do not submit any fee payments. Notify NVC of your intent to adjust status and contact the USCIS for further information.

When I filed a petition for my relative I was a Lawful Permanent Resident (green card holder). I recently became a U.S. citizen. How does this affect my family members?

If you filed a petition for your spouse and/or children when you were a lawful permanent resident (LPR) and you are now a U.S. citizen, the type of immigrant visa that your family members can receive will change. When you become a U.S. citizen, you must submit proof of citizenship to the National Visa Center (NVC) so they can update your family member’s visa category. Scan and save one of the below items as a PDF or JPG file. Then send it as an attachment to Public Inquiry Form:

  • A copy of the biodata page of your U.S. passport; or
  • A copy of your certificate of naturalization.

Effect on spouses and minor children: If you filed a petition for your spouse or minor children (under age 21 and unmarried) while you were an LPR, the visa category was family second preference (F2A). When you become a U.S. citizen, NVC will upgrade the petition to an immediate relative (IR) visa category. This benefits your immigrating family member(s) because there are no limits on the number of visas that can be issued each year in the IR categories.

  • Important: If the family second preference (F2A) petition that you filed for your spouse included your minor children, now that you are a U.S. citizen you must file new and separate petitions for each child. This is because children cannot be included as “derivative applicants” on a parent’s immediate relative (IR) visa or petition. (This is different from the family second preference petition, which allows minor children to be included in their parent's petition.)
  • Children born abroad after you became a U.S. citizen may qualify for U.S. citizenship. They should apply for U.S. passports at the U.S. Embassy/Consulate. The consular officer will determine whether your child is a U.S. citizen and can have a passport. If the consular officer determines your child is not a U.S. citizen, the child must apply for an immigrant visa if he/she wants to live in the United States.

Effect on adult children: If you filed a petition for your unmarried adult children (age 21 or older) when you were an LPR, NVC will change the visa category from family second preference (F2B) to family first preference (F1). However, under a federal law called the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA), visa applicants can “opt out” of conversion to the F1 visa category and remain an F2B visa applicant. This may be beneficial because sometimes the wait time for an F2B visa is shorter than the wait time for an F1 visa. When you naturalize and become a U.S. citizen, you should check the Visa Bulletin to see if it would be helpful for your adult unmarried child to remain in the F2B category. (Applicants keep the priority date of their F2B petition when it converts to the F1 visa category.) Applicants who want to opt-out of conversion to the F1 category must submit a request using these guidelines:

  • Applicants whose case is at NVC should submit requests using NVC’s online inquiry form. NVC will forward the request to USCIS and change the visa category back to F2B upon receipt of USCIS’s approval.
  • Applicants whose case is at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate overseas should ask the embassy to submit a request on their behalf. The consular officer will forward the request and adjudicate the visa application in the F2B category only upon receipt of USCIS’s approval.

Please note that the process to apply for a visa does not differ between the F2B and F1 categories. Visa applicants still need to pay the required fees, complete a visa application, and submit the required civil and financial documents. The only difference is in when their priority date becomes “current,” which is what allows a consular officer to adjudicate and issue an immigrant visa.

I have been waiting for a very long time for my relative to get an immigrant visa. Now there is a family emergency and I need my relative to immigrate soon to the U.S. Can NVC help me?

If a visa is available for your relative’s category, and their case involves a life or death medical emergency, processing of your case may be expedited. To request a review for expedite, please submit a scanned letter (or statement) to [email protected] from a physician (or medical facility). The letter must include the physician’s (or medical facility’s) contact information, and declare a life or death medical emergency exists.

Please make sure to include your case or receipt number on the subject line along with at least one of the of the following:

  • Petitioner’s name and date of birth
  • Beneficiary’s name and date of birth
  • Invoice ID number

If a visa is not available, unfortunately there is nothing that NVC can do to expedite the petition. Immigrant visa processing is governed by the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended, which controls availability of visas. There is no provision within the law that would allow the Department of State to issue a visa to someone for whom a visa is unavailable.

