Shindaiwa 360 chainsaw price

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Col.Coleman

7th December , PM

Have been a huge fan of Shindaiwa products for years now, owning quite a few. The latest purchase was a chainsaw.

Was walking past the local cash converters and found a hardly used version and snapped it up for $ Filter was still wedding dress white. Now the is not available here anymore, but would compare to the , although the later is a pro saw.

I took it to Sundown where it got some unofficial use, but gave it a real workout today.

Now in the past I have had an and Stihl, the good ones, not the crap you buy today, so the is what I am comparing it to. These little suckers rev, and come standard with Oregon bars and chains. Mine has an Oregon Dual Guard 16" sprocket nose bar with a 91sg(now superseeded) 3/8"th pitch guage, " depth and 5/16"th file size. 30 degree angle and horizontal to sharpen.

It has a nice alloy wrap handle and is light and easy to use. Chain just bogs, not powerfull enough to kick and easy to use in the tree although the would be a whole lot better being a proper top handle arborists saw. I feel the would be better suited to a 14" bar. In saying this though, I managed to drop a 24" rock hard tree today, just took a little bit more time.

Up on the roof first, and took off all the greenery, then into the tree to take out all the sticks. kg of brush off to the dump. Then dropped all the limbs back to the trunk, and chopped for firewood. It was time to drop the main trunk. Not alot of room, but fell dead on target, missing the fence and sewarage pipe. No bounce, where it lays is where it dropped.

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

Don't care what brand of saw you have, get yourself one of these. Will take up to a P and 20" blade. Holds all your goodies as well such as bar oil, files, precision guides, depth guages, owners manual, stump vice and with the little saws you could squeeze in some earmuffs, gloves and front only chaps. You can even drop the bar and store inside if you want.

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg

CC


rick

8th December , AM

Good buy Col.

BTW, the Shinny box is the same as the Husky box (only the name and colour is different) and IIRC will fit up to a XP, but won't fit the Dolmar/Makitas from the PS up :(


Redback

8th December , AM

Col i have the and they still bog down under load, i'm thinking it may be suited to a 14" bar also, i had a couple of dramas with mine, turns out they aren't very flexable fuel wise, also the filters clog very easy.
The mixture has to be spot on or it will foul the plug or won't run, especially if you run a rich mixture, apparently it's to do with the new pollution carburettors that they use.

Mine is running well again, i just need to service it a little more frequent.

Baz.


weeds

8th December , AM

hey CC where did you get the carry box, i currently strap mine to the roofrack, need a beter set up for the high country


Col.Coleman

8th December , AM

The Mower Place Capalaba. $ Most places should have a version of it. The stihl ones have gone a new fashioned rounded design. Hard to pack.

The Shinnie distributer is at Narangba, handier to you. If they sell direct?

CC


mcrover

8th December , PM

Thats a great buy CC, and they are a good little saw.

The boxes are great and I would recomend the box like you have over the Shinne shaped box or the Sthil shaped box as they are much easier to pack in and they seal very well I have found in the past.

Most of the Shinne stuff will run at mixtures up to but no richer than that as the carbi cant be adjusted to suiteasilly but they last very well at and are very easy to re-ring and all come with a chrome bore so you will destroy the piston before you damage the bore.

Those domestic models do have a much smaller air filter and make sure you keep the foam filter clean and lightly oiled as the inner filter is not really up to it.

If it doesnt have the foam filter your shinne dealer should be able to get one for you.

Im using more and more of the Oregon stuff these days as Ive found the Sthil bars no longer have a lube hole in the sprocket nose bars and the Oregon ones do and I can buy a 20' roll of chain for the price of 2 24" loops of Sthil chain.

When I priced up stuff for Rangiemans Sthil saw I was able to get the bar and spur and half a chain for the price of the Sthil bar but im still not sold on the chains stayiung as sharp for as long as the Sthil chain but I just take extra loops out with me (or the boys do) and sharpen them when I get back to the shed.


hiline

8th December , PM

The boxes are great and I would recomend the box like you have over the Shinne shaped box or the Sthil shaped box as they are much easier to pack in and they seal very well I have found in the past.:eek:

if you look close you'll see its a Shinne box ;)


CC i have the shinne and its been a great saw :D:D

only problem being the big saws dont fit into the shinne box
they will if you force the catches closed (


Col.Coleman

8th December , PM

:eek:

if you look close you'll see its a Shinne box ;)


CC i have the shinne and its been a great saw :D:D

only problem being the big saws dont fit into the shinne box
they will if you force the catches closed (

Yup.

