Amd ryzen 3700x release date

Amd ryzen 3700x release date DEFAULT

AMD’s third generation of Ryzen CPUs are here, including the company’s first mainstream CPU to feature 12 cores, the Ryzen 9 3900X. The company is announcing five new processors as part of the lineup, all with a release date of July 7th. Their prices range from $199 to $499, and all of them are based on the company’s new 7nm Zen 2 architecture with support for the new PCIe 4.0 interface, which offers double the bandwidth of PCIe 3.0.

At the top of the lineup is the Ryzen 9 3900X. This 12 core processor has a base frequency of 3.8GHz, and is capable of boosting up to 4.6GHz. Next, the company has a pair of Ryzen 7 processors, the $399 3800X and $329 3700X. Both feature eight cores clocked at slightly different frequencies (visible in the table below) but the big difference is TDP, a basic indicator of a CPU’s power consumption. AnandTech notes that the 3700X has a TDP of just 65W compared to 105W for the 3800X, suggesting that it could be a very power-efficient processor for the amount of performance you’re getting. Finally, at the bottom of the lineup there are the Ryzen 5 3600X and 3600.

AMD Ryzen 3 CPU comparison

ModelCores/ ThreadsBase FrequencyBoost FrequencyTDPPrice
Ryzen 9 3900X12C/24T3.8GHz4.6GHz105W$499
Ryzen 7 3800X8C/16T3.9GHz4.5GHz105W$399
Ryzen 7 3700X8C/16T3.6GHz4.4GHz65W$329
Ryzen 5 3600X6C/12T3.8GHz4.4GHz95W$249
Ryzen 5 36006C/12T3.6GHz4.2GHz65W$199

AMD has a few benchmarks to show off how it expects its new CPUs to perform. The company claims that its flagship 3900X will offer similar performance to Intel’s i9-9920X despite costing around half as much ($499 compared to $1,189). Meanwhile, AMD’s benchmarks suggest that the $329 3700X beats Intel’s $374 i7-9700K in both single and multi-threaded real-time rendering performance. We’ll have to wait to try out the new CPUs for ourselves to see how their performance stacks up in general usage.

All of the new CPUs are based on AMD’s new X570 chipset, which uses the same AM4 socket as AMD’s previous Ryzen CPUs. In theory, this means that if you already use a Ryzen processor then you should be able to swap one of the new CPUs into your system without having to upgrade your motherboard. However, in practice the power requirements of the new chips will mean that not every AM4 motherboard will support them. You’re not going to be faced with a lack of choice if you do need to upgrade your motherboard for the new chips however; AMD says that there will be 56 X570 motherboards available from its partners when the new CPUs launch.

Away from its CPUs, AMD also teased its next generation of graphics cards with a demonstration of the upcoming Radeon RX 5700. This 7nm-based GPU will run on AMD’s new RDNA microarchitecture, which finally replaces the existing GCN architecture that AMD first introduced back in 2011. AMD claims that, compared to its predecessor, RDNA offers 25 percent higher performance per clock and 50 percent higher performance per watt. It will also be one of the first GPUs to support the new PCIe 4.0 interface. The new GPU is expected to launch in July.

Sours: https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2019/5/28/18642251/amd-ryzen-3000-cpus-3900x-3800x-3700x-3600x-3600-price-release-date-specs

AMD Ryzen 3000 release date, price, specs, and everything we know

For the past decade or more, AMD has been sitting in second place in the CPU wars. It's not for lack of trying, and the past two years of Ryzen processors have certainly shaken things up in the competition to deliver the best CPU. Intel still managed to win in several areas—gaming in particular—but that could all change with the launch of the third generation Ryzen CPUs. 

Using the Zen 2 architecture and with a leading edge 7nm process technology courtesy of TSMC, this is the first time AMD has ever had a manufacturing node advantage over rival Intel. This is huge, and it gives AMD a legitimate shot at the CPU throne. And not just for multithreaded workloads—we don't have independent numbers yet, but AMD could even come out ahead of Intel in gaming performance. 

Here's everything we know about the features, architecture, price, models, specs, and release date of the upcoming Ryzen 3000 series. 

Decoding codenames

All of AMD's current generation processors are based on some form of Zen, the name of its modern CPU architecture for every processor category—desktops, laptops, all-in-ones, servers, and so forth. While generally easier to follow than Intel's many different CPU architectures, it can still be confusing. Let's clear that up. Here are the versions of Zen, along with the corresponding codenames and desktop processor series:

  • Zen ("Summit Ridge")—Ryzen 1000 series
  • Zen+ ("Pinnacle Ridge")—Ryzen 2000 series
  • Zen 2 ("Matisse")—Ryzen 3000 series
  • Zen 3 ("TBA")—Ryzen 4000 series?
  • Zen 4 ("TBA")—Ryzen 5000 series?

Zen 2 is actually the third iteration of the Zen microarchitecture, and is attached to AMD's upcoming Ryzen 3000 series. AMD's first-gen Ryzen processors (Zen) utilized a 14-nanometer FinFET manufacturing process. For the second-gen Ryzen parts (Zen+), AMD shifted to a 12nm node but with only minor updates to the architecture. The upcoming Ryzen 3000 series (Zen 2) processors are built on a 7nm node and contain significant changes to the underlying architecture along with the die shrink. Then in 2020 (most likely), AMD will launch its Zen 3 lineup, built on an enhanced 7nm+ node. Furthermore, AMD says Zen 3 is "on track" and that the subsequent Zen 4 architecture is currently "in the design phase".

I should note there are even more codenames than the ones above. What I've labeled are the names of AMD's mainstream desktop processors, but there also exist codenames for the company's CPUs with Vega graphics (essentially APUs, or accelerated processing units) and Epyc server chips. Further confusing the matter, the 2000 series APUs (eg, 2200G and 2400G) are first gen Zen architecture parts, and there are two new desktop APUs, the Ryzen 3 3200G and Ryzen 5 3400G, that are built using the second generation Zen+ architecture.

Ryzen 3000 series specs and pricing

AMD has officially announced six third generation Ryzen CPUs now, along with the two Ryzen 3000 desktop APUs. As anticipated after the first real glimpse of the processor at CES, Ryzen 3000 will come in two different varieties—and probably a third later once Zen 2 APUs arrive. I'll get into the specifics of why certain changes were made in a moment, but AMD now has a cIOD (client IO die) manufactured using 12nm, which consists of the memory controller and other aspects of the chipset. This in turn links to one or two CCDs—the actual Ryzen CPU cores and cache. The Ryzen 9 parts will have two CCD chips inside the package, along with the cIOD, while the Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 will have a single CCD.  Here's what we know of the actual Ryzen 3000 lineup

  • Ryzen 9 3950X—16C/32T, 3.5GHz to 4.7GHz, 72MB cache, 105W TDP, $749 (in September)
  • Ryzen 9 3900X—12C/24T, 3.8GHz to 4.6GHz, 70MB cache, 105W TDP, $499
  • Ryzen 7 3800X—8C/16T, 3.9GHz to 4.5GHz, 36MB cache, 105W TDP, $399
  • Ryzen 7 3700X—8C/16T, 3.6GHz to 4.4GHz, 36MB cache, 65W TDP, $329
  • Ryzen 5 3600X—6C/12T, 3.8GHz to 4.4GHz, 35MB cache, 95W TDP, $249
  • Ryzen 5 3600—6C/12T, 3.6GHz to 4.2GHz, 35MB cache, 65W TDP, $199
  • Ryzen 5 3400G—(Zen+) 4C/8T, 3.7GHz to 4.2GHz, 6MB cache, Vega 11 Graphics at 1400MHz, 65W TDP, $149
  • Ryzen 3 3200G—(Zen+) 4C/4T, 3.6GHz to 4.0GHz, 6MB cache, Vega 8 Graphics at 1250MHz, 65W TDP, $99

All of the above, with the exception of the 3950X, will launch on July 7—including the two second generation Zen+ APUs. There will likely be additional Ryzen 3000 parts, but this is what AMD has revealed so far. There may be lower price 4C/8T or 4C/4T Ryzen 3 models at some point, but those at least partially overlap the APUs and may not be necessary.

