Blue roan steer

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The 1045 Ludlow Road farm owned by Brandon’s grandparents, Mary Ann and James Barr, was badly damaged in the April 3, 2018, tornado and again this year during the Memorial Day tornado outbreak in the Dayton region.

Waylon is a shorthorn steer which survived two tornadoes at this farm owned by James and Mary Ann Barr at 1045 Ludlow Road in Beavercreek Township. When the steer was a calf the barn he was in was badly damaged in a tornado on April 3, 2018. On Monday, May 27, 2019, the Barr’s farm was struck by a tornado again, tearing off the doors of the barn where Waylon and a heifer were kept, damaging another building and demolishing the roof of the Barr’s home. None of the Barr’s 25-head of cattle were injured in either tornado. PHOTOS by Lynn Hulsey
Caption

Waylon is a shorthorn steer which survived two tornadoes at this farm owned by James and Mary Ann Barr at 1045 Ludlow Road in Beavercreek Township. When the steer was a calf the barn he was in was badly damaged in a tornado on April 3, 2018. On Monday, May 27, 2019, the Barr’s farm was struck by a tornado again, tearing off the doors of the barn where Waylon and a heifer were kept, damaging another building and demolishing the roof of the Barr’s home. None of the Barr’s 25-head of cattle were injured in either tornado. PHOTOS by Lynn Hulsey

Waylon and Dolly were in a barn that had its door ripped off by the May 27 tornado, which also tore the roof from his grandparent’s house, and smashed the door of a barn built to replace a garage demolished in the 2018 tornado.

RELATED: Volunteers pitch in to clear away tornado debris in Dayton region

“I was very worried about them. They are my babies. They’re very important to me,” said Brandon. “He seems to be perfectly fine. He’s just his normal self. It’s a huge weight off my shoulders now that he’s fine.”

This aerial photo shows the farm of James and Mary Ann Barr, 1045 Ludlow Rd., Beavercreek Twp. after it was badly damaged in an April 3, 2018. On Monday, May 27, 2019 another tornado damaged the farm. WHIO drone photo
Caption

This aerial photo shows the farm of James and Mary Ann Barr, 1045 Ludlow Rd., Beavercreek Twp. after it was badly damaged in an April 3, 2018. On Monday, May 27, 2019 another tornado damaged the farm. WHIO drone photo

Most of the farm’s 25 head of cattle were in a pasture when the tornado hit and none were injured.

Brandon’s dad, Jeff Barr, said the 2018 tornado was a close call for Brandon as well as all the cattle located in and around the 1850’s-era barn that was so badly damaged it had to be replaced.

RELATED: 2018 tornadoes do damage in Greene and Clark counties

He said normally Brandon would have been in the cattle barn at the time of the tornado, but his uncle had taken him and his grandparents out to dinner so no one was home when it hit.

“I got home and the barn where all the cattle were — the roof was ripped off (and) my silo was knocked down,” said Jeff. “Basically where the silo fell if it fell 20 feet to the left it would have taken out the barn and probably killed every cow.”

Brandon Barr, 16, and Waylon, a shorthorn steer, who survived two tornadoes at this farm owned by James and Mary Ann Barr at 1045 Ludlow Road in Beavercreek Township. When the steer was a calf the barn he was in was badly damaged in a tornado on April 3, 2018. On Monday, May 27, 2019, the Barr’s farm was struck by a tornado again, tearing off the doors of the barn where Waylon and a heifer were kept, damaging another building and demolishing the roof of the Barr’s home. None of the Barr’s 25-head of cattle were injured in either tornado. PHOTOS by Lynn Hulsey
Caption

Brandon Barr, 16, and Waylon, a shorthorn steer, who survived two tornadoes at this farm owned by James and Mary Ann Barr at 1045 Ludlow Road in Beavercreek Township. When the steer was a calf the barn he was in was badly damaged in a tornado on April 3, 2018. On Monday, May 27, 2019, the Barr’s farm was struck by a tornado again, tearing off the doors of the barn where Waylon and a heifer were kept, damaging another building and demolishing the roof of the Barr’s home. None of the Barr’s 25-head of cattle were injured in either tornado. PHOTOS by Lynn Hulsey

In June Waylon and Dolly will be heading with Brandon to the American Shorthorn Association’s Junior National competition in Tennessee. Then it will be on to the Greene County Fair.

It is not known if his luck will hold beyond the fair, as the Barr Family Farm’s shorthorn cattle are raised for beef.

Asked if there may be possible reprieve for Waylon, Mary Ann Barr smiled and said, “He’ll be sold.”

News Center 7 Reporter Sean Cudahy contributed to this report.

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Sours: https://www.daytondailynews.com/news/local/tornado-proof-red-roan-steer-survives-two-twisters/wZVewoT1xGfiTtypMX7JMN/

Producing Blue Roans

Do you know how I know you are buying cattle for kids, specifically young girls?

You like blue roans.

Chicks love blue roans.

They’re just as easy to sell as they are hard to win with.

For various reasons, we tend to have one blue roan born each year.  One year we had a runt, short made, unsound one that we were absolutely not going to sell to somebody.  In fact, knowing a family with two daughters was coming in to buy some replacements, I had her put in a field no less than 50 yards away.  They found that piece of crap like Mack Brown finds overrated high school QBs.

There’s no legitimate market reason to like blue roans.  It's not reliable for producing a CAB premium and there's nothing about a blue roan that makes it have any sort of better performance than another color.

It’s 100% “I want the pretty one” or “I want to sell to the people that want the pretty one”.  Even Shorthorn breeders look at them and wonder why you base your herd on what your wife and daughters think is pretty.

You can’t “start a herd of blue roan cattle”.  Even if your entire herd is blue roans, at best they only have a 50% chance to produce a blue.  That's not just abstract pondering or exaggeration, it's genetics.  Over time, a herd of 100% blue roan cattle will only produce the blue color pattern in 50% of their calves.  And even THAT assumes you've gotten rid of the red gene.

It doesn’t make sense.

To continue the piling on, I don't know if there's any validity to it but every blue roan I've seen down here has had issues with heat stress.

Anyway, I digress, the genetics aren’t hard, I’m not sure why it’s continually debated on the forums.

If somebody leaves out the fact that white cattle can be either homozygous black, heterozygous black, or red when giving you advice, just stop listening.

The next time you stop listening to your Taylor Swift albums while talking about the cutest boys at school and you start to wonder how you can produce blue roans, here's a fairly comprehensive chart...

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Sours: https://www.cattle.com/read.aspx?id=2710
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