A , , P, P and P are all on the wish list. Bullets had a with him at Sundown. He works with saws all day long, and Shindaiwa gave them to him to try. They are NOT giving them back I was told. Unlike some other well known brand that was mentioned they were given and sent back.

I'm very happy with it.

CC


mcrover

8th December , PM

:eek:

if you look close you'll see its a Shinne box ;)


CC i have the shinne and its been a great saw :D:D

only problem being the big saws dont fit into the shinne box
they will if you force the catches closed (

Maybe I didnt explain myself properly.

There are the shaped boxes, which are the shape of the saw, Rangieman has one for his Sthil and Shindiawa made a similar one to that, and then there are the Shindiawa boxes like Col has.

Im saying that the one like Col has is the better of the 2 types but I can see where it was difficult to understand what I was woffling on about.

There is a box for the but it is the shaped type box, my old boss has one for his.


VladTepes

8th December , PM

What are the pricesof these saws and what would be an appropriate model for a bit of domestic use and taking on 4wd trips (would have come in handy up at Kilkivan the other day I can tell you!).


rick

8th December , PM

<snip>

but im still not sold on the chains stayiung as sharp for as long as the Sthil chain but I just take extra loops out with me (or the boys do) and sharpen them when I get back to the shed.

try Carlton. I'm using Oregon, Stihl and Carlton and the Carlton chain is what I reach for first if they are all sharp.
Blount (the owner of Oregon) have recently bought out Carlton and already changed their bars (they used to be made by either GB or lately Tsumura in Japan but are now oregon rebaged ) but so far the chain is still the same.
Carlton is wholesaled by GB and Jakmax.

GB make excellent bars, and they are made here in Oz.


mcrover

8th December , PM

What are the pricesof these saws and what would be an appropriate model for a bit of domestic use and taking on 4wd trips (would have come in handy up at Kilkivan the other day I can tell you!).

A company called Roy Gripske and sons is meant to be now the sole inporter I have been told and from them the dealers get them but I dont know how true that is as it came from their rep so there may be a bit of poetic licence involved there.

They are however based in Brisvagas I believe or somewhere up that direction so maybe do a search, I dont have the number here at home and being totally ohnest, I will forget by tomorrow to look for the number but I know Google finds them pretty well.

Try Power Turf Equipment as well as that is the branch that wholesales to the shops.

If you get in touch with them they will point you in the best direction on where to get the best deal but they wont be able to sell to you direct.

I dont know how much they are these days, the last time I got a price on one was for Hilinegeez that was a while ago and the distributor has changed since then.

They have a good range of domestic saws but I would be inclined to buy the smaller pro type saws as it will give you much less problems than the domestic.

The main differences between the 2 with the Shinnies is more just air filtration and the rings are made of different materials as well as some of the plastics are a bit different but other than that they are much the same.


Col.Coleman

8th December , PM

A would be adequate for most if unfamiliar with saws. Lowest size in the pro saws (ignoring the top handle) and will drive a 16" Pro-lite bar. You are into proper chain now as well.

If you use your saw ALOT a P would be great with an 18" or 20" if you want to show off. But in reality, what are you going to be cutting? A bit of firewood, maybe, and very few fallen trees.

The top option would be adequate. Remember, a 16" bar will drop a 30" tree, once on the ground, the 16" bar will be enough. You are not going to bother with massive trees, and if you are most are hollow once you get into them.

The most important thing is to be taught how to use it, AND SHARPEN IT. Avoid dirty wood and soil, buy quality files and a clamp on precision guage, stump vice and spare chain. Learn to sharpen on a newish chain first too.

I have the because that is what I found cheap. It will be my 4wd saw.

Don't know the price of the little ones but saw a P for under $ and a P around $ last week

Power up lawn equipment is the distributor (Roy Gripske and sons) and are at Nerangba.

I will bring my kit to the BBQ for anyone that wants to have a look.

CC


rovercare

8th December , PM

Sorry to say it, but I think the boxs are pox:p, They waste HEAPS of real estate in the car, I'm happy with a chain bar cover and pack aorund the saw

No real shortage of space in a though:D


Debacle

8th December , PM

Power up lawn equipment is the distributor (Roy Gripske and sons) and are at Nerangba.



