2021 duramax review

2021 duramax review DEFAULT

Overview

Heavy-duty pickup trucks are built to do the jobs that their half-ton counterparts can't, and the 2021 Chevy Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD are no exception. Although they share a nameplate with the smaller Silverado 1500, they alone offer a Duramax V-8 with 910 lb-ft of torque and a max tow rating of 36,000 pounds. The biggest Chevy trucks also pack a host of trailer-assistance technology that helps them compete with the Ford Super Duty and Ram HD lineups. Despite the Silverado HD's myriad configurations, including a spacious crew cab, even the most expensive versions can't match the opulence of the fanciest Ford or Ram interior. Still, the Chevy's bodywork is arguably the boldest in the class, albeit less classy than its corporate cousin, the GMC Sierra HD. Combine that with its immense capabilities and desirable features and you have the 2021 Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD.

What's New for 2021?

Along with a slew of new trailer-towing technology and special editions, the 2021 Silverado HD now has a higher maximum tow rating of 36,000 pounds. Available only on a properly equipped Silverado 3500HD, Chevy said it increased last year's max rating by 500 pounds by updating the truck's suspension hardware and wheel packaging. Highlighting the new tech is a jackknife alert that does what its name suggests, a trailer-length indicator that helps the driver change lanes when pulling something, and a cargo-bed view enhancement that makes it easier to hook up a fifth-wheel trailer. The latest list of Silverado HD special editions includes a blacked-out Midnight Edition, a monochromatic Z71 Sport Edition, a glitzy Z71 Chrome Edition, and a Carhartt Special Edition. The latter boasts copious Carhartt badges, exclusive Mosaic Black paint with pinstripe detailing, two-tone black and Carhartt brown leather upholstery, and a soft tonneau cover.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

We'd choose the 2500HD with the crew cab and the standard cargo bed. We'd also add all-wheel drive and the refined Duramax diesel powertrain to the LT trim level. We'd recommend the Z71 Off-Road package (18-inch wheels, all-terrain tires, spray-in bedliner, upgraded suspension, underbody protection) for enhanced styling and improved capability. We'd also choose the Convenience package for its desirable features. These include a 10-way power driver's seat, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats, LED cargo-bed lighting, a heated steering wheel, remote start, and more. Finally, the Safety package makes this beast easier to live with thanks to blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and front and rear parking sensors.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD have a standard gas-powered 6.6-liter V-8 that makes 401 horsepower and 464 lb-ft of torque and mates to a six-speed automatic transmission. The optional Duramax diesel 6.6-liter V-8 carries over from the previous generation. It continues to make 445 horsepower and 910 lb-ft, but now it hooks up to an Allison 10-speed automatic. These engines pair with rear- or all-wheel drive, and each is compatible with the single- or dual-rear-wheel axle. We drove both powertrains through mountains while towing several tons and were impressed by their capabilities. The gas engine and six-speed automatic worked well together to control the truck's speed, which is especially important when towing on steep grades. Still, the Duramax powertrain is the one to get for those who regularly tow heavy loads. Its mighty power and the transmission's effortless responses provided an extra level of confidence and security when doing what these trucks were made for—moving mountains. However, the heavy-duty Silverado's lack of steering accuracy and feedback—even when equipped with the electric-assist system—was less reassuring. Still, the big Chevy rides surprisingly well for its impressive capabilities.

Towing and Payload Capacity

Heavy-duty trucks are judged by their maximum towing and payload ratings, even if those massive loads are never actually tested by most people. The gas-powered Silverado HD can tow up to 17,400 pounds, and the diesel version can pull up to 36,000 pounds. Likewise, the strongest Silverado 3500HD with the regular cab and dual-rear-wheel axle can carry up to 7442 pounds of payload.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Since the EPA doesn't test vehicles as heavy as the Silverado HD and its colossal competitors, we can only judge their real-world mpg on our 75-mph highway fuel-economy route. We tested the Silverado 2500HD with the gasoline 6.6-liter V-8, and it earned 14 mpg on the highway. For comparison, we tested an F-250 with the gas-fed 6.2-liter V-8 and six-speed automatic transmission, and it returned 15 mpg in the same test. The diesel Silverado 2500HD managed 19 mpg on the highway, as did the Ram 2500 we last tested.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