Pricing for the Ryzen 3000 parts is clearly higher than earlier rumors (guesses), and clockspeeds perhaps aren't quite as high as some had hoped. However, there's more to performance than clockspeeds, and power requirements are generally much lower than the competing Intel parts. Let's dig into some of the lower level details now to better understand what AMD has planned.

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The Zen 2 architecture

Zen 2 is more than just a die shrink—a switch to the smaller 7nm manufacturing process. Smaller process nodes typically mean better power efficiency, potentially higher clockspeeds, and improved density—or more transistors in the same size chip. All of those benefits appear to be part of the Ryzen 3000 processors, but there's a lot more going on underneath the hood. At a high level, AMD claims IPC (Instructions Per Clock) is 15 percent higher than Zen+. That means for the same number of cores and the same clockspeed, Zen 2 should be 15 percent faster. But how did AMD get that 15 percent improvement? It's all in the architectural details.

I already mentioned one major change with the Zen 2 design, moving the memory controller into a separate IO chip. This has a latency penalty compared to previous Ryzen CPUs, but it has the benefit of not creating substantially different memory latencies when moving to a dual chiplet design like Ryzen 9. But that memory latency increase ends up being mostly a moot point according to AMD, thanks to the other architectural changes.

One big update is the doubling of the L3 cache size. On the single chiplet Ryzen 5/7 parts, there's a 32MB victim cache—meaning, data in the L2 cache doesn't get replicated into the L3 cache (an exclusive cache if you prefer). The dual chiplet Ryzen 9 CPUs meanwhile come with a combined 64MB L3 cache. Because of the exclusive caching design, AMD adds the L2 and L3 cache sizes and calls this the Gaming Cache. With 512KB of L2 cache per core, that gives the 6-core Ryzen 5 chips 35MB of Gaming Cache, 36MB of Gaming Cache for the 8-core Ryzen 7 parts, the 12-core has 70MB of Gaming Cache, and the big daddy 16-core 3950X has 72MB of Gaming Cache.

And what do those massive cache sizes do for memory latency? AMD says on average the effective memory latency is reduced by 33ns relative to Zen+, which in turn can improve performance by up to 21 percent—and that's in games. The larger L3 cache sizes do cause a slight increase in cache latency—typical L3 cache latency is now 40-45 cycles compared to 35-40 cycles on Zen—but compared to the roughly 200 cycle latency of system memory the benefits should be substantial. And if you're keeping track, L1 cache latency is still 4 cycles and L2 cache latency is 12 cycles.

Going along with the larger caches, AMD has added a new TAGE branch predictor in Zen 2. There's a whole lot of technical detail we could get into, but fundamentally incorrect branch predictions can cause a pretty big performance hit—the 19-stage pipeline gets flushed and restarted, so every branch miss is a major opportunity for performance improvements. Zen 2 keeps the Perceptron branch predictor for the L1 cache (which already works well), but adds the more complex TAGE branch predictor for the L2 cache. The net result is that AMD says Zen 2 will make 30 percent fewer incorrect branch predictions.

In the execution units, AMD also added a third AGU (Address Generation Unit). That gives Zen 2 seven execution ports, but it can still only dispatch up to six instructions per clock. However, there are enough cases where the CPU could use another AGU that it apparently made sense.

Another change is to the floating point (FP) performance, with AMD doubling the AVX performance. Where Zen and Zen+ had a two cycle latency for AVX256 instructions, Zen 2 is single cycle. There's a related change to the load and store bandwidth, which is now 256 bits wide instead of 128 bits. Also, multiplication latency is three cycles, down from four cycles. This may not affect all workloads that much, but for applications that utilize AVX2, the gains should be pretty substantial.

Something not quite as directly applicable to the CPU architecture is Zen 2's support for PCIe 4.0. That doubles the bandwidth between the CPU and chipset, as well as the M.2 slot. It should also boost the bandwidth between the CCDs and the cIOD within the package, since those Infinity Fabric links are presumably PCIe 4.0 derived as well. What PCIe 4.0 means in the real world is less clear. SSDs that support the new standard are coming, and will deliver even higher throughput than existing M.2 NVMe SSDs. But for gaming purposes, neither the GPU nor the storage is likely to matter much.

There are plenty of other tweaks in Zen 2—a larger 4K micro-Op cache, larger 180 entry register rename space (up from 168), increased L1/L2 BTB tables (512 L1 vs. 256, 7K L2 vs. 4K), moving from a 64K 4-way associated L1 cache to a 32K 8-way L1 cache, a 224 reorder buffer (vs. 192), and more. That's all highly technical stuff that you need to be a microprocessor engineer to properly appreciate, but the bottom line is that Zen 2 ends up being better than Zen/Zen+ in just about every way.

How much better? I'll get to AMD's claims in a moment, but one interesting point that came out of discussions with AMD's CPU experts is that even though the theoretical maximum IPC of Zen 2 is 6.0—if it filled every possible instruction dispatch every cycle—in the real world most applications are only getting an IPC of about 1.5. There are more predictable workloads where IPC might be as high as 3.0, other complex workloads where IPC drops as low as 0.25, but on average Zen 2 is getting 1.5. The larger caches, improved branch prediction, extra AGU, larger buffers, and other architectural changes are all ways of improving IPC.

AMD Ryzen 3000 performance

AMD is setting expectations quite high with Zen 2, claiming an average 15 percent IPC improvement relative to Zen+. That 15 percent improvement comes from all the above architectural updates, and combined with higher clockspeeds and core counts, performance should be a significant step up from the Ryzen 2000 series. But it's not just about the hardware, as there are some software changes that will also play a role.

One of the big problems AMD has faced with its Ryzen and Threadripper CPUs is that Windows simply doesn't have a great process scheduler when it comes to designs like Zen/Zen+/Zen 2. Specifically, L3 cache latency is worse on the AM4 processors when a thread is running on one CCX (Core CompleX—a group of four CPU cores along with their caches and other bits) and accesses data stored in the L3 cache on the other CCX. This increases memory latency, and it would be better if threads from the same application were grouped on the same CCX when possible.

The Windows 10 May 2019 update improves on the Windows scheduler, and combined with a new AMD chipset driver (which isn't available to the public yet), thread scheduling should be better. This could improve performance by 5-10 percent in some workloads, and it will be available for all Ryzen and Threadripper platforms by the time the new CPUs launch. What isn't clear is how much of the performance increases AMD showed in its slides will come just from the Zen 2 architecture, and how much comes from the new scheduler, but I'll look into it more once I have CPUs in hand.

Intel has made some bold statements about performance, going so far as to say "come beat us in gaming if you can." I'll have full independent numbers in the coming weeks, but as of now, I can provide both information on where AMD and Intel currently stand, as well as AMD's performance information for several Ryzen 3000 CPUs. If AMD's slides are accurate, Intel may regret that challenge.

Starting with the Core i9-9900K against the Ryzen 9 3900X, across eight games AMD is showing relatively equivalent performance. The same goes for the Core i7-9700K versus the Ryzen 7 3800X, and the Core i5-9600K going up against the Ryzen 5 3600X. AMD performed all of these gaming tests at 1080p high settings, where the CPU is more likely to make a difference, and the graphics card used is an RTX 2080. That last point is important, as if you're using a slower GPU like an RX 580 or GTX 1060, you'd see far less of a difference. Unfortunately, AMD didn't provide hard numbers for both the AMD and Intel CPUs, so all I can say is that the results look relatively similar.