CC[/QUOTE]

I cart a bit of stuff out of powerup occasionally and pretty sure they dont do retail, but will check it when i go there next.
One of their distributors on the northside is the mower shop next to the servo on rainbow st at sandgate if that helps


hiline

8th December , PM

Sorry to say it, but I think the boxs are pox:p, They waste HEAPS of real estate in the car, I'm happy with a chain bar cover and pack aorund the saw

No real shortage of space in a though:D

hell even plenty of room for my chaps :angel:;)


Redback

9th December , PM

I must be doing something wrong if i'm the only one having trouble with these saws:(

It's a great saw when it's going, trouble it seems to be stopping more often than it should:(

Husky make that chainsaw box too, only difference is the colour (orange) and the name on it of coarse.

Baz.


mcrover

9th December , PM

hell even plenty of room for my chaps :angel:;)

Geez carefull there Ray,

You cant mention Chaps on AULRO or else your likely to cop wise crack after wise crack about it for ever and a day, you will be called a tosser and even said to be weak and made out to be less than a man for wearing them.:eek:

Personally though, I would prefer to be less manly for wearing them than a fair bit shorter in height for not wearing them :D


VladTepes

9th December , PM

chaps are going to save you how ?


rovercare

9th December , PM

Geez carefull there Ray,

You cant mention Chaps on AULRO or else your likely to cop wise crack after wise crack about it for ever and a day, you will be called a tosser and even said to be weak and made out to be less than a man for wearing them.:eek:

Personally though, I would prefer to be less manly for wearing them than a fair bit shorter in height for not wearing them :D

When did you get called a tosser, weak or less of a man?


Col.Coleman

9th December , PM

chaps are going to save you how ?

Oh No:o:(:noThump:


Geez carefull there Ray,

You cant mention Chaps on AULRO or else your likely to cop wise crack after wise crack about it for ever and a day, you will be called a tosser and even said to be weak and made out to be less than a man for wearing them.:eek:

Personally though, I would prefer to be less manly for wearing them than a fair bit shorter in height for not wearing them :D


When did you get called a tosser, weak or less of a man?

Take it somewhere else guys

http://www.aulro.com/afvb/general-chat/cheap-chainsaw.html


I must be doing something wrong if i'm the only one having trouble with these saws:(

It's a great saw when it's going, trouble it seems to be stopping more often than it should:(

Husky make that chainsaw box too, only difference is the colour (orange) and the name on it of coarse.

Baz.


I read your thread Bazz, and think maybe the fuel mix you were using has gummed it up. When I brought this saw home it would not start for the life of me. Pulled the plug, cleaned and gapped it, put some neat petrol in the cylinder, dumped all the old fuel out, swished out the tank with neat fuel then refilled with proper mix. Pulled the choke on, locked the throttle on, 2 pulls, little kick, choke off, pull again and fires into life.

My Honda stuff is real sensitive to fuel. If it is stale it hates it, but still runs. All the 2-stroke stuff I have, non of it cares too much. Just get it real hot and burn all the crud out of it, or pull the muffler and oxy it just like a motorbike baffle. Have you thought of doing a plug chop?

I might resurect your old thread for further discussion.

CC


Redback

10th December , AM

Oh No:o:(:noThump:





Take it somewhere else guys

http://www.aulro.com/afvb/general-chat/cheap-chainsaw.html




I read your thread Bazz, and think maybe the fuel mix you were using has gummed it up. When I brought this saw home it would not start for the life of me. Pulled the plug, cleaned and gapped it, put some neat petrol in the cylinder, dumped all the old fuel out, swished out the tank with neat fuel then refilled with proper mix. Pulled the choke on, locked the throttle on, 2 pulls, little kick, choke off, pull again and fires into life.

My Honda stuff is real sensitive to fuel. If it is stale it hates it, but still runs. All the 2-stroke stuff I have, non of it cares too much. Just get it real hot and burn all the crud out of it, or pull the muffler and oxy it just like a motorbike baffle. Have you thought of doing a plug chop?

I might resurect your old thread for further discussion.

CC

At the moment it's all good, cleaned the muffler, has fresh fuel, new plug, new filter, i'll just make sure the mix is the same every time and give it a service every time i use it.

Going camping this weekend so we'll see how it goes, i will have a fresh mix of fuel and plug on standby, i have purposely left the saw sitting for 3 weeks to see what happens when i go to start it, if it won't start or it runs bad, then i know not to leave fuel in it for long periods in the future.

Thanks for the advice and no i hadn't thought of a plug chop.

Baz.