My relative went for his interview for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Embassy, but was refused. Can NVC review this case?

No, NVC cannot change a visa decision. You should contact the U.S. consular office where the visa case was processed.

My immigrant visa expired before I was able to travel to the United States.  What should I do?

You should contact the Immigrant Visa Unit of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate that issued your visa.  You do not need to file a new petition with USCIS, but you may need to submit a new application (DS-260) and pay another immigrant visa application processing fee.  In addition, you may need to submit new supporting documents, such as a new medical examination and police certificate.  Please be prepared to return your unused, expired visa and visa package (if applicable).  Requests to reissue or replace visas are considered on a case-by-case basis, and all applicants are required to re-establish their eligibility;  there is no guarantee that you will receive a new visa.

I moved. How do I give you my new address?

Please provide your new address using our Public Inquiry Form. Don’t forget to let NVC know if your phone number or e-mail address change, too.

What do I need to do to remove an attorney from my case?

If you no longer want to be represented by your attorney, you must contact NVC in writing using our Public Inquiry Form.

What do I need to do to add an attorney to my case?

If you wish to hire an attorney, please submit a signed form G-28 Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative to the National Visa Center (NVC) using our Public Inquiry Form.

What do I need to do to withdraw a case?

To withdraw a petition, you must submit a signed written statement requesting that the petition be withdrawn and explaining the reason to NVC using our Public Inquiry Form. If an attorney or accredited representative submits the request, a G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative, must accompany the request.

How do I transfer my Immigrant Visa case from one embassy or consulate to another?

If you would like to transfer your Immigrant Visa (IV) case to another embassy or consulate, please follow the steps below:

  • If your case is at a U.S. embassy or consulate, contact the potential gaining U.S. embassy or consulate in writing to request a transfer of your case.  Please include a justification for the request.  If you are not a resident of that country, specify that in your request.  

  • If your petition is being processed at the National Visa Center (NVC), contact the NVC to request the transfer.  NVC will transfer cases to another IV processing post if parties provide a written request along with the address in the requested country and the proof of eligibility (citizenship/legal residency in the requested country or other documentation). This can be provided at https://nvc.state.gov/inquiry.  In limited circumstances, NVC may need to contact you for additional eligibility requirements.  Note that transferring your case might not result in immediate processing as cases are processed in order based on the date the case became documentarily qualified. 

  • If you are requesting a transfer for a K Visa, the receiving Embassy or Consulate has the discretion to approve or deny the acceptance of a K visa application from an applicant outside the consular district.  Contact the potential gaining U.S. embassy or consulate in writing to request a transfer of your case and include the reason for the transfer request.  If you paid the MRV fee at the original post and the transfer request to a new post is subsequently approved, a new visa fee will be required.  

Sours: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/immigrate/national-visa-center/immigrant-visas-processing-general-faqs.html

Inquiry nvc

News

By: Melissa Chavin

The National Visa Center is where family-based petitions are held after they are adjudicated by the USCIS and approved, but before the priority date on them becomes current and able to act on.  (This is true for employment-based immigrant petitions as well.)  The filing date of any immigrant relative petition (Form I-130) is the priority date.  It is one’s number for the queue of those waiting in various family-based preference categories, such as sibling of a US citizen, adult child of a US citizen, spouse of a permanent relative, etc.

While the petition waits at the NVC, circumstances may change, and the immigrant visa applicant may want to make the NVC aware of the changes.  The National Visa Center has done away with direct contact through its attorney email box known as “NVC Attorney.”  Instead, attorneys are asked to use their online contact sheet, called the Public Inquiry Form (PIF).  The NVC has explained to the American Immigration Lawyer Association (AILA) Department of State Liaison Committee, when they toured the NVC in person in November 2019, that inquiries by attorneys via the PIF will be funneled to the NVC Attorney responders in their Written Inquiry Unit. 