Let me put that into context, however. I've been retesting all of the modern Intel and AMD CPUs in advance of the Ryzen 3000 launch, using an RTX 2080 Ti and testing at 1080p ultra. With ten different games (Assassin's Creed Odyssey, The Division 2, Far Cry 5, Fortnite, Hitman 2, Metro Exodus, Middle-Earth: Shadow of War, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Strange Brigade, and Total War: Warhammer 2), I can say that the fastest gaming CPU in my results right now is the Core i7-9700K, which just edges out the Core i9-9900K—141.0 fps compared to 139.4 fps. The Core i5-9600K incidentally gets 131.4 fps.

More important than the i9 vs. i7 vs. i5 Intel comparison is the Intel vs. AMD Ryzen comparison. The Ryzen 7 2700X averages 118.1 fps and the Ryzen 5 2600X gets 116.8 fps, so Intel leads by 19 percent on average, and the Core i5 leads by 12.5 percent. Looking at the individual games, Strange Brigade is AMD's best result—it's a tie among basically all five CPUs—while Far Cry 5, Hitman 2, and Shadow of War have Intel leading by 30-45 percent in some cases.

What we don't know is exactly where the Ryzen 3000 CPUs will land relative to these processors. However, with a claimed 15 percent IPC improvement and slightly higher clockspeeds, plus larger caches that in some cases might result in even larger gaming performance improvements (AMD showed up to 30 percent improvements relative to the 2700X in another comparison), things could change. AMD's Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 7 3800X in particular could potentially end up as the best processors for gaming and other tasks come July.

Will AMD claim an outright lead in gaming performance? Perhaps not. However, with 12-core going up against 8-core, 8-core/16-thread going up against 8-core/8-thread, and 6-core/12-thread squaring off against 6-core/6-thread, the non-gaming matchups look to be decidedly in favor of AMD. Perhaps that's why Intel is talking smack about games?

These non-gaming results from AMD all support the above statements. With relatively similar clockspeeds and IPC on both AMD and Intel CPUs, having 50 percent more cores/threads—or even twice as many cores/threads—guarantees AMD will win every meaningful multithreaded performance comparison. Cinebench, POV-Ray, Blender, H.264 encoding, H.265 encoding, cryptography, and more should all favor AMD's Ryzen 3000. Even singlethreaded performance looks close, based on what AMD showed (which may not be representative of all workloads).

Keep in mind that a lot of consumers really don't do much in the way of heavily multithreaded workloads. Cinebench, POV-Ray, Blender, and other 3D rendering applications are popular CPU benchmarks, in part because they're easy to run. Outside of professionals, few people use such applications. About the most complex task a typical consumer would perform is video encoding, like when livestreaming gameplay. Otherwise, for non-professional work the need for more than an 8-core CPU is debatable.

More telling is the TDPs of AMD's parts. Both the 12-core and 16-core Ryzen 9 parts are supposed to be 105W parts. Whether they'll fully respect that power limit or the motherboard manufacturers will "boost" performance and run at higher clocks is not yet clear. Intel's CPUs certainly run well beyond their rated TDP in some workloads, and with the 7nm process AMD's new chips should come out in the lead on power.

Something else to point out here is that Intel's Skylake-X processors look absolutely terrible in terms of efficiency compared to Zen 2, or even the Coffee Lake refresh. I've seen 10-core Skylake-X (i9-7900X) pull as much as 300W for a CPU heavy workload at "stock." Performance can be good in the right scenarios, but it's using far more power than I'd like. The i9-7980XE carries things even further, with peak CPU loads reaching as high as 450W. That's nearly double what I see on the mainstream AM4 and LGA1151 platforms.

When is the Ryzen 3000 release date?

All of AMD's Ryzen 3000 and Radeon 5700 products are set to launch on July 7, 2019. That's a shoutout to the 7nm technology at the heart of the products. As far as review embargoes and independent performance testing, that could come sooner, but officially AMD hasn't given a date yet. Sometime in the next few weeks, we'll have the full reviews posted for most of the new CPUs, but the 3950X won't arrive until September. Let the official countdown to launch commence. 

Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/amd-ryzen-3000-release-date-price-specs/
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AMD Ryzen 3000 release date, news and rumors

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By Kevin Lee

AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation is finally here

Thanks to all the AMD Ryzen 3000 CPUs on the market these days, you could say that Team Red is on its way to processor dominance. AMD improved the market with their first-generation Ryzen chips and, with the Ryzen 2nd-generation back in 2018, they managed to double Intel’s sales. It’s no surprise that Ryzen’s 3rd generation came with a lot of hype. Thankfully, Team Red managed to beat all expectations.

That’s because the AMD Ryzen 3000 CPUs introduced the 7-nanometer(nm) Zen 2 architecture into the mainstream. And, they managed to do so with an accessible price tag for the average buyer. Now, you can get a CPU with 16-cores and 32-threads without getting a high-end workstation thanks to the Ryzen 9 3950X, which broke world overclocking records when it was released. AMD has also released processors to win the hearts of budget gamers with chips like the Ryzen 3100

Considering Intel’s problems with releasing the 10nm Cannon Lake chips and it’s still having issues even in 2021, it’s no wonder that the AMD Ryzen 3000 processors have been such a big hit. And, thanks to the introduction of the new AMD Ryzen 5000 chips as well as the Ryzen 5000 CPUs for laptops, Team Red is establishing itself as the go-to chipmaker for content creators, gamers, and even casual users for the foreseeable future. 

Take a look at this page to learn everything you need to know about AMD Ryzen 3000. These older CPUs are still worth considering in 2021, especially because the Ryzen 5000 stock is as limited as ever. With a long list of modern motherboards already supporting Ryzen 5000, it should be easy for you to upgrade later when they’re more readily available.

THE VERDICT IS IN

AMD Ryzen 9 3900X | 5 stars | Incredible performance, PCIe 4.0, Beats Intel at the same price | Single core performance still behind, Included heatsink may not be enough

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X | 4.5 stars | Incredible price to performance; Affordable; Included cooler | Single-threaded performance still falls behind Intel

AMD Ryzen 5 3600X | 5 stars | Excellent performance; Affordable; Includes a cooler | Still 6-cores

AMD Ryzen 5 3600 | 5 stars | Top-tier gaming performance; Easy upgrade path; High value | Only six cores

AMD Ryzen 3 3300X | 4.5 stars| Excellent multi-core performance, Affordable, Mid-range gaming performance for cheap | Not a huge jump over Ryzen 3 3100

AMD Ryzen 3 3100 | 4.5 stars | Excellent performance, Affordable, Doesn't suck up much power | Not as fast as the 3300X, May bottleneck high-end GPUs

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? AMD’s 3rd generation of mainstream processors for laptops and desktops
  • When is it out? Out since July 7, 2019
  • What will it cost? Starting at $99 (about £79, AU$150)

AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation release date

The AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation processors, first announced at CES 2019, are out now. Many of them finally hit the streets on July 7. The Ryzen 9 3900 and Ryzen 5 3500X, on the other hand, both came out on October 8. The AMD Ryzen 9 3950X, the surprise reveal of E3 2019, came out later on November 25. 

AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation price

At AMD’s Computex 2019 keynote, Team Red showcased several processors from the Ryzen 5 3600 to the Ryzen 9 3900X. These CPUs offer seriously impressive options from the mid-range to the high-end. Curiously, there have been no announcements of any 7nm Zen 2 processors for the budget sector, but at least AMD launched new APUs in the Ryzen 3 3300G and Ryzen 5 3400G at $99 (£94, AU$144) and $149 (£139, AU$240), respectively.