Col.Coleman

10th December , AM

I had a moment yesterday with my Echo shredder/vac blower. I pressure washed and serviced all my landscaping equipment on saturday and it wouldn't start afterwards. Thought it might be wet so left it to dry out.

Trying everyday and it still wouldn't go. Pulled the whole thing to pieces, covers off, the whole shebang, then realized the fan cover had been slightly open not engaging the safety switch. Pushed the switch in and it started first go.

There's an hour of my life I'm not getting back:D

CC


hodgo

10th December , AM

A mate of mine has a Husquvarna agency in a large Qld country town and is kept up todate with servicing / maintance and one of the main problems with petrol powered tools is ones that dont get used often and the age of the fuel used
Petrol today only has a 3 months self life and if old fuel is used in two stroke motors it can shorten the life of the engine considerably over a period of time . All lawn mower shops and dealers sell a petrol adative that extends the live of fuel by three months Its not expencive to buy and is reconmended by all the the mower sales people that I have spoken too .
hodgo


VladTepes

10th December , PM

Col Col whaddaya mean "Oh no" followed by several non encouraging smileys ?


Col.Coleman

11th December , AM

I wasn't putting you down mate, I could just see the thread degenerating into a mud slinging match because someone mentioned chaps, ala the thread I highlighted.

Now in answer to your question.

Chainsaws cut by small chisels revolving at high speed linked into a chain. Now every so often, these chisels hit something that make the chain stop. But the chain carries inertia, and the powerhead still trying to rotate the chain causes the saw to try to to rotate itself. Just like a stuck drill bit and a drill.

Now depending on which way you are cutting to what the saw does. If cutting on the bottom of the bar, downwards, the powerhead drops and the blade comes back at you intent on removing your face, because as the saw rotates it normally frees itself and starts spinning again. This all happens in a fraction of a second. When you are cutting in this manner, the chain brake is supposed to hit your hand and move forward and brake the chain. In theory. Depending on the size and power of the saw and blade to how bad this can be. More of either magnifies the results. Hence a face mask and helmet is recommended, as well as saving your face and eyes from swarth from cutting, or things falling on your head. Add in ear muffs to protect your hearing. Gloves and a vest are also a good idea.

Now if cutting on the top of the bar, upwards, the powerhead goes up, the blade comes down and tries to turn you into an extra for an Errol Flynn movie. Hence the recommendation of chaps and boots.

The chaps and vest protect you by being designed in such a way that if the outer layer gets cut through, it is filled with a fibrous material that will snag the chain to stop it moving and hence cutting any further.

The whole point of this is to protect yourself, as you never know when this is going to happen. It is more likely when you are inexperienced, using high powered saws, have been cutting for a long time and get tired, some tree hugging hippie has spiked a tree or whatever. Now it is not always practical to don all such epuipment but you must realize when you don't you must accept the risk you face if something goes wrong. It is up to each operator to decide for themselves, except in the case of OH&S where the decision has been made for you whether you like it or not to protect some organisation from being sued if you hurt yourself.

Saws are a very dangerous thing when something goes wrong, novice or experienced. Best advice is to suit up before you use, but ultimately it is your call. Respect what you are using, just like you would your firearm.

CC


rick

11th December , AM

I'm a wimpy bugger that uses chaps. :D
I like my legs the way they are. It's too easy to slip when limbing.

I use Kiwi 'Cloggers' ones that have a full wrap on the calf (velcro closure) and fastex buckles for the rest of the straps so you are far less likely to snag them on anything compared to a lot of brands.
They also come in an extra long version that I have so they actually cover all the way to your boot for us lanky fella's, unlike a lot of US ones that would be riding half mast on me (are Yanks short arsed or just short legged ?)
They're also green, not the poxxy fluro orange a lot are.


mcrover

11th December , PM

I wasn't putting you down mate, I could just see the thread degenerating into a mud slinging match because someone mentioned chaps, ala the thread I highlighted.

Now in answer to your question.

Chainsaws cut by small chisels revolving at high speed linked into a chain. Now every so often, these chisels hit something that make the chain stop. But the chain carries inertia, and the powerhead still trying to rotate the chain causes the saw to try to to rotate itself. Just like a stuck drill bit and a drill.

Now depending on which way you are cutting to what the saw does. If cutting on the bottom of the bar, downwards, the powerhead drops and the blade comes back at you intent on removing your face, because as the saw rotates it normally frees itself and starts spinning again. This all happens in a fraction of a second. When you are cutting in this manner, the chain brake is supposed to hit your hand and move forward and brake the chain. In theory. Depending on the size and power of the saw and blade to how bad this can be. More of either magnifies the results. Hence a face mask and helmet is recommended, as well as saving your face and eyes from swarth from cutting, or things falling on your head. Add in ear muffs to protect your hearing. Gloves and a vest are also a good idea.