“Currently Under Review after Six Weeks” NVC Response

I have had mixed success with receiving replies from NVC Attorney since this change was made.  One inquiry made to keep a filing active has resulted in a type of “non-response response” with a simple, but ominous, reply of “The correspondence submitted is currently under review. An appropriate action will be taken once this review is completed.”  This reply was received after a wait of over six weeks.  No other reply has been forthcoming a month later.  I will likely need to send follow up inquiries.

NVC Successful Response!

A second inquiry made in mid-November 2019 had a better result.  (Names, year of filing, and country of origin have been changed for privacy.)

Sarah had been petitioned by her brother Jimmy in 2011.  Her US citizen brother Jimmy had designated Sarah’s home country in 2011 for the jurisdiction of her immigrant visa application: Australia.  Since that time, Sarah has moved to the United Kingdom - many time zones away.  Sarah is now firmly settled in the UK, with a spouse and two toddlers.  She has newly acquired British Citizenship.

Sarah hired me to (1) move the jurisdiction of her case to the UK, (2) add her contact information with the National Visa Center particularly her email address, (3) amend the email address for Jimmy, and (4) obtain immigrant visa numbers for the London US Embassy for her husband and children.  

I sent an inquiry to the public inquiry form (PIF) online with the National Visa Center in November 2019.  I included Sarah’s Australian immigrant visa number.  This immigrant visa number had happily been issued despite the fact that Sarah’s priority date is not likely to become current for at least six years, per the Department of State’s monthly visa bulletin.  

Having heard other attorneys’ frustrations with the NVC PIF, I decided to reduce the number of big inquiries to one.  I would ask only to change the jurisdiction of Sarah’s filing to get a new immigrant number under the London US Embassy, an “LND” number.  “LND” is short for London.  I included the following for Sarah in addition to my two Forms G-28 Notice of Attorney Representation for Sarah and for Jimmy: (1) a biographic data page of Sarah’s new British passport, and (2) her driver’s license with her UK address. 

About seven weeks later (including the winter holidays), a positive response was received:  (1) Sarah has been issued an LND number, (2) updates were made to all email address on the file and (3) I have been added as attorney on the case.  This means that there is an additional ability to get case updates from the NVC.  Next task: try to get immigrant visa numbers for the derivative family members for Sarah’s case, so that the family will be able to immigrate together.  Stay tuned!

Sours: https://www.chavinimmigration.com/news/using-nvc-public-inquiry-form

U.S. Visas

Number of Visas Each Year is Limited in Some Categories

United States law limits the number of immigrant visa numbers available each year in certain visa categories. This means that even if USCIS approves an immigrant visa petition for you, you may not get an immigrant visa number immediately. In addition, U.S. law also limits the number of visas available in certain categories by country. For limited categories, the availability of immigrant visa numbers depends on the date your petition was filed and the number of others waiting for the same visa category. The date your petition was filed is called your priority date.

Priority dates are posted monthly on the Visa Bulletin, which provides up-to-date priority dates for cases NVC is processing. Please note that while NVC attempts to contact all applicants when their visa number is available, you can also use the Department of State’s Visa Bulletin to check whether a visa is available for your petition. If a visa is available and NVC has not yet contacted you, please let us know by using our Public Inquiry Form.  

Important Notice: Termination of Registration:

Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) section 203(g) provides that the “Secretary of State shall terminate the registration (petition) of any alien who fails to apply for an immigrant visa within one year” of notice of visa availability. The petition may be reinstated if, within two years of notice of visa availability, the alien establishes that the “failure to apply was for reasons beyond the alien’s control.” Therefore, if you do not respond to notices from NVC within one year you risk termination of your petition under this section of law and would lose the benefits of that petition, such as your priority date.

Sours: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/immigrate/the-immigrant-visa-process/step-1-submit-a-petition/step-2-begin-nvc-processing.html

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