  • AMD Ryzen 9 3950X: $749 (about £590, AU$1,080)
  • AMD Ryzen 9 3900X: $499 (about £390, AU$720)
  • AMD Ryzen 7 3800X: $399 (about £310, AU$580)
  • AMD Ryzen 7 3700X: $329 (about £260, AU$480)
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600X: $249 (about £200, AU$360)
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600: $199 (about £160, AU$290)
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3400G: $149 (£139, AU$240)
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3300X: $120 (about £100, AU$190)
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3300G: $99 (£94, AU$144)
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3100: $99 (about £79, AU$150)

AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation specs

Now that the AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation lineup has been released, we know exactly what’s inside these new 7nm processors for consumers. You should experience perceptible performance bumps, with power consumption taking a nosedive. Improvements all around.

The 7nm Zen 2 architecture found in AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation processors allows AMD to bring TDP down to just 65W in the Ryzen 5 3600, for one. It also implements a considerable 15% improvement to IPC (instructions per clock) performance. This should see performance go up, resulting in some of the best processors for gaming.

With the Ryzen 5 3600X, AMD takes the performance of the budget-minded Ryzen 5 2600X to another level, increasing IPC (instructions per clock) performance and clock speed while keeping the same price point. 

Of course, if we can’t talk about AMD’s affordable releases without mentioning the AMD Ryzen 3 3300X, which delivers mid-range gaming performance for much cheaper, and its lower-specced sibling, the AMD Ryzen 3 3100. The Ryzen 3 3300X boasts double the amount of L3 cache over its predecessor and manages to be about 10-20% faster with its 4 cores, 8 threads and 4.3GHz in boost clock. The Ryzen 3 3100, on the other hand, has the same amount of L3 cache, as well as the same number of cores and threads. However, it has a boost clock of only 3.6GHz.

On the high-end, there’s the Ryzen 9 3950X, an absolute monster of a processor, with 16 cores and 32 threads and a boost clock of 4.7GHz. These specs are stunning in their own right, but what really takes it to the next level is that it manages to do it with a relatively low 105W TDP. 

Next to it is the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X, and while it’s not as impressive as the 3950X – at least on paper – it still packs 12-cores and 24-threads of high-performance power. With boost clocks up to 4.6GHz, it’s an impressive amount of power for that 105W TDP, even if temperatures get a little high. And, for about the same price point, the Ryzen 9 3900X is between 25%-40% faster than the Intel Core i9-9900K in multi-threaded loads.

And there’s the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, which boasts 8-core, 16-thread and a TDP of just 65W. Just like the Ryzen 9 3900X, it’s also an absolute beast when it comes to multi-threaded workloads.

As far as the rumored new wave of Ryzen 3000 processors, well, the AMD Ryzen 9 3900 would be a lower-powered version of the excellent AMD Ryzen 9 3900X, with a similar relationship between the Ryzen 7 3700 and the Ryzen 7 3700X. They apparently will have the same core and thread counts as their X counterparts, only with a 65W TDP.

However, AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation is more than just the mid-range and the top-end. If a new leak is to be trusted, we may be seeing an AMD Ryzen 3 3100 and an AMD Ryzen 3 3300X, both of which would be 4-core, 8-thread entry-level 65W processors. 

We went ahead and listed out all the specs of the confirmed Ryzen 3000 processors below:

  • AMD Ryzen 9 3950X – 16-cores, 32-threads | 4.7GHz boost, 3.5GHz base | 105W
  • AMD Ryzen 9 3900X – 12-cores, 24-threads | 4.6GHz boost, 3.8GHz base | 105W 
  • AMD Ryzen 7 3800X – 8-cores, 16-threads | 4.5GHz boost, 3.9GHz base | 105W
  • AMD Ryzen 7 3700X – 8-cores, 16-threads | 4.4GHz boost, 3.6GHz base | 65W
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600X – 6-cores, 12-threads | 4.4GHz boost, 3.8GHz base | 95W
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600 – 6-cores, 12-threads | 4.2GHz boost, 3.6GHz base | 65W
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3300X – 4-cores, 8-threads | 4.3GHz boost, 3.5GHz base | 65W
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3400G – 4-cores, 8-threads | 4.2GHz boost, 3.7GHz base | 65W
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3100 – 4-cores, 8-threads | 3.6GHz boost, 3.5GHz base | 65W

At every level, AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation brings better performance and concurrently lowers power consumption over the previous generation. Of course, AMD boasted some benchmarks where it flexed on the competition, but that’s par for the course.

The X570 chipset also marks a generational improvement in computing. Along with the faster processors, the biggest improvement is the support for PCIe 4.0, exclusive to AMD. This new generation of PCIe brings faster graphics cards and SSDs to AMD’s platform. It delivers up to 51% faster SSD performance, along with 69% faster graphics performance – though that will be exclusive to AMD Navi graphics cards for now.

X570 also brings native support to four SuperSpeed USB ports, with a maximum bandwidth of 10Gbps. This will support both USB-A and USB-C connections, and while it’s not as fast as Thunderbolt 3, the native support should lead to wider adoption across desktop motherboards.

Ryzen isn’t just about desktop components. At E3 2019, Microsoft revealed that its follow up to the Xbox, Project Scarlett, will be powered by a custom SoC made of a Zen 2 processor and an AMD Navi GPU. Slated for a "Holiday 2020" release, Project Scarlett is rumored to be four times more powerful than the Xbox One X having the ability to run games at 120FPS and potentially 8K resolutions.

Kevin Lee is the Hardware and Roundups Editor at IGN Entertainment. Prior to IGN Entertainment, he worked at TechRadar.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/amd-ryzen-3rd-generation
Ryzen 7 3700X Install, CPU RGB Control and Temps

TODAY'S BEST DEALS

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is the poster child for the AMD Ryzen 3rd Generationprocessors on the consumer level. Thanks to its new 7nm manufacturing process, it delivers much better performance at a lower power consumption than its predecessor.

It may not come close to surpassing the Ryzen 9 3900X, , especially in multi-threaded workloads, and it has inherited the Ryzen 7 2700X’s 8-core, 16-thread setup. However, it still brings to the table that raw performance for those who are on a limited budget. 

With the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, you’re getting a much more affordable processor that also needs less robust cooling, and it’s simply the best processor for most people. But, don’t take our word for it; read our review to find out exactly what it’s capable of.

Price and availability

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X was rolled out on July 7, 2019 for $329 (£319, AU$519), which puts it in the same general price range as the last-generation Ryzen 7 2700X. This means that at least we're not seeing any considerable price jumps from generation to generation. 

It gets more interesting, however, when you compare the Ryzen 7 3700X to its main competitor. The Intel Core i7-9700K is available for $374 (£384, AU$595), an 8-core processor with no hyperthreading, which means that the Ryzen 7 3700X offers twice the processing threads at a lower price tag. Intel is still king when it comes to single-core performance, but when it comes to multi-core ones, the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is the absolute beast.

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Specs and chipset

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, like the rest of AMD's Zen 2 processors, is built on a 7nm manufacturing node – the smallest in a commercially available CPU. What this means for most people is lower power consumption and much improved performance at the same time. 

This decision to 7nm has brought a beefy 15% boost to IPC (instructions per clock) performance. Effectively, compared to a Ryzen 2nd Generation processor at the same clock speed, you will get a straight 15% increase in performance. That’s not big enough to be evident in day-to-day workloads, but it does still mean something.

The improvements don't just end at IPC. With Ryzen 3rd Generation, as the CPU cores are on their own chiplets, AMD was able to pack way more L2 and L3 cache into the Ryzen 7 3700X – with 4MB and 32MB, respectively. Essentially, this processor has a grand total of 36MB of Cache, which AMD lumps together as 'GameCache'. This GameCache isn't anything entirely new, but it does show that this will help boost gaming performance in some cases – especially in older 1080p esports games. 