The chain brake on the more modern saws also have an inertia switch built in so you hand doesnt have to hit the brake handle but if the saw is kicked with a set amount of force it triggers the sprung catch and the handle is thrown forward.

Now if cutting on the top of the bar, upwards, the powerhead goes up, the blade comes down and tries to turn you into an extra for an Errol Flynn movie. Hence the recommendation of chaps and boots.

The most common way that people injure their legs is either drop starting or they dont pay attention to where the chain is (normally when stepping away from the log with the chain still spinning) and nick thier leg.
If the cloggers/chaps were not worn, the chain tries to bury itself into the flesh and before it is normally realised that it has happened it has got to bone causing major damage to muscle and nerves etc.

The chaps and vest protect you by being designed in such a way that if the outer layer gets cut through, it is filled with a fibrous material that will snag the chain to stop it moving and hence cutting any further.

The whole point of this is to protect yourself, as you never know when this is going to happen. It is more likely when you are inexperienced, using high powered saws, have been cutting for a long time and get tired, some tree hugging hippie has spiked a tree or whatever. Now it is not always practical to don all such epuipment but you must realize when you don't you must accept the risk you face if something goes wrong. It is up to each operator to decide for themselves, except in the case of OH&S where the decision has been made for you whether you like it or not to protect some organisation from being sued if you hurt yourself.

Saws are a very dangerous thing when something goes wrong, novice or experienced. Best advice is to suit up before you use, but ultimately it is your call. Respect what you are using, just like you would your firearm.

CC


I do very much refer to chainsaws in the same way as I do firearms, safe in the right hands when used properly but when in inexperienced hands are deadly.

Ive just put an order in for so clogger trousers instead of using chaps, they are the same price as the Sthil chaps we buy now but I think much more comfy all though once you get the chaps set up they dont get in the way much unless walking through brances etc.


blitz

11th December , PM

Hey is that hoya growing on the tree you cut down?

I have a huski e love it althought I need a bigger professional sized one as well. Regarding safety, chainsaws are very bloody dangerous, I wear all safety gear helmet,ears, eyes, I dont wear chaps because I am an amputee and have that leg forward when I cut but I still wear at a minimum jeans, but am going to get chaps just to be safe.

Blythe


philco

11th December , PM

I have been using chainsaws for the last 20 years or so, both the electric and petrol.
Biggest problem is the kick back and have seen a few accidents,seen many photos and heard of lots of stories of guys cutting their heads and legs open from not using chaps or helmets.
I definitely dont think they are a wimpy or an excessive need.
I wanted to cut down a couple of big gums at the brother in laws a couple of weeks ago so went to hire a Stil ms from the local hire shop and was surprised they didnt supply chaps or even have any for sale.
After using chainsaws for so many years i have come to the conclusion they are the most dangerous tool in the world bar none.
I am never afraid to keep my legs in good condition so I always wear chaps.


harry

11th December , PM

I have been using chainsaws for the last 20 years or so, both the electric and petrol.
Biggest problem is the kick back and have seen a few accidents,seen many photos and heard of lots of stories of guys cutting their heads and legs open from not using chaps or helmets.
I definitely dont think they are a wimpy or an excessive need.
I wanted to cut down a couple of big gums at the brother in laws a couple of weeks ago so went to hire a Stil ms from the local hire shop and was surprised they didnt supply chaps or even have any for sale.
After using chainsaws for so many years i have come to the conclusion they are the most dangerous tool in the world bar none.
I am never afraid to keep my legs in good condition so I always wear chaps.

i have seen the damage in the first highlight above, and these guys were proffessionals with the safety gear -
i will not own one and implore to people that do own or want to,
please find a safety course for these things and go and do it.

it's nice to cut up firewood with it, but loosing the use of an arm or leg for the rest of your life to keep you warm for an hour just ain't worth it.


VladTepes

11th December , PM

What are they made from ? I wouldn't have thought leather etc would stop a running chainsaw !

(otherwise zombies would wear lederhosen !)

EDIT: I read your post above Col. Col. and its very helpful thanks.
Do you have a link so I can see what sort of chaps etc are meant ?

