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Fans Relive Final Fantasy XI's Punishing Past On Private Servers

Back in the early 2000s, Final Fantasy XI was famous for completely disrespecting players’ time. Masochistic and convoluted, the MMO drew in thousands of dedicated players who traded hours upon hours of grinding for the sweet feeling of accomplishment. 15 years later, more player-friendly MMOs monopolize the genre. And yet, there are still hundreds of fans foregoing cleaner gaming experiences for FFXI’s endlessly time-consuming and punishing challenges on legacy servers.

In the early years following the release of Square Enix’s inaugural MMO in 2002, it might have taken two hours to cull the game’s player index for a well-rounded team, inquire after everyone’s availability, and wait at a designated spot for your comrades to arrive. Obtaining choice armor could mean tip-toeing through four levels of a dungeon, with no map, before waiting three hours for the right monster to spawn. Then, probably, either another person would kill it out from under you or the monster wouldn’t drop the armor. Getting to a hub city sometimes meant waiting for a virtual ferry to show up—in real time.

Over time, FFXI made some adjustments. The pace changed. What took days to accomplish in 2005 now takes an hour, max. But some players apparently long for the days of waiting and failure and, then, more waiting. One, called Nasomi, now runs a legacy server that crystallizes FFXI in 2005, with but a few small compromises. Bored by FFXI’s smoother leveling system and its successor Final Fantasy XIV’s relative ease-of-play, Nasomi looked around for MMOs that brought him the same painful ecstasy that FFXI did. For him, none sufficed.

In 2013, he launched the Nasomi FFXI Community Server, a free, time-frozen and legally-gray iteration of FFXI that at any time might host a few hundred die-hard players. It’s made possible by the sinister-sounding Dark Star FFXI server emulator, which has 20 active contributors, according to its lead developer.

When I asked why Nasomi craved the brutality of FFXI, he cited one particular dungeon crawl. It was impossible to accomplish alone and FFXI didn’t have a great party-matching system in the early 2000s, so after hearing somebody loudly soliciting damage-dealers for that same dungeon-crawl in a city, he offered his services. The three-floor crawl lasted hours.

“There was no map at all,” he said. “The monsters on the upper levels were unfightable. If you tried, you died. It was dangerous, difficult and everyone had to work together or we had no chance.” Death-gripping his PlayStation 2 controller, Nasomi eventually accomplished the quest. The party had bonded over the challenges they faced. Nasomi received his first invitation to a Linkshell group that day, and for the next several years, he’d help his fellow players out with similarly daunting tasks.

“When you remove the need for players to need other players to accomplish things, players stop talking to each other,” Nasomi said.

In 2005, FFXI players (myself included) would toss off casual insults toward WoW players whose game, many thought, was a total cakewalk until its endgame. After a 2012 expansion, legacy server fans told me, FFXI began moving in that direction. And FFXIV’s developers have admitted to taking cues from WoW so their game would attract more casual players.

Slowly, large-scale, mainstream MMOs that required socialization and coordination gave way to ones that offered a more drop-in, drop-out experience. No more punishingly long runs across dangerous zones with the introduction of easy-access teleporters. No more eight-hour EXP binges with five friendly randos who’d later become your best online friends.

Other FFXI legacy server regulars agreed that FFXI’s difficulty is what gelled its communities. Jason McMorris, who plays on another legacy server, said that the game “forced you into the community by requiring players to cooperate together.” Tabitha Cordell, who plays on yet another legacy server, explained that FFXI’s quests and leveling system were far more difficult or often impossible to solo, unlike other MMOs along the lines of WoW and FFXIV. “The people that still play it latch on to the group play and the old ‘grindy’ experience,” she said. Legacy servers like Nasomi’s offer that sort of community feel, but on a smaller scale.

Now that WoW publisher Blizzard is developing WoW Classic, a return to the game’s nostalgic early days, FFXI fans are wondering whether Square Enix will take a hint and make an official FFXI legacy server. Although Nasomi’s server and those of his peers don’t attract nearly as many fans as WoW’s legacy servers—only about 400 people were on Nasomi’s last Sunday—the people who frequent them have just as much love for the game they grew up on.

And yet, Tabatha said, whenever she describes the memory of her favorite game to friends, one thing remains constant: “I am frequently told by people, ‘I wish I had time for that.’”