The major addition to the 3rd Generation of Ryzen, however, is PCIe 4.0. When paired with an AMD Navi graphics card like the Radeon RX 5700 XT or RX 5700, you'll experience much better performance, thanks to increased bandwidth. 

However, the way we look at it, SSDs are the real stars of the PCIe 4.0 show. Through this superior connection, NVMe SSDs are potentially up to 51% faster than their non-PCIe 4.0 peers. In our own testing, the Aorus PCIe 4.0 SSD that AMD provided was able to get up to 4,996 MB/s sequential read speeds. That’s remarkably fast for an SSD.

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Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-7-3700x

Ryzen release date 3700x amd

Newegg

Pros: -fast -doubled my core/thread count from my 4790k, staggering performance leap in multi core apps, decent improvement in single core. -relatively cheap for the performance -ABBA bios has sorted out voltage, temperature, fan noise, and most importantly...boost clocks.

Cons: -PBO settings can be a little confusing, but i've been on Intel since my last AMD CPU, an athlon x2 3600. -AM4 mounting bracket.....ARRRRRGH

Overall Review: I've waited a long time for a chip worthy to replace my 4790k. And I've waited a REALLY long time for AMD to come out with a challenger. This chip is it. I have (and never had) any temperature issues using stock cooler (with stock TIM), and I have it in a NZXT H510, on top of an Aorus GTX 1080ti. So, I don't really understand why people are having so many temperature issues. The mounting bracket is a PAIN, so maybe TIM is being messed up during installation. Who knows? All I know is that my idle temp is lower with stock cooler than my 4790k at 4.6 was with an H90 AIO. Load temps are almost identical. So, the cooler works very well. If not, you either got a dud chip (RMA) or you're simply doing it wrong. The ABBA bios released recently has upped my boost clock to 4.45 on 3 cores, and 5 cores are within 30mhz of 4.4, whereas previous bios release only 1 or 2 cores boosted anywhere over 4.3, so big big improvement there. It also smooths out the fan ramping up/down, which indeed was somewhat annoying. It also stabilized my voltages, thereby giving me more stable temps. I agree with a prior poster...just about EVERYONE told me that i would see virtually no improvement over my 4790k at 3440x1440p 100hz. WRONG. WRONG. WRONG. BF5 was pegging my CPU, and my 1080ti was at 65-90ish% usage. Now, cpu is like 35% and my 1080ti is 99% in-game. BIG difference in my minimum frames and the stability of my frame rate. I expect this CPU will last me for at least 5 years before I get the upgrade bug (again)...at which point i can step into a 3950x or maybe even a 4000 series (depends on whether socket stays the same, obviously). Unless Intel answers with a stunner in the next few years. I'll support the superior product, regardless of the label on the box. And this CPU is superior to anything Intel at similar costs, and lines up closely with their flagship 9900k, for the most part, at roughly 70% of the cost. Add to that the efficiency, and it's a slam dunk. All in all, i ABSOLUTELY think this is a worthy successor to my trusty and loved 4790k, which served me so well for many years. And I, for one, am glad to be sporting an AMD chip again. If you're in the same boat, I don't think you will be disappointed. I'm not. NO RAGRETS

Sours: https://www.newegg.com/amd-ryzen-7-3700x/p/N82E16819113567
AMD RYZEN 7 OFFICIAL LAUNCH - ALL THE DETAILS!

Ryzen

AMD brand for microprocessors

"Threadripper" redirects here. For the sewing tool, see Seam ripper.

AMD ryzen stylized.svg
LaunchedFebruary 2017 (released March 2, 2017)[1]
Marketed byAdvanced Micro Devices
Designed byAdvanced Micro Devices
Common manufacturer(s)
Max. CPUclock rate3.0 GHz to 4.9 GHz
Min. feature size14 nm to 7 nm
MicroarchitectureZen
Zen+
Zen 2
Zen 3
Instruction setMain processor:
x86-64
MMX(+), SSE1, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4a, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2
AES, CLMUL, RDRAND, SHA, SME
AMD-V, AMD-Vi
AMD Secure Processor:
ARM A5
Transistors
  • 4.8 billion for Zen & Zen+ (per 14/12 nm 8-core "Zeppelin" die)[1]

    5.89 billion (1× CCD) or
    9.69 billion (2× CCD) for Zen 2
    (3.8 billion per 7 nm 8-core "CCD" & 2.09 billion for the 12 nm "I/O die")[2]

    6.24 billion (1x CCD) or
    10.39 billion (2x CCD) for Zen 3
    (4.15 billion per 7 nm 8-core "CCD" & 2.09 billion for the same 12 nm "I/O die")[3]
Cores
Socket(s)
PredecessorFX

Ryzen (RY-zən)[7] is a brand[8] of x86-64microprocessors designed and marketed by Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) for desktop, mobile, server, and embedded platforms based on the Zen microarchitecture. It consists of central processing units (CPUs) marketed for mainstream, enthusiast, server, and workstation segments and accelerated processing units (APUs) marketed for mainstream and entry-level segments and embedded systems applications.

AMD officially announced a new series of processors, named "Ryzen", during its New Horizon summit on December 13, 2016 and introduced Ryzen 1000 series processors in February 2017, featuring up to 8 cores and 16 threads, which launched on March 2, 2017.[9] The second generation of Ryzen processors, the Ryzen 2000 series, features the Zen+ microarchitecture, an incremental improvement built on a 12 nm process technology from GlobalFoundries, was released in April 2018 and featured a marginal 10% total aggregate performance increase (3% IPC, 6% frequency, 10% overall[10]) over Ryzen 1000 processors[11] that first released in 2017.[12] The third generation of Ryzen processors launched on July 7, 2019 and based on AMD's Zen 2 architecture, features more significant design improvements with a 15% IPC boost[13] and a further shrink to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company's (TSMC) 7 nm first generation process. On June 16, 2020, AMD announced new Ryzen 3000 series XT processors with 4% higher boost clocks versus non XT processors.[14] On October 8, 2020, AMD announced the highly anticipated Zen 3 architecture for their Ryzen 5000 series processors, featuring a 19% instructions per cycle (IPC) improvement over Zen 2, while being built on the same 7 nm TSMC node with reported 5 GHz[15] boost operating frequencies in the wild.[16] With the launch of Zen 3 via the Ryzen 5000 series, AMD has taken the gaming performance crown from Intel, and is an important performance milestone in itself as gaming performance is based on single thread performance[17] above all else.[18]

A majority of AMD's consumer Ryzen products use the Socket AM4 platform. In August 2017, AMD launched their Ryzen Threadripper line aimed at the enthusiast workstation market. AMD Ryzen Threadripper uses the larger TR4, sTRX4, and sWRX8 sockets, which support additional memory channels and PCI Express lanes.

In December 2019, AMD started producing first generation Ryzen products built using the second generation Zen+ architecture.[19] The most notable example is Ryzen 5 1600, with newest batches, having "AF" identifier instead of its usual "AE", being essentially a rebadged Ryzen 5 2600 with the same specifications as the original Ryzen 5 1600.