Pickup trucks have a wide spectrum of interior configurations and available technology. The heavy-duty Silverado runs the gamut from stripped-down work truck to dressed-up crew cab. All feature a mountainous dashboard packed with easy-to-use switchgear. The Chevy's crew-cab, short-box setup has a longer wheelbase than the previous generation and provides increased passenger space. While even the fanciest models can't match the material quality and sophistication of the Ram HD, the Silverado's cabin and features still manage to transcend typical truck luxuries. The most desirable content includes heated and ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, a heated steering wheel, a head-up display, and more. The Chevy is packed with copious interior cubby storage that's highlighted by a giant center-console bin. Some models can also be equipped with a storage compartment under the back seat and bins built into the backs of the rear-seat cushions.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Every Silverado HD comes with a touchscreen that supports Chevy's Infotainment 3 software, which includes standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It features a useful volume and tuning knob as well as some physical buttons and voice commands that supplement the touch-sensitive display. A larger 8.0-inch touchscreen with a seven-speaker Bose audio system, additional power points, SiriusXM satellite radio, a Wi-Fi hotspot, and wireless charging is available, too. Its infotainment system also allows users to store different trailer profiles to monitor maintenance and even control trailer functions via a smartphone app.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The 2021 Silverado HD hasn't been crash-tested by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Still, every model is available with a host of driver-assistance technology, and there are several trailer-specific assists that make towing easier. There's even a useful multiview camera system that includes a transparent mode that makes maneuvering in parking lots and merging onto the highway easier when towing by allowing the driver to virtually see through the trailer. Other key safety features include:

  • Available forward-collision warning and automated emergency braking
  • Available blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert
  • Available lane-departure

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Chevy covers the Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD with a competitive warranty that matches competitors from Ford and Ram. Every heavy-duty Silverado also gets one complimentary scheduled maintenance visit.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • Complimentary maintenance is covered for the first visit

Specifications

Specifications

2020 Chevrolet Silverado 2500/3500

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, rear- or rear/all-wheel-drive, 2–6-passenger, 2- or 4-door pickup

BASE PRICES
$35,695–$64,095

ENGINES
pushrod 16-valve 6.6-liter V-8, 401 hp, 464 lb-ft; turbocharged and intercooled pushrod 32-valve 6.6-liter diesel V-8, 445 hp, 910 lb-ft

TRANSMISSIONS
10-speed automatic with manual shifting mode, 6-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 141.5–172.0 in
Length: 235.5–266.0 in
Width: 81.9–96.7 in
Height: 79.8 in
Passenger volume: 69–139 cu ft
Curb weight: 6100–8050 lb

PERFORMANCE (C/D EST)
Zero to 60 mph: 6.1–6.6 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.7–15.1 sec
Top speed: 95–98 mph

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More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/chevrolet/silverado-2500hd-3500hd-2021

Ah, somebody better tell Chevy that mileage is supposed to get better each subsequent year, not worse. Because the 2021 Silverado with Duramax diesel and four-wheel-drive dropped three miles-per-gallon in Highway driving over 2020. So that diesel and 4WD combo have worse mileage for 2021 than in 2020. But Chevy says nothing has really changed from 2020 (though we wish they would have changed the front end).

So what happened? The two-wheel-drive Duramax Silverado did not change any figures from last year, though it should improve by even a mile or two every year. What’s up with that Chevy? But when you see the numbers for the Silverado Duramax with Four-Wheel-drive the numbers drop from last year. 

2021 Silverado highway mileage drops by three miles-per-gallon

2021 Chevrolet Silverado HD Carhartt Special Edition rear view

City miles-per-gallon drop by one mpg. Highway mileage drops by three, so the combined miles-per-gallon drop from 25 in 2020 to 24 in 2021. Not a huge amount, but when you factor that Chevy should have been able to slightly improve the mileage, it is not good.

The folks at GM Authority queried Chevy and got this response, “The 4WD 3.0-liter configuration went up in its test weight class, which led to slightly reduced fuel economy to 22 city/26 highway/24 combined. The 2WD configuration remains best-in-class with 23 city/33 highway.” 