The scenario I can most imagine is coming across a fallen log out bush and needing to remove it. I heartily agree that spending a few minutes gearing up is better than losing a leg etc (and still a lot quicker than the ax and handsaw we used the other weekend - that was a BIG tree). Having said that, safety gear is no good if its SO cumbersome and time consuming to put on that no-one bothers. Any and all advice (esp with piccies etc) appreciated.

Come to think of it Col Col if you feel a bit literary and could put together a brief "safety tips for using chainsaws' article discussing these things, I'd be happy to publish it in the next issue of the AULRO-vian. Also the LROC Brisbane magazine too. Let me know.


abaddonxi

11th December , PM

YouTube - Remote Control Zombie Versus Remote Control Lederhosen (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZB9EJ1tEHM)


hiline

11th December , PM

just for you Vlad :D:D

vroom vroom

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported//12/jpg


rick

12th December , AM

What are they made from ? I wouldn't have thought leather etc would stop a running chainsaw !

<snip>

they are generally a cordura type outer with a fill in between that clogs up the moving chain in hundredths of a second. (In 'standard' testing we are talking about seconds)
Some use kevlar in their construction, and while kevlar is semi-cut resistant it isn't resistant to a moving chain and the non-kevlar ones meet or exceed the same standards, so i tend to think the kevlar thing is a bit of a marketing tool.

As I said above, I like Clogger brand.
They are well made (In New Zealand) and come in three sizes, something the US made ones don't appear to (one size fits all)
Most only cover the front of the leg or are a partial wrap. The ones I have have a full wrap around the calf and a large zip up the back of the calf so there is nothing to snag when walking. Most chaps just use a belt and buckle arrangement at the back and tend to snag when you are walking through scrub.

Like mcrover, I very nearly bought trousers, but
a. they are more exxy
b. when it's warm, I can wear shorts underneath my chaps and keep cool. (and going commando can put some people off :p )

here's a list of different types tro compare Safety Trousers / Chaps (http://www.newagearbor.com.au/shop/category_1.htm)


mcrover

12th December , AM

There are different types of trousers as well and ther ones we have ordered (I havnt seen a set yet) are meant to be lighter weight than the standard Sthil ones and are washable where as the older sthil and husky ones when washed could stuff up the filling so these ones are cross stitched look a bit weird but I recon looking good while cutting down tree's is the last thing Im aiming forand if you have seen a photo of me a fairly impossible feat.:p

The chaps and the trousers take up very little room, the goggles and muffs take up bugger all room as well or even a helmet and mask but the things that really take up the most room would have to me the saw and the fuel and bar oil so again, I dont think the safety gear has much of a negative in that way.


Redback

15th December , AM

Well there is good and bad news regarding my camping weekend and the chainsaw:twisted:

First thing, the saw started no prob, then after 4 cuts of a length of tree, it started to splutter, then bog and then would only idle, too me this was fuel/oil mix (ie) too rich, i persivered for a while but it would not run, so i hoyked it into the bushes:twisted::twisted: the missus retreived it, as a backup i took along my 52cc $50 Ebay special, which preformed faultlessly.

When i got home Sunday, i was going to clean the Shindaiwa and give it to the chainsaw guy to sell, i fired it up and just stood there with it idling and trying to get it to go by pushing the throttle to just before it would bog and hold it there, after a while she started to get better then after 5min of quick bursts of the throttle it fired at full revs:eek::eek:

I cut up some wood for about 10min without a problem:spudnikwhat:

I'm at a lose as to why it does this, the fuel in it was only 3 weeks old and i topped it up when it started to bog down with the same fuel i originally filled it with, so if it was the fuel it should still not be going, it works at home and at the mower shop, but not when i take it camping or when getting firewood for home :eek:

Very frustrating:mad:

Baz.


hiline

15th December , PM

sorry mate cant help you myself :angel:

but mine has been fantastic since new
never been serviced yet like most my mechanical things:wasntme:
never worry to much about the fuel mix either

but the darn thing never stops :D


mcrover

15th December , PM

Well there is good and bad news regarding my camping weekend and the chainsaw:twisted:

First thing, the saw started no prob, then after 4 cuts of a length of tree, it started to splutter, then bog and then would only idle, too me this was fuel/oil mix (ie) too rich, i persivered for a while but it would not run, so i hoyked it into the bushes:twisted::twisted: the missus retreived it, as a backup i took along my 52cc $50 Ebay special, which preformed faultlessly.