History[edit]

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X top and pins

Ryzen and the fundamental "Zen" CPU microarchitecture its uses were especially significant for AMD since it was a completely new, "from scratch" design and marked the corporation's return to the high-end CPU market after a decade of near-total absence since 2006, the launch of Intel Core in the DDR2 era.[20] This is because AMD's primary competitor Intel had largely dominated this market segment starting from the 2006 release of their Core microarchitecture (marketed as "Core 2"), after abandoning the Pentium 4's extremely uncompetitive (with AMD's Athlon XP and Athlon 64) Netburst microarchitecture for an upgraded version of the prior Pentium 3, which notably continues to underpin Intel's CPU designs to this very day.[21]

Until Ryzen's initial launch in the spring of 2017, Intel's market dominance over AMD would only continue to increase as simultaneously with the above top-to-bottom launch of the now famous "Intel Core" CPU lineup and branding, was the successful roll out of their well known "tick-tock" CPU release strategy. This then brand new release strategy was most famous for alternating between a new CPU microarchitecture and a new fabrication node each and every year; with it being something that over time would eventually become a release cadence they'd manage to stick to for almost an entire decade (specifically lasting from Intel Core's initial summer 2006 launch with 65 nm Conroe, all the way until the 14 nm Broadwell desktop CPUs were delayed a year from a planned 2014 launch out to summer 2015 instead. This would necessitate a refresh of their pre-existing 22 nm Haswell CPU lineup instead, and thus officially end "tick-tock" as a practice).[22][23] And it's for these same exact reasons that this became incredibly important for AMD, as Intel's inability to further sustain "tick-tock" past around 2014 would prove absolutely critical, if not outright essential in providing both the initial and continually growing market openings for their Ryzen CPUs and the Zen CPU microarchitecture in general to succeed.

Also of note is the release of AMD's Bulldozer microarchitecture in 2011, which despite being a clean sheet CPU design like Zen, had been optimized for parallel computing above all else, which was then still very much in its infancy (which led to starkly inferior real-world performance in any workload that wasn't highly threaded) and thus ended up uncompetitive in basically every area outside of raw multithreading and its use in low power APUs with integrated Radeon graphics.[24] Despite a die shrink and several revisions of the Bulldozer architecture, performance and power efficiency failed to catch up with Intel's competing products.[25] Cumulatively, all of this practically forced AMD to abandon the entire high-end CPU market (including desktop, laptops, and server/enterprise) until Ryzen's release in spring 2017.

Ryzen is the consumer-level implementation of the newer Zen microarchitecture, a complete redesign that marked the return of AMD to the high-end CPU market, offering a product stack able to compete with Intel at every level.[26][27] Having more processing cores, Ryzen processors offer greater multi-threaded performance at the same price point relative to Intel's Core processors.[28] The Zen architecture delivers more than 52% improvement in instructions per cycle (clock) over the prior-generation Bulldozer AMD core, without raising power use.[29] The changes to instruction set also makes it binary-compatible with Intel's Broadwell, smoothing the transition for users.[30]

Threadripper, which is geared for high performance desktops (HEDT), wasn't developed as part of a business plan or a specific roadmap; instead, a small enthusiast team inside AMD saw an opportunity that something could be developed between the Ryzen and Epyc CPU roadmaps that would put the crown of performance on AMD. After some progress was made in their spare time, the project was greenlit and put in an official roadmap by 2016.[31]

Since the release of Ryzen, AMD's CPU market share has increased while Intel's appears to have stagnated and/or regressed.[32]

Features[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Product lineup[edit]

Ryzen 1000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

  • Socket AM4 for Ryzen and Socket TR4 for Ryzen Threadripper.[33][34]
  • Based on first generation Zen. Ryzen CPUs based on Summit Ridge architecture. Threadripper based on Whitehaven architecture.
  • 4.8 billion transistors per 192 mm2[35] 8-core "Zeppelin" die[1] with one die being used for Ryzen and two for Ryzen Threadripper.
  • Stepping: B1[36]
  • Memory support:
    • Ryzen dual-channel: DDR4–2666 ×2 single rank, DDR4–2400 ×2 dual rank, DDR4–2133 ×4 single rank, or DDR4–1866 ×4 dual rank.[33][37]
    • Ryzen Threadripper quad-channel: DDR4–2666 ×4 single rank, DDR4–2400 ×4 dual rank, DDR4–2133 ×8 single rank, or DDR4–1866 ×8 dual rank.
  • Instructions Sets: x87, MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AES, CLMUL, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2, SHA.[30]
  • All Ryzen-branded CPUs (except Pro variants) feature unlocked multipliers.
  • AMD's SenseMI Technology monitors the processor continuously and uses Infinity Control Fabric to offer the following features:[33][38][39]
    • Pure Power reduces the entire ramp of processor voltage and clock speed, for light loads.
    • Precision Boost increases the processor voltage and clock speed by 100–200 MHz if three or more cores are active (five or more, in the case of Threadripper, and by 300 MHz); and significantly further when less than three are active (less than five, in the case of Threadripper).[40]
    • XFR (eXtended Frequency Range) aims to maintain the average clock speed closer to the maximum Precision Boost, when sufficient cooling is available.[41]
    • Neural Net Prediction and Smart Prefetch use perceptron based neural branch prediction inside the processor to optimize instruction workflow and cache management.
  • Ryzen launched in conjunction with a line of stock coolers for Socket AM4: the Wraith Stealth, Wraith Spire and Wraith Max. This line succeeds the original AMD Wraith cooler, which was released in mid-2016.[42] The Wraith Stealth is a bundled low-profile unit meant for the lower-end CPUs with a rating for a TDP of 65 W, whereas the Wraith Spire is the bundled mainstream cooler with a TDP rating of 95 W, along with optional RGB lighting on certain models. The Wraith Max is a larger cooler incorporating heatpipes, rated at 140 W TDP.
Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory support[ii]TDP
Base PBO

XFR[43]
L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200[44]July 27, 2017
US $109
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD4 (4) 2 × 2 3.1 3.4
(3.1)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 1200 [45]July 27, 2017
OEM
3.1 3.4
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 Pro 1300 [46]July 27, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 1300X[47]July 27, 2017
US $129
3.5 3.7
(3.5)
3.9
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 1400 [48]April 11, 2017
US $169
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD4 (8) 2 × 2 3.2 3.4
(3.4)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 1500 [49]April 11, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
? 2 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen 5 1500X[50]April 11, 2017
US $189
3.5 3.7
(3.6)
3.9
Ryzen 5 1600 [51]April 11, 2017
US $219
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.2 3.6
(3.4)
3.7
Ryzen 5 Pro 1600 [52]April 11, 2017
OEM
3.2 3.6
(?)
?
Ryzen 5 1600X [53]April 11, 2017
US $249
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1 95 W
Performance
Ryzen 7 1700 [54]March 2, 2017
US $329
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD8 (16) 2 × 4 3.0 3.7
(3.2)
3.75 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 1700 [55]March 2, 2017
OEM
3.0 3.8
(?)
?
Ryzen 7 1700X [56]March 2, 2017
US $399
3.4 3.8
(3.5)
3.9 95 W
Ryzen 7 1800X [57]March 2, 2017
US $499
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 1900X [58]August 31, 2017
US $549
GloFo
14LP
2 × CCD[iii]8 (16) 2 × 4 3.8 4.0
(3.9)
4.2 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
TR464 (60+4) DDR4-2667
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 1920X [59]August 10, 2017
US $799
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.0 4.2 4 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper 1950X [60]August 10, 2017
US $999
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.4 4.0
(3.7)
4.2
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^Official Support per AMD. CPU's are unlocked for different memory speeds.
  3. ^Processor package actually contains two additional inactive dies to provide structural support to the integrated heat spreader.

Ryzen 2000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

The first Ryzen 2000 CPUs, based on the 12 nm Zen+ microarchitecture, were announced for preorder on April 13, 2018[61] and launched six days later. Zen+ based Ryzen CPUs are based on Pinnacle Ridge architecture,[62] while Threadripper CPUs are based on the Colfax microarchitecture. The first of the 2000 series of Ryzen Threadripper products, introducing Precision Boost Overdrive technology,[41] followed in August. The Ryzen 7 2700X was bundled with the new Wraith Prism cooler.