Chevy later came back and said that the Silverado that was tested was a “higher-contented truck being tested based on the production schedule.” That means this particular truck had extra features that added weight. Carrying extra weight lowers mileage. Get it?

The weird thing about Chevy’s reason is that manufacturers self-test

2021 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD Carhartt Special Edition

RELATED: Chevy Silverado Sales Are Hurt By One Unfortunate Factor

The weird thing about that reason is that the manufacturers self-test. The EPA doesn’t do regular testing. It will do a surprise visit to yank a vehicle off of the line to see if the numbers it gets matches the manufacturers. So manufacturers normally test what it thinks will be the most fuel-efficient model. Then, it blankets the entire line with those numbers. And finally, it makes sure to inform you that these are just “estimates.” Real-world driving could net a different result.

If one were to test a lifted Silverado with 38-inch tall tires the mileage would be worse. It comes down to physics. But the problem for manufacturers that choose the path of fewer options for testing is that there can be lawsuits. If the customer’s mileage is way lower than the EPA estimates it can result in court time.

Manufacturers have started to test different optioned vehicles to arrive at more realistic estimates

2021 Chevrolet Silverado Realtree edition bed

Manufacturers want to avoid lawsuits, so many have started to test different optioned vehicles to arrive at more realistic estimates.  The initial testing was based on Duramax diesel Silverado pickups with lower-trim options. But consumers instead chose more highly optioned Duramax Silverados. To remain EPA compliant Chevy revisited the higher-trimmed Duramax Silverado and released those numbers, which are lower than in 2020. 

But don’t forget that the EPA estimates are just estimates. Mileage can vary wildly based on driving habits, terrain, whether you haul materials or pull a trailer, and options. 

Sours: https://www.motorbiscuit.com
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Overview

Huge heavy-duty trucks like the 2022 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD aren't for the faint of heart, but they’re incredible tools for hard-working folks who need them. While Chevy's mightiest pickups aren't quite as strong or powerful as the strongest Ford Super Duty or Ram HD, the heavy-duty Silverados–and their GMC counterparts–offer an outstanding Duramax diesel powertrain that makes 910 pound-feet of torque and a max tow rating of 36,000 pounds. Regardless of trailer weight, the Silverado HD can be outfitted with advanced assists and myriad cameras to make the job easier. After these world-class workhorses leave the jobsite, the ritziest versions are ready for high society, but Ford and Ram rivals have much richer cabins and better tech features. Still, the 2022 Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD are tools first and foremost, with tremendous capabilities and unabashedly bold styling.

What's New for 2022?

For 2022, Chevy makes the smallest of changes to the Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD. The alterations include a new Greenstone metallic paint color, the ability to equip the Custom trim with a power-adjustable seat, and the expanded availability of Chevy's six-function Multi-Flex tailgate. The latter is now optional on every Silverado HD model.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

We'd choose the 2500HD with the crew cab and the standard cargo bed. We'd also add all-wheel drive and the refined Duramax diesel powertrain to the LT trim level. We'd recommend the Z71 Off-Road package (18-inch wheels, all-terrain tires, spray-in bedliner, upgraded suspension, underbody protection) for enhanced styling and improved capability. We'd also choose the Convenience package for its desirable features. These include a 10-way power driver's seat, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats, LED cargo-bed lighting, a heated steering wheel, remote start, and more. Finally, the Safety package makes this beast easier to live with thanks to blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and front and rear parking sensors.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD have a standard gas-powered 6.6-liter V-8 that makes 401 horsepower and 464 pound-feet of torque and mates to a six-speed automatic transmission. The optional Duramax diesel 6.6-liter V-8 carries over from the previous generation. It continues to make 445 horsepower and 910 pound-feet, but now it hooks up to an Allison 10-speed automatic. These engines pair with rear- or all-wheel drive, and each is compatible with the single- or dual-rear-wheel axle. We drove both powertrains through mountains while towing several tons and were impressed by their capabilities. The gas engine and six-speed automatic worked well together to control the truck's speed, which is especially important when towing on steep grades. Still, the Duramax powertrain is the one to get for those who regularly tow heavy loads. Its mighty power and the transmission's effortless responses provided an extra level of confidence and security when doing what these trucks were made for—moving mountains. However, the heavy-duty Silverado's lack of steering accuracy and feedback—even when equipped with the electric-assist system—was less reassuring. That said, the big Chevy rides surprisingly well for its impressive capabilities.