Sours: https://kotaku.com/final-fantasy-xis-punishing-past-is-kept-alive-on-priva-1820807418

Final Fantasy XIV continues to be a major contender in the MMORPG genre even after its unfathomably rocky start, which was so catastrophic that the developers decided to annihilate much of the game’s world through a literal in-game catastrophe that cleared the way for them to construct something grand atop the original’s scorched remains. This destruction occurred seven years ago, three years after the game’s original release in 2013. That is a very long time. The incredibly dissimilar MMORPG, Final Fantasy XI, launched in 2002 before Blizzard’s World of Warcraft came about to reconfigure player expectations of the genre at large. That was nineteen years ago and, unlike its younger sibling,  Final Fantasy XI was never annihilated. It didn’t need to be, even with Blizzard’s new, imposing standard in place. Even today, the game boasts a passionate base of loyal subscribers large enough for Square Enix to justify keeping the game around. In fact, the company still develops new content for it on a fairly regular basis. But how is it that these two games can coexist? Why haven’t the Final Fantasy XI players moved on? Why do some people, like me, play both?

It would make a degree of sense to switch over completely to Final Fantasy XIV. It’s an extremely polished game with a design that fits well into virtually any adult schedule. It has a healthy community, an amazing story, an eclectic selection of content, and the momentum to continue to grow. Hell, it even pays homage to Final Fantasy XI, through references, crossover events, and entire areas meant to emulate the older MMO’s gameplay. It comes very close to being true that you can find anything you could ever think to want from an MMO offered somewhere within Final Fantasy XIV’s theme park of activities. It’s super thoughtful in its design and around every bend is something demonstrative of the time and consideration the developers invested in entertaining and accommodating the full spectrum of potential players.

Ironically, this isn’t necessarily what every player craves. On some level, it’s a matter of mood and atmosphere. Final Fantasy XI can be unforgiving and that fact on its own can convey the game’s appeal to anybody who already understands how Dark Souls and its ilk appeals to a certain type of player. But Final Fantasy XI being difficult isn’t a direct parallel with the rewarding challenges of a Soulsborne type game.

Final Fantasy XI and XIV

Friendships Forged in Fire

Final Fantasy XI’s magic isn’t conjured by a manufactured “git gud” sort of mindset, which is a mindset that can often manifest in toxic ways. The magic comes from the interesting effect difficulty casts over the game’s community. Namely, it brings people together in a very organic way. Commonly, the game itself is at the heart of first interactions between players, as it tends to forge friendships through shared, sometimes perilous, experiences. A memorable moment seems to be a good foundation to build a friendship.

Meanwhile, Final Fantasy XIV more or less brings people together through private messaging and players shouting invites in crowded zones like carnival barkers without a circus. This isn’t a bad thing by any means, and players wandering about on their own will find plenty of opportunities to make friends if they want to. There are various channels for chatting and plenty of mediums for finding groups in Final Fantasy XIV, which means you never have to spend a day alone if you don’t want to. I’ve seen genuine love among some of these groups, too. That sense of camaraderie can be powerful, regardless of which game provided the soil in which it grew.

Final Fantasy XI was just made differently, and I think a lot of players have a nostalgia for the days they spent grinding away in the game. Sunk cost fallacy? Maybe in some cases, but I think it’s more about the game’s overall structure. For starters, an overwhelming majority of the game’s encounters occur out in the wild, rather than within the unobservable confines of an instanced event. This means a few things. First, players compete over the same resources, of which there is only a limited amount at any given time. Back in the day, this was most apparent in the case of notorious monsters. These rare creatures were tougher than your average mob and often dropped something of value. Also, a substantial portion of them would only appear within certain windows of time, which would open a certain amount of hours after the creature’s previous death. Sometimes these windows would take a day or three to appear. Other times the window could open in as few as two hours. Whatever the case, people would stand around as friends or foes and wait, which is a lot of time to get to know one another. In the case of some of the game’s strongest monsters, other players would gather about to simply watch a fight play out. Every so often, there was the very real sense that you were watching something legendary play out and the fact that it all happened out in the shared world created this sense of community. It all felt so alive. It also meant that you’d see players over and over. Consequently, people could and often would build a reputation for themselves. If it was a bad reputation they built, they’d feel the effects of it from other players.

Leveling up also meant gathering in groups and sitting around at a “camp” killing monster after monster. You’d recruit a group of six, ideally party for a couple of hours, and switch people in when someone had to leave. “Level 60 experience party. Do you need it?” was something a party leader would probably tire of typing by the end of a night, but the fact that they needed someone and hoped someone would need them too is sort of magical. Final Fantasy XIV has a matchmaking system where players can see one another as disposable, because reputation doesn’t matter so much when players from different servers are being paired together by a computer just because they happened to need the same thing at the same time. And the fact that players are whisked away after an instance to their respective servers after about 30 minutes of interaction makes it hard to nurture a friendship. They’re single serving acquaintances, and it isn’t uncommon for them to be absolutely silent the entire time you’re playing with them. That said, Final Fantasy XIV has made it possible to befriend people across servers and that has alleviated these concerns a bit.