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core Config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory
support
TDP
Base PB2L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200 AF
(12 nm refresh)[63]
April, 2020
US $60
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD4 (4) 1 × 4 3.1 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 2300X [64]September 10, 2018
OEM
3.5 4.0
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 2500X [65]September 10, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD4 (8) 1 × 4 3.6 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600E [66]September 2018
OEM
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.1 4.0 16 MB
8 MB per CCX
DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 5 1600 AF
(12 nm refresh)[67]
October 11, 2019
US $85
3.2 3.6 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600 [68]April 19, 2018
US $199
3.4 3.9
Ryzen 5 2600X [69]April 19, 2018
US $229
3.6 4.2 95 W
November 23, 2018
UK £221.99
Performance
Ryzen 7 2700E [70]September 11, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD8 (16) 2 × 4 2.8 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 7 2700 [71]April 19, 2018
US $299
3.2 4.1 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
November 23, 2018
UK £285.49
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700 [72]April 2018
OEM
3.2 4.1
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700X [73]September 6, 2018
OEM
3.6 4.1 95 W
Ryzen 7 2700X [74]April 19, 2018
US $329
3.7 4.3 105 W
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 2920X [75]October 2018
US $649
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
2 × CCD12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.3 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
8 MB per CCX
TR464 (60+4) DDR4-2933
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2950X [76]August 31, 2018
US $899
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5 4.4
Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX [77]October 2018
US $1299
4 × CCD24 (48) 8 × 3 3.0 4.2 64 MB
8 MB per CCX
250 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX [78]August 13, 2018
US $1799
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.0 4.2
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX

APUs[edit]

See also: AMD Accelerated Processing Unit

Desktop[edit]

In January 2018, AMD announced the first two Ryzen desktop APUs with integrated Radeon Vega graphics under the Raven Ridge codename. These were based on first generation Zen architecture. The Ryzen 3 2200G and the Ryzen 5 2400G were released in February.[79]

Mobile[edit]

In May 2017, AMD demonstrated a Ryzen mobile APU with four Zen CPU cores and Radeon Vega-based GPU.[88] The first Ryzen mobile APUs, codenamed Raven Ridge, were officially released in October 2017.[89]

  • 4.95 billion[90] transistors on a 210 mm2 die,[90] based on a modified 14 nm Zeppelin die where four of the cores are replaced by an integrated fifth-generation GCN-based GPU.
  • Precision Boost 2[62]
  • 16 external PCIe 3.0 lanes (four each to chipset and M.2 socket; eight to a PCIe slot). 16 internal PCIe 3.0 lanes for the integrated GPU and on-board input/output (I/O).[citation needed] In 2019, AMD released some new dual core Zen mobile parts branded as 300 or 3000, codenamed Dali.
Model Release
date
FabCPU GPU SocketPCIe lanes Memory supportTDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel Config[i]Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 2200U[91]January 8, 2018 GloFo
14LP
2 (4) 2.5 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 3 192:12:4
3 CU [92]
1100 MHz 422.4 FP5 12 (8+4) DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 3 3200U[93]January 6, 2019 2.6 3.5 1200 MHz 460.8
Ryzen 3 2300U[94]January 8, 2018 4 (4) 2.0 3.4 Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU [95]
1100 MHz 844.8
Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U[96]May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 5 2500U[98]October 26, 2017[98]4 (8) 3.6 Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU [99]
1126.4
Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U[100]May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 5 2600H[101]September 10, 2018[102]3.2 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
Ryzen 7 2700U[103]October 26, 2017[103]2.2 3.8 Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU [104]
1300 MHz 1664 DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U[105]May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 7 2800H[101]September 10, 2018[102]3.3 Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1830.4 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
Embedded[edit]
Great Horned Owl[edit]

In February 2018, AMD announced the V1000 series of embedded Zen+ Vega APUs, based on the Great Horned Owl architecture, with four SKUs.[106]

Banded Kestrel[edit]

In April 2019, AMD announced another line of embedded Zen+Vega APUs, namely the Ryzen Embedded R1000 series with two SKUs.[108]

Ryzen 3000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

On May 27, 2019, at Computex in Taipei, AMD launched its third generation Ryzen processors which use AMD's Zen 2 architecture. For this generation's microarchitectures, Ryzen uses Matisse, while Threadripper uses Castle Peak. The chiplet design separates the CPU cores, fabricated on TSMC's 7FF process, and the I/O, fabricated on GlobalFoundries' 12 nm process, and connects them via Infinity Fabric.[110] The Ryzen 3000 series uses the AM4 socket similar to earlier models and is the first CPU to offer PCI Express 4.0 (PCIe) connectivity.[111] The new architecture offers a 15% instruction-per-clock (IPC) uplift and a reduction in energy usage. Other improvements include a doubling of the L3 cache size, a re-optimized L1 instruction cache, a larger micro-operations cache, double the floating point performance, improved branch prediction, and better instruction pre-fetching.[110] The 6-, 8- and 12-core CPUs became generally available on July 7, 2019, and 24-core processors were launched in November.[112]

The Ryzen Threadripper 3990X, part of Castle Peak generation of CPUs, has currently[when?] the world's largest number of both cores and threads available in consumer-oriented CPUs - 64 and 128, respectively.[citation needed] The competing Intel Core i9-10980XE processor has only 18 cores and 36 threads. Another competitor, the workstation-oriented Intel Xeon W-3275 and W-3275M, has 28 cores, 56 threads, and cost more when launched.[citation needed]

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)[ii]
Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 3100[113]April 21, 2020
$99
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
4 (8) 2 × 2 3.6 3.9 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 3300X[114]April 21, 2020
$120
1 × 4 3.8 4.3 16 MB
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 3500 November 15, 2019
OEM (West)
Japan ¥16000[115]
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
6 (6) 2 × 3 3.6 4.1 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 3500X[116]October 8, 2019
China ¥1099
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen 5 3600[117]July 7, 2019
US $199
6 (12) 3.6 4.2
Ryzen 5 Pro 3600[118]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 5 3600X[119]July 7, 2019
US $249
3.8 4.4 95 W
Ryzen 5 3600XT[120]July 7, 2020
US $249
4.5
Performance
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700[121]September 30, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.6 4.4 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W[iii]
Ryzen 7 3700X[123]July 7, 2019
US $329
Ryzen 7 3800X[124]July 7, 2019
US $399
3.9 4.5 105 W
Ryzen 7 3800XT[125]July 7, 2020
US $399
4.7
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 3900[126]October 8, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.1 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 Pro 3900[127]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 9 3900X[128]July 7, 2019
US $499
3.8 4.6 105 W[iv]
Ryzen 9 3900XT[129]July 7, 2020
US $499
4.7
Ryzen 9 3950X[130]November 25, 2019
US $749
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5
High-End Desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 3960X[131]November 25, 2019
US $1399
TSMC
7FF
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
24 (48) 8 × 3 3.8 4.5 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
128 MB
16 MB per CCX
sTRX464 (56+8) DDR4-3200
quad-channel
280 W[v]
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X[133]November 25, 2019
US $1999
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.7 4.5
Ryzen Threadripper 3990X[134]February 7, 2020
US $3990
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.9 4.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
Workstation
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3945WX[135]July 14, 2020
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 4.0 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
sWRX8 128 (120+8) DDR4-3200
octa-channel
280 W
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX[136]July 14, 2020
OEM
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.9
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX[137]July 14, 2020
OEM
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.5 4.2 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX[138]July 14, 2020
OEM
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.7 4.2 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^The chipset itself provides additional user-accessible PCIe lanes and integrated PCIe devices, see AM4 chipsets.
  3. ^Ryzen 7 3700X may consume over 90 W under load.[122]
  4. ^Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X may consume over 145 W under load.[122]
  5. ^Ryzen Threadripper 3990X may consume over 490 W under load.[132]


The 4-, 6- and 8-core processors have one core chiplet. The 12- and 16-core processors have two core chiplets. In all cases the I/O die is the same.[110]

The Threadripper 24- and 32-core processors have four core chiplets. The 64-core processor has eight core chiplets. All Threadripper processors use the same I/O die.