Towing and Payload Capacity

Heavy-duty trucks are judged by their maximum towing and payload ratings, even if those massive loads are never actually tested by most people. The gas-powered Silverado HD can tow up to 17,400 pounds, and the diesel version can pull up to 36,000 pounds. Likewise, the strongest Silverado 3500HD with the regular cab and dual-rear-wheel axle can carry up to 7442 pounds of payload.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Since the EPA doesn't test vehicles as heavy as the Silverado HD and its colossal competitors, we can only judge their real-world mpg on our 75-mph highway fuel-economy route. We tested the Silverado 2500HD with the gasoline 6.6-liter V-8, and it earned 14 mpg on the highway. For comparison, we tested an F-250 with the gas-fed 6.2-liter V-8 and six-speed automatic transmission, and it returned 15 mpg in the same test. The diesel Silverado 2500HD managed 19 mpg on the highway, as did the Ram 2500 we last tested.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

Pickup trucks have a wide spectrum of interior configurations and available technology. The heavy-duty Silverado runs the gamut from stripped-down work truck to dressed-up crew cab. All feature a mountainous dashboard packed with easy-to-use switchgear. The Chevy's crew-cab, short-box setup has a longer wheelbase than the previous generation and provides increased passenger space. While even the fanciest models can't match the material quality and sophistication of the Ram HD, the Silverado's cabin and features still manage to transcend typical truck luxuries. The most desirable content includes heated and ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, a heated steering wheel, a head-up display, and more. The Chevy is packed with copious interior cubby storage that's highlighted by a giant center-console bin. Some models can also be equipped with a storage compartment under the back seat and bins built into the backs of the rear-seat cushions.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Every Silverado HD comes with a touchscreen that supports Chevy's Infotainment 3 software, which includes standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It features a useful volume and tuning knob as well as some physical buttons and voice commands that supplement the touch-sensitive display. A larger 8.0-inch touchscreen with a seven-speaker Bose audio system, additional power points, SiriusXM satellite radio, a Wi-Fi hotspot, and wireless charging is available, too. Its infotainment system also allows users to store different trailer profiles to monitor maintenance and even control trailer functions via a smartphone app.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

Every Silverado HD is available with a host of driver-assistance technology, and there are several trailer-specific assists that make towing easier. There's even a useful multiview camera system that includes a transparent mode that makes maneuvering in parking lots and merging onto the highway easier when towing by allowing the driver to virtually see through the trailer. For more information about the Silverado HD's crash-test results, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) websites. Key safety features include:

  • Available forward-collision warning and automated emergency braking
  • Available blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert
  • Available lane-departure warning

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Chevy covers the Silverado 2500HD and 3500HD with a competitive warranty that matches competitors from Ford and Ram. Every heavy-duty Silverado also gets one complimentary scheduled maintenance visit.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • Complimentary maintenance is covered for the first visit

Specifications

Specifications

2020 Chevrolet Silverado 2500/3500

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, rear- or rear/all-wheel-drive, 2–6-passenger, 2- or 4-door pickup

BASE PRICES
$35,695–$64,095

ENGINES
pushrod 16-valve 6.6-liter V-8, 401 hp, 464 lb-ft; turbocharged and intercooled pushrod 32-valve 6.6-liter diesel V-8, 445 hp, 910 lb-ft

TRANSMISSIONS
10-speed automatic with manual shifting mode, 6-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 141.5–172.0 in
Length: 235.5–266.0 in
Width: 81.9–96.7 in
Height: 79.8 in
Passenger volume: 69–139 cu ft
Curb weight: 6100–8050 lb

PERFORMANCE (C/D EST)
Zero to 60 mph: 6.1–6.6 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.7–15.1 sec
Top speed: 95–98 mph

ExpandCollapse

More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/chevrolet/silverado-2500hd-3500hd
2021 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD LTZ REVIEW

Review: The 2021 Chevrolet Suburban Duramax Diesel Is The Ultimate Full-Size American SUV

It's been nearly 20 years since you could walk into a Chevy dealership and drive home with a diesel engine under the hood of its flagship sport-utility vehicle. For 2021 the Chevrolet Suburban's turbodiesel option is back, and this time it's not restricted to heavy-duty three-quarter ton models, either: for an extra thousand bucks buyers can add the Duramax engine to any trim level from base all the way up to High Country.