When i got home Sunday, i was going to clean the Shindaiwa and give it to the chainsaw guy to sell, i fired it up and just stood there with it idling and trying to get it to go by pushing the throttle to just before it would bog and hold it there, after a while she started to get better then after 5min of quick bursts of the throttle it fired at full revs:eek::eek:

I cut up some wood for about 10min without a problem:spudnikwhat:

I'm at a lose as to why it does this, the fuel in it was only 3 weeks old and i topped it up when it started to bog down with the same fuel i originally filled it with, so if it was the fuel it should still not be going, it works at home and at the mower shop, but not when i take it camping or when getting firewood for home :eek:

Very frustrating:mad:

Baz.

Geez Baz, If I was any closer I'd have a play with it for you but all I can tell you is that it sounds like it may have an air leak in the fuel pick up or intake manifold.

If it's more when it's hot then it may well be the intake manifold as as it heats up it may open up a crack in a gasket or something like that.

If it is hot or cold, it could be a cracked or loose fuel line or even one that has a pin hole in it that gets disturbed when your operation it.

The fuel pick up has a filter on the end, that can get blocked up and you can get fuel starvation which can be similar to what your experiencing.

The only other thing would be some crap floating around the carbi diaphram or stuck in a jet but that would normally be all the time so I doubt it would be that.


sorry mate cant help you myself :angel:

but mine has been fantastic since new
never been serviced yet like most my mechanical things:wasntme:
never worry to much about the fuel mix either

but the darn thing never stops :D

Naughty Naughty Ray but I spose if it aint broke dont fix it.:p


Redback

16th December , AM

Geez Baz, If I was any closer I'd have a play with it for you but all I can tell you is that it sounds like it may have an air leak in the fuel pick up or intake manifold.

If it's more when it's hot then it may well be the intake manifold as as it heats up it may open up a crack in a gasket or something like that.

If it is hot or cold, it could be a cracked or loose fuel line or even one that has a pin hole in it that gets disturbed when your operation it.

The fuel pick up has a filter on the end, that can get blocked up and you can get fuel starvation which can be similar to what your experiencing.

The only other thing would be some crap floating around the carbi diaphram or stuck in a jet but that would normally be all the time so I doubt it would be that.



Naughty Naughty Ray but I spose if it aint broke dont fix it.:p

Thanks mate, it doesn't matter it happens hot or cold, after i had it fixed and going well with new fuel i left it for 3 weeks to see what it would do, started after the 3 weeks and as above got 4 cuts into a tree and it karked it:mad: very frustrating and now i can't trust it to take away with us or for getting firewood.

I might have a word with the mower place to see if he can look at it properly, as it's still under warrenty i need him to look at it first, if he can't fix it then something else needs to be done about it.

Baz.


dirtdawg

16th December , PM

sorry mate cant help you myself :angel:

but mine has been fantastic since new
never been serviced yet like most my mechanical things:wasntme:
never worry to much about the fuel mix either

but the darn thing never stops :D

just gets a lil hard to start sometimes ;)


hiline

16th December , PM

yeah but once i run the old fuel out from last trip its fine again :angel:

fuel doesn't go stale in my books :p


Redback

21st December , PM

Well i'm happy to report that my chainsaw is getting fixed, after 3 days at the shop he discovered that there is a problem with the saw other than a fuel problem, he put a carby kit through it, but that didn't fix it, he's going away for Xmas and so are we, so he's lent me his Shindaiwa for our trip away and it will be fixed when he comes back.

So hopefully all will be good after Xmas:D

Baz.


Col.Coleman

21st December , PM

Except you won't want to give it back.

Check what chain is on it, if it is a full chisel, take care. IIRC it should have a pro-lite bar and chain.

CC


Redback

22nd December , AM

Except you won't want to give it back.

Check what chain is on it, if it is a full chisel, take care. IIRC it should have a pro-lite bar and chain.

CC

Ahh no if it's fixed i'll keep it, he suspects it has an air leak, which is what mcrover mentioned.

I haven't really looked at his saw, i've been busy building some new sliders for the Disco for our trip over Xmas.

Baz.


hiline

22nd December , AM

Ahh no if it's fixed i'll keep it, he suspects it has an air leak, which is what mcrover mentioned.

I haven't really looked at his saw, i've been busy building some new sliders for the Disco for our trip over Xmas.

Baz.

no wonder your chainsaw is stuffed :eek:

its for cutting wood ;)


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Sours: https://www.aulro.com/afvb/archive/index.php/thtml

My First Shindaiwa!