Final Fantasy XI Final Fantasy XIV

Different Routes to Feelings of Heroism and Validation

World of Warcraft’s staggering influence is easy to detect in Final Fantasy XIV, and this is mostly a good thing. There is so much accessibility built right in and the “theme park” design means there is always something to do. It doesn’t much matter what you do, either, so long as you are enjoying it. In Final Fantasy XIV, it’s very easy to find a sense of purpose in crafting or gathering materials for your friends, who can then go on to use those items in raids. It’s difficult to find some part of it that isn’t connected to the rest of the game through story or economy, and that interconnected nature is an impressive accomplishment. This is one of the ways Final Fantasy XIV evokes the idea of a living, breathing world. Player-driven economy is at the heart of this game and is one of the chambers giving the game its pulse.

While the ability for players to carve out names for themselves and gain some sort of status on their server does exist in Final Fantasy XIV, it isn’t as common. There is very much a feeling that everybody is a hero in the game’s story but not so much to one another. There are no wandering strangers around to rescue you if you find yourself in the jaws of a random creature somewhere in Eorzea’s gorgeous and sprawling landscape. Besides, trouble doesn’t mean much anyway, because the stakes are so consistently low. Travel is easy and there’s no real penalty for dying, which is not a claim that Final Fantasy XI could have made during its more popular days. But feeling like a hero in the game’s story does have value and the writing is on par with some of the best games and television shows out there. Its narrative and lore is virtually everywhere you look. With rare exception, I can’t say I was ever as attached to the characters in Final Fantasy XI as I was in Final Fantasy XIV. The rare exception, in case you’re wondering, is Shantotto. Obviously.

Final Fantasy XI Final Fantasy XIV

The differences between the games make sense, of course. It’s hard to imagine a game like Final Fantasy XI releasing to any sort of acclaim today, so it’s probably fair to say that its enduring community and a sense of nostalgia from the players who gave it a chance early on are a contributing factor to its sustained success. It came out in a time where dial-up internet was still common and the battle system reflects that, as it isn’t meant to require rapid input from the players. There is a lot of planning to it, but that was different from any sort of planning that groups might do in Final Fantasy XIV. There’s an element of repetition in the newer game’s toughest encounters, and victory is contingent on memorizing patterns and executing on them with varying degrees of precision.

Final Fantasy XI had chaos built into the fights to offset the redundancy that could arise from its more limited movesets. To avoid redundancy, players were also encouraged to acquire a wide range of gear suited for different abilities and situations which they could swap out in the middle of battle. The unknowns meant players had to react to changing battles, and party composition felt like an extremely important thing to pay attention to. If a big important fight was in a heavily trafficked area, then some of the encounter’s chaos might come from menacing players and their sinister arsenals of underhanded tricks that could help them steal a hard claimed mob. It was frustrating when this happened, but there was an understanding between players that this was all part of the social contract. It certainly heightened the drama, too.

Because so much happened out in the game, players had to trek long distances between locations. This was as perilous as the target monster from time to time, as a long journey could mean sneaking by dangerous monsters, and each monster each person creeps past is an opportunity for swift disaster to strike. The more people you bring into a maze, cave, or temple, the larger the middle finger you hold out to fickle fate. And if you somehow missed the landmarks that mark the way, you might end up in a situation where you’re lost and running for your life which is exciting in its own right.

Final Fantasy XI Final Fantasy XIV

Final Fantasy XI Exists in Final Fantasy XIV‘s Enormous, High Resolution Shadow

Final Fantasy XIV is gorgeous and its scenery is something spectacular to behold. But outside of some achievements, it doesn’t do much to encourage players to see most of it. Once the story is done, players teleport about, queue up for instanced content, and soar past or far above the terrain with flying mounts. The monsters that roam the landscape are of little consequence. A lot of time in it might be spent in a single town waiting to be matched with people. Each expansion typically has a new town in it where players will congregate. At the very least, this does mean you’ll see familiar faces and those faces often crop up around certain times of day because of the game’s ability to accommodate a busy schedule. Saying hi is a good way to make this time pass in a more meaningful fashion. You can also listen to player-controlled bards play songs, note by note, or just revel in the cacophony of shouted memes and pop culture references.

Largely, Final Fantasy XI has changed, though. It has, by necessity, grown with the times and this takes shape in several different ways. The most palpable way is that most of the community I have been championing is gone, having moved onto other things like raising families or, say, playing Final Fantasy XIV. The players who remain are, largely, at the maximum level. When participating in endgame content, it is tricky to find help in earlier levels. Back in 2007, that wasn’t the case – leveling took ages and ages, for better or worse. The compromise Square Enix had to make in order to keep the game going was to introduce a system of recruitable NPC allies called trusts so players could play old content by themselves. It’s fun to collect them and I appreciate the ability to travel all around with them in tow. They’re also not as likely to cause any trouble as a real player might be due to the fact that enemies take a fairly cavalier attitude to their presence. I still prefer actual human players acting in the role of adventuring fellows, though.