Photo: Benjamin Hunting

The redesigned Suburban stands alongside its Tahoe and Yukon siblings as the only American-built SUVs currently offered with a diesel option. It's an inspired pairing, as these full-size haulers are often the first choice among drivers seeking a comfortable, do-everything tow rig, and the six-cylinder turbodiesel engine's seemingly endless plateau of torque is well-suited to the task.

More to the point, however, the new Suburban underscores the efficiency of an alternative fuel that's been all but vilified after a decade of scandal. Volkswagen's emissions cheating debacle might have ruined the diesel party for nearly every other automaker around the world, but by staying inside the boundaries of current EPA regulations this Chevrolet makes it hard to argue that massive people movers should be powered by anything other than ultra-smooth, fuel-sipping turbodiesels.

Torque For Days

The 3.0L Duramax inline-six offered by diesel versions of the 2021 Chevrolet Suburban is the same engine that can be found in the full-size Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups, where it debuted shortly before arriving in the SUV portfolio. Rated at 277 hp and 460 lb-ft of torque, with the latter coming on in full as low as 1,500 rpm, it finds itself wedged between the larger and thirstier 6.2L V8 (420 hp, 460 lb-ft) also available with the Suburban, and the more modest 5.3L base V8 (335 hp, 383 lb-ft).

Few Suburban shoppers are seeking straight line speed, but even down over a hundred horsepower versus the 5.3L, the Duramax-powered SUV is only a second or so slower off the line, reaching 60-mph in about 8 seconds. Credit goes to its incredible torque production, a smooth dollop of which effortlessly floats the truck's hefty 6,200 lbs of curb weight regardless of whether you're at highway speeds or simply idling from one stoplight to the next.

Photo: Benjamin Hunting

Although the Duramax's diesel origins are evident should you stand beside the Suburban at idle, from the inside there's only the occasional turbo wheeze to give it away even with the accelerator floored. Drama-free highway passing and uphill speed-holding are pleasant side effects of its 460 lb-ft of twist, and with a tow rating in the neighborhood of 8,000 lbs (and featuring an integrated exhaust brake), the diesel gives up very little to its mightier eight-cylinder siblings. It's the perfect partner for the Suburban's heft and mission statement, and there's a solid argument to be made that the Duramax deserves to be the standard drivetrain for the hefty SUV.

Even better? You'll be making far fewer visits to the fuel pump. On a 300 mile up-and-down road trip through the Laurentian mountains just north of Montreal, I logged an incredible 26 miles per gallon from the Chevrolet, which was loaded down with provisions for a cabin weekend in the wilderness. Even more incredible was the fact that city driving during the previous week knocked only a couple of mpg's off of the truck's overall performance, making the Duramax roughly 35 percent more frugal compared the vehicle's gas-powered options. Credit must go, too, to the 10-speed automatic gearbox that operated near-transparently during my time with the Suburban.

Aircraft Carrier Vibes

It's important to keep in mind that even with its new turbodiesel engine the redesigned 2021 Chevrolet Suburban isn't intended for everyone. Its long-wheelbase design and hulking proportions make it a genuine hassle to pilot in an urban setting, especially when it comes time to find a berth large enough to park it.

Photo: Benjamin Hunting

Although never twitchy or unstable (thanks to its upgrade to an independent rear suspension setup, and my tester's magnetically-controlled shocks), 'unwieldy' is the word that best describes operating the Suburban inside city limits. The SUV is far better enjoyed on the wide-open highway with the cruise control set and no need to worry about what might be hiding in front of the massive blind spot hovering just ahead of its towering grille. While it offers low-range four-wheel drive, the vehicle's brazen bulkiness dampens any trail aspirations one might have for Chevy's minibus.