APUs[edit]

Both mobile and desktop APUs are based on the Picasso microarchitecture, a 12 nm refresh of Raven Ridge, offering a modest increase in clock speeds (up to an additional 300 MHz maximum boost), Precision Boost 2, an up to 3% increase in IPC from the move to the Zen+ core with its reduced cache and memory latencies, and newly added solder thermal interface material for the desktop parts.[139]

Desktop[edit]
Mobile[edit]

In 2019, AMD first released the Ryzen 3000 APUs, consisting only of quad core parts. Then in January 2020, they announced value dual core mobile parts, codenamed Dalí, including the Ryzen 3 3250U.

Ryzen 4000[edit]

APUs[edit]

The Ryzen 4000 APUs are based on Renoir, a refresh of the Zen 2 Matisse CPU cores, coupled with Radeon Vega GPU cores. They were released only to OEM manufacturers in mid-2020. Unlike Matisse, Renoir does not support PCIe 4.0.[155]

Ryzen Pro 4x50G APUs are the same as 4x00G APUs, except they are bundled a Wraith Stealth cooler and are not OEM-only.[156] It is possible this is a listing mistake, since 4x50G CPUs are unavailable on retail (as of Oct. 2020) and PRO SKUs are usually the OEM only parts.

Desktop[edit]
Mobile[edit]

Zen 2 APUs, based on the 7 nm Renoir microarchitecture, commercialized as Ryzen 4000.[158][159][160]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU SocketPCIe
lanes
Memory supportTDP
FabTransistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 4300U[161][162]March 16, 2020 TSMC
7FF
9,800 156 4 (4) 1 × 4 2.7 3.7 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
320:20:8
5 CU
1400 MHz 896 FP6 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 4450U[163]May 7, 2020 4 (8) 2.5
Ryzen 5 4500U[164][165]March 16, 2020 6 (6) 2 × 3 2.3 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152
Ryzen 5 4600U[166]6 (12) 2.1
Ryzen 5 PRO 4650U[167]May 7, 2020
Ryzen 5 4680U[168]April 13, 2021 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1344
Ryzen 5 4600HS[169]March 16, 2020 3.0 AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1152 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H[170][171]35–54 W
Ryzen 7 4700U[172]8 (8) 2 × 4 2.0 4.1 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U[173]May 7, 2020 8 (16) 1.7
Ryzen 7 4800U[174]March 16, 2020 1.8 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792
Ryzen 7 4980U[175]April 13, 2021 2.0 4.4 1950 MHz 1996.8
Ryzen 7 4800HS[176]March 16, 2020 2.9 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 35 W
Ryzen 7 4800H[177][178]35–54 W
Ryzen 9 4900HS[179]3 4.3 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792 35 W
Ryzen 9 4900H[180]3.3 4.4 35–54 W
Embedded[edit]
Grey Hawk[edit]

In November 2020, AMD announced the V2000 series of embedded Zen 2 Vega APUs.

Ryzen 5000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

The desktop Ryzen 5000 series, based on the Zen 3 microarchitecture, was announced on October 8, 2020.[184][185] They use the same 7 nm manufacturing process, which has matured slightly, as usual.[186] Mainstream Ryzen 5000 CPU cores are codenamed Vermeer. Enthusiast/workstation Threadripper 5000 CPU cores were codenamed Genesis, later renamed to Chagall.[citation needed]

  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX.

APUs[edit]

In contrast to their CPU counterparts, the APUs consist of single dies with integrated graphics and smaller caches. The APUs, codenamed Cezanne, forgo PCIe 4.0 support to keep power consumption low.[193]

Desktop[edit]
Mobile[edit]

Oddly numbered models like the 5300U, 5500U and 5700U are Zen 2 based (codename Lucienne), while 5400U, 5600U and 5800U are Zen 3 based (codename Cezanne). HX models are unlocked, allowing them to be overclocked like Intel Core i9-xxxxxHK processors. SMT is now standard across the lineup unlike the 4000-series Ryzen Mobile.

Initial reception[edit]

The first Ryzen 7 (1700, 1700X, and 1800X) processors debuted in early March 2017 and were generally well received by hardware reviewers.[224][225][226] Ryzen was the first brand new architecture from AMD in five years, and without very much initial fine-tuning or optimization, it ran generally well for reviewers.[227] Initial Ryzen chips ran well with software and games already on the market, performing exceptionally well in workstation scenarios, and well in most gaming scenarios. Compared to Piledriver-powered FX chips, Zen-powered Ryzen chips ran cooler, much faster, and used less power. IPC uplift was eventually gauged to be 52% higher than Excavator, which was two full generations ahead of the architecture still being used in AMD's FX-series desktop predecessors like the FX-8350 and FX-8370.[1] Though Zen fell short of Intel's Kaby Lake in terms of IPC, and therefore single-threaded throughput, it compensated by offering more cores to applications that can use them. Power consumption and heat emission were found to be competitive with Intel, and the included Wraith coolers were generally competitive with higher-priced aftermarket units.

Ryzen 1800X's multi-threaded performance, in some cases while using Blender or other open-source software, was around four times the performance of the FX-8370, or nearly double that of the i7 7700K.[228] One reviewer found that Ryzen chips would usually outperform competing Intel i7 processors for a fraction of the price when all eight cores are used.[228]

However, one complaint among a subset of reviewers was that Ryzen processors lagged their Intel counterparts when running older games, or some newer games at mainstream resolutions such as 720p or 1080p.[229] AMD acknowledged the gaming performance deficit at low resolutions during a Reddit "Ask Me Anything" thread, where it explained that updates and patches were being developed.[230] Subsequent updates to Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Rise of the Tomb Raider increased frame rates by 17–31% on Ryzen systems.[231][232] In April 2017, developer id Software announced that, in the future, its games would exploit the greater parallelism available on Ryzen CPUs.[233]

It has been suggested that low threaded applications often result in Ryzen processors being underused, yielding lower than expected benchmark scores, because Zen relies on its core count to make up for its lower IPC rating than that of Kaby Lake.[234][235][236] However, AMD and others have argued thread scheduling is not the fundamental issue to Windows 10 performance.[238] Early AM4 motherboards were also hindered by BIOS bugs and poor DDR4 memory support.[citation needed]

Operating system support[edit]

Windows[edit]

AMD verified that computers with Ryzen CPUs can boot Windows 7 and Windows 8 both 64- and 32-bit but on newer hardware, including AMD Ryzen and Intel Kaby Lake and later, Microsoft only officially supports the use of Windows 10. Windows Update blocks updates from being installed on newer systems running older versions of Windows, though that restriction can be circumvented with an unofficial patch.[239]

Although AMD initially announced that Ryzen chipset drivers would not be provided for Windows 7,[240] its chipset driver packages do in fact list and include them.[241]

As of June 2021, 1st Generation Ryzen CPUs, (including the newer Zen+ "AF" version) are not supported on Windows 11.[242][243]

Linux[edit]

Full support for Ryzen processors' performance features in Linux requires kernel version 4.10 or newer.[244]

Known issues[edit]

Spectre[edit]

Like nearly all modern high performance microprocessors, Ryzen was susceptible to the "Spectre" vulnerabilities. The vulnerabilities can be mitigated without hardware changes via microcode updates and operating system workarounds, but the mitigations incur a performance penalty.[245] AMD Ryzen and Epyc suffer up to 9% penalty from the mitigations, depending on workload, comparing favorably with a penalty of in some cases more than 50% for Intel Core and Xeon processors,[246]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryzen

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