So I've been looking for a smaller, more nimble saw to take care of limbs, and little stuff when I am out cutting firewood. I kept reading good things here about the Shindaiwa / and I finally got a on Craigslist yesterday. It was in good shape (homeowner owned) and came with a case. Got it for $ which I thought was fair.
It needed a few carb adjustments, but runs great now. I was quite surprised with the pep of this little saw, and couldn't believe how fast it cut! While I only ran it for about 15 minutes today, I've got a good feeling about this little dude.
I am going to put a flocked air filter in it, give it a 14'' bar instead of the 16'' that's on it now, and probably replace the fuel cap. I love its light-weight feel, and swift acceleration.
Make sure you don't overlook these little Shindaiwa saws if you are looking for a smaller, well-constructed saw that really sings.

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Best,

Peter

Running:
Stihl Mag II
Husqvarna 55 Rancher
Shindaiwa

Projects
Homelite Super EZ Auto
McCulloch Titan 57
Stihl t

 

Sours: https://www.arboristsite.com/threads/my-first-shindaiwa/
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Joined: Mon Mar 23, pm
Posts: 78
Country, City, Area: Alberta, Canada
My first was a little tired but had been well-cared-for. A new OEM piston & rings, fuel line, tank vent, carb screw grommet, and new gaskets for the oil & fuel caps were installed. The air filter was converted from the original mesh to the newer EPA-era flocked type. This required some material removal from the top cover with a Dremel and screws and washers for the new intake manifold (the whole assembly can be seen in the IPL in the Carburetor section) I also replaced the old coarse-mesh pre-filter with the newer fine-mesh type. The fuel tank was starting to weep from the seam right under the throttle trigger, so a Q-bond repair was made and is holding perfectly. As of March , OEM parts availability is still excellent here in Canada (from ECHO dealers) for these saws, and prices are reasonable. 40cm/16" 3/8" low-pro B&C.

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Sours: http://www.chainsawcollectors.se/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?t=
Shindaiwa Introduces a Full Line up of Chainsaws

Shindaiwa / Hybrid - A Pleasant Surprise

A few months back, Four Paws, one of our resident Shindaiwa aficionados, had a nifty little saw up for sale: a / hybrid he had put together. A crank in a case, for added stroke in a more compact/lighter crankcase. Curiously, no bites.

http://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/shindaiwa/#post

It seemed intriguing, especially since most of my cutting is in small invasive buckthorn and such, and I have become a real fan of this displacement class. My usual kit for this work is the family Husqvarna, and I’m working on accumulating both more runners and parts saws of that family, and also other saws in that size class (xpg?). Anyway, this little Shindaiwa fit the bill, so I bought it and ordered up a suitable bar (A mount, so nothing else I own works on it). And this past weekend I finally had a chance to put four tanks through it.



What a great little package! The spec sheets don't really capture it - the weight, handling, powerband, and such - the way that real-world use does. Great behavior for my purposes and, I should think, for many other peoples’ purposes, too! The powerhead occupies a bit less physical space than the Husqvarnas, and less in fact than saws of the Stihl / family, which many of y’all are likely familiar with.







Now honestly, before SawTroll jumps in and points it out, A/V is a bit primitive, probably due to harder-than-average buffers when compared to my usual rubber-isolated Husqvarnas. And Brad will be correct about its performance potential: I'm sure that other saws in this class can wake up more with porting. But you know, this saw was a real pleasure to run and handled well. I was pleasantly surprised. And, when those four tanks were done, I looked back at what those four tanks got me and I was pleased: it is a really productive little machine. In that time I put down probably fifty buckthorn trees from 1" to 15" diameter, cut them up into conveniently sized pieces that can be dragged by hand and made into brush piles, and this saw got the job done great!







I doubt my review would have been so glowing with a 16" or 18" bar hanging off the saw, especially if the saw were being asked to use all " of said bar. But the 13" " setup with Oregon 20lp chain hits the sweet spot for this powerhead (size, power, balance, etc.) and makes for a really versatile machine.

I know that the spec sheet folks on this site will point out what this saw lacks, and the folks who think the true measure of a saw is its time through a knot-free poplar cant will correctly point out that many saws will outrun this one against a stopwatch, even saws in the same displacement class. But darn it, this was unusually satisfying to run, rather productive in its appointed task, and the build quality is superb.

 

Sours: https://www.arboristsite.com/threads/shindaiwahybrid-a-pleasant-surprise/

Price chainsaw shindaiwa 360

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Shindaiwa 360

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