Of course, the Suburban's gargantuan nature also affords it a level of interior room that's difficult to match outside of the minivan segment. There's very nearly 145 cubic feet of total storage space under its roof with the second and third row accommodations folded flat, and unlike the previous generation truck there's no ugly load floor hump to lift your gear over when packing it to the brim. Even with a passenger in each of its seven seats (my Premier trim model featured second-row buckets), there's a whopping 41.5 cubes stacked behind the final row.

It's rare to sit in the way-back of any current SUV and not curse your luck at rock-paper-scissors, but the Suburban (and its Yukon XL twin) is an exception. Leg room remains comfortable and there's little claustrophobia thanks to the truck's tall roof and ample side glass.

Second-from-the-top Premier trim trucks are also respectably equipped when it comes to cabin accoutrements, with surround sound audio, heated and cooled leather seats, a long list of active safety features, and even a power-folding option for the last row that frees you from the strain of reaching and tugging from the tailgate.

Best Of The Breed

The 2021 Chevrolet Suburban is a modern moving city, a thoroughly-updated take on the hulking sport-utility template that the original version of this truck helped to define in the '80s and '90s. While most of the market may have moved on from its body-on-frame majesty, when it comes to tasks like towing it's hard to better the Suburban's pickup-based roots in terms of both stability and capability, and its acres of interior room keep it at the head of the pack in appealing to those for whom practicality is of prime importance.

Photo:Benjamin Hunting

Add the available Duramax diesel as the motivating force behind all of the above, and you've got a near-perfect interpretation of the Suburban formula. Quite honestly it's difficult to justify ordering the Suburban with any other engine under the hood, especially considering the turbodiesel's extremely low cost and the fuel savings that come with it. The 3.0L's torque delivery is a perfect match for the 'Burb's big-boned character, and thanks to its suspension redesign and interior upgrades it's clear that the latest version of this iconic SUV is the best we've seen since the last diesel was on sale so many years ago.

Sours: https://www.drivingline.com/articles/review-the-2021-chevrolet-suburban-duramax-diesel-is-the-ultimate-full-size-american-suv/

Review 2021 duramax

The 2021 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 is a good truck; however, it has to compete with the extremely capable and well-put-together Ram 1500 and the very good Ford F-150. True it’s very capable but has often been let down by a cheap-feeling interior, something that really should be easy to fix.

What’s more important in a truck is what lies under the hood and I was never a fan of the 5.3-liter V8 used across various models, it simply doesn’t have the torque and it feels underpowered, especially in a Suburban.

The 2021 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Z71 tester I received has what I would consider to be the only option you should ever choose, the excellent 3.0-liter Duramax turbodiesel inline-six with 4WD. This engine is available across several Chevy and GMC vehicles and has 277 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque, mated to a smooth-shifting 10-speed transmission.

Don’t think of it as an old-school London taxi engine either, this one is a high-tech engine, with an aluminum block and cylinder head, twin overhead camshafts, and four valves per cylinder. It uses a variable-geometry turbo which can adjust the boost pressure based on load, as well as an electronically controlled variable-flow intake manifold. These all help to maximize and maintain peak torque much lower in the rev range.

This engine matches the torque numbers for the 6.2-liter V8 but provides it at much lower RPMs meaning you save big time on fuel costs. EPA numbers are 22/26/24 mpg for City/Hwy/Combined and during the week I had it I averaged 21.9 mpg versus 13.2 mpg in a Trail Boss with the 6.2-liter V8. It also has a greener footprint pumping out way less CO2.

For bragging rights you’ll want to know that the 3.0L Duramax has the same torque output (460 lb-ft) as the 6.2-liter V8

On Pavement

The Silverado handles as well as most other trucks, it feels like a truck, and thanks to its Diesel engine it sounds like one too. Chevy has used some noise-canceling to make it sound less rattly than diesel engines of old which never bothered me, but it makes sense if you are considering this engine in a brand-new Yukon Denali.

The brakes feel solid and the steering offers a decent amount of weight and feedback, it’s only let down is its ride quality when driven over sharp undulations in the pavement. It can also get somewhat fidgety when things smooth out and some float kicks in when pressed on anything but a flat surface. A Ram-type air suspension would be a big help here.

In normal driving everyday driving though the Silverado is well well-mannered and easy to maneuver and can move at a quick pace if needed. It’s not super quick from a standstill but the 0-60 time of 7.1 seconds is quick enough for most and it feels quicker driving it than the numbers suggest. The transmission contributes to much of this it’s perfectly mated to the engine and provides buttery smooth shifts.

Off-Road

With the Z71 package which includes Skid Plates, Twin Tube Shocks, Hill Descent Control, A 2 Speed Transfer Case, Heavy Duty Air Filter, and All Terrain Tires the Silverado is very competent off-road. Its 10.9 in ground clearance and 4 High and 4 Low ratios allow it to tackle most obstacles you throw at it.

We headed out to the Laguna Mountains to a truck trail named Thing Valley Road, which winds its way south to a locked gate put in by the Border Patrol to prevent migrants circumventing the checkpoints. It’s narrow and has some big ruts, some humps that test the ground clearance, and a lot of dirt.

For the second test, we headed to more difficult terrain on Sheep Mountain Road where things get twistier and steeper. The suspension provided great body control over big dips and ruts, and not once did we ground or bottom out the suspension. Traction was never going to be a problem and we powered up very easily in 4-wheel high.

On the descent, we used four-wheel-drive low since we wanted to test the Hill Descent Control, and it works great controlling the vehicle’s speed and forward motion while the driver can concentrate on seeing the terrain in front.

Inside

There wasn’t much of a luxury feel inside my LT tester, it’s functional but not particularly special, the quality of the plastics is inferior to the Ram, which I hate to keep saying. Some areas are good but then some hard-scratchy plastic appears on the door trim and it really shouldn’t. If you have to use hard plastic keep them below knee level.

Ok so rant over the rest of the interior is good, the infotainment system was the 8-inch version that comes with the All-Star Edition Plus package (see details below) and is fast and easy to use. The seats are very comfortable, and my tester had the leather seat option for $985 and on the LT model, the drivers are powered. The rear seat space is limo-like and the rear split bench pulls up and reveals plenty of storage space underneath.

Storage space overall is generous with a compartment above the glovebox, center console storage (my tester had the middle seat option) big door pockets with cup holders, and additional storage.

All-Star Edition Plus

My tester had the optional All-Star Edition Plus package ($1,900) which has a Rear Sliding Power Window, Cargo Bed Power Outlets, Wireless Apple Carplay, and Android Auto, HD Rear Vision Camera, Voice Recognition, Universal Home Remote, 2 USB Ports, 1 SD Card Reader, HD Radio and 20-inch Painted Alloy Wheels.

Final Thoughts

Without the option of the turbo-diesel, I probably wouldn’t consider a Silverado but now my mind has been changed, this motor is absolutely brilliant. Chevy has nailed the engine and transmission part now they just need to address the ride quality and the interior. Bear in mind that opting for the turbo-diesel does cost an additional $2,390 but it is money well spent.

VIDEO REVIEW

2021 Chevrolet Silverado Z71 Duramax Numbers

BASE PRICE: $45,700
PRICE AS TESTED: $55,565
VEHICLE LAYOUT: Front-engine, 2/4 wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door pickup
ENGINE: 3.0L DOHC I-6 Turbo-Diesel

POWER: 277 hp @ 3,750 rpm
TORQUE:
460 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm
TRANSMISSION: 10-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT: 5,150 lb
0-60 MPH: 7.1 sec
TOWING RATING: 9,300 lbs
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON: 22/26/24 mpg

OUR OBSERVED: 21.9 mpg
PROS: Excellent on and off-road manners, good looking, great engine
CONS: Somewhat plain interior


Sours: https://www.business2community.com/automotive/2021-chevrolet-silverado-1500-z71-duramax-review-the-diesel-is-the-only-engine-you-should-get-02429584
2021 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD LTZ REVIEW

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