Final Fantasy XIV, on the other hand, was built to accommodate a single player approach, only occasionally forcing players to team up. In the last expansion pack, Square Enix introduced a trust system and, as with Final Fantasy XI, it is nice to fight alongside familiar, lovable NPCs. It also makes a lot of sense for XIV. The game’s producer, Naoki Yoshida, stated that there are players who want to take things at their own pace and immerse themselves in the story without other players. I sympathize with those players, too. I can see how some people might not want a monstrous looking player character dressed in a Halloween costume appearing in the cutscene before a dramatic story encounter. Yoshida has also said that there are players who use the game like a chatroom. The developers have built a brilliant place for all types of people.

I reckon that the announcement of Final Fantasy XIV’s impending release sounded like Final Fantasy XI’s death knell in the ears of its players. That was certainly how I felt. This resulted in my interest in the game diminishing as I wasn’t sure I wanted to invest any further in a game that would be ending soon. Others wanted to see things through and clear the content they’ve been trying to clear for ages. Some just stuck by their friends. I reckon few of us had any idea that the game had more than a decade of life left in it, even as we watched the first version of Final Fantasy XIV explode on the runway.

Final Fantasy XI and XIV

The New Era of Vana’diel Draws from Past, Present and Future

The game changed almost immediately, though. Before long, it felt like Square Enix had given the players the keys to the kingdom, and all of a sudden everybody was stronger and able to accomplish things that would have been Herculean tasks months prior. Seemingly with the flick of a switch players could ascend to max level in days rather than months. And the end game content got harder and more ridiculous to match. One early example of the shift towards the absurd was a questline that sees players fighting a dragon of the Supreme Beings family of monsters on the moon with nothing but their weapons, wits, and, perhaps, a potion that increases all of their stats by an unfathomable amount. And even with that potion, it was still very possible to lose the fight.

The developers handing over the keys wasn’t enough for a sizable portion of players. So far as I can tell, the use of third party tools is almost expected between players now that the game has outlived every platform its launched on save the PC.  These tools make the game friendlier in some ways and in other cases more fun. Square Enix can work around latency issues and allow players to play with higher degrees of precision. Other tools allow them to change the music, improve the graphics, unlock the framerate, alter the overlay, or automate monotonous tasks. Oh, and there are, as you’d expect, mods in use that give players the freedom to walk around naked. This mentality isn’t shared by the greater Final Fantasy XIV userbase, but in XI, the players I speak to are cool with mods in practically all instances, so long as they aren’t being used to cheat other players out of a quality experience. That aspect of community and adherence to a social contract is still there, even with a proclivity amongst the player base to routinely make use of what could technically be considers exploits. It’s not like most of them are using bots to claim NPCs the way in-game currency sellers were doing in the game’s prime, so it’s easy to forgive.

Final Fantasy XIV is, at the moment, moderately competitive in a way that Final Fantasy XI isn’t. Players want to perfect their abilities, raid groups want to have server first and world first clears. Being good can give you and edge up on the market boards. In this sort of climate, cheating is heavily frowned upon and with good reason. You will see some third party tools that parse battle information but, beyond that, they are a rare sight. Final Fantasy XIV doesn’t need to be patched up and polished. Final Fantasy XI benefits from it. Also, it isn’t clear if the developers are really keeping an eye on Final Fantasy XI players in this regard. People are having fun, the game’s alive, might as well let them be, I say.

Final Fantasy XI and XIV

Their Coexistence Has Been Perfect, but Time Takes Everything, Eventually

The game won’t always be alive, though. One day, the virtual world of Vana’diel will disappear in an official capacity, along with its story, characters, treasures, and notorious monsters. One can hope that Final Fantasy XI will be ported to a single player experience somehow, although news on that front has been lacking since the mobile version was announced in the first place. But I don’t think we have to worry about a world where the stories we tell of Final Fantasy XI in memoriam are the only way we experience it. The game does well enough on the Square Enix servers for the developers to continue to support it with regular content. But that doesn’t account for the entire player base. There are private servers running the game as it was when it had a maximum level of 75 and seem to host a sizable community of passionate fans.

I have no doubt that Final Fantasy XIV will one day be a fond memory for most of its players, and I cannot fully express how heartening it is to see the diverse array of people who play it. Accessibility is important, and it’s arguably one of the more profound and admirable goals that developers strive to achieve. It’s easy to sell someone on the game, and I consciously exercise restraint whenever I suspect I am about to get too carried away talking about the story of the Shadowbringers expansion. It’s a game that I can play with gaming veterans and newcomers alike and somehow enjoy myself alongside either group. Final Fantasy XIV checks so many boxes and the nigh boundless expanse of content offers a selection of flavors that can satiate an assortment of distinct appetites. One of the appetites it can’t abate, however, is an appetite for the inimitable morsel that is Final Fantasy XI, even if it does occasionally try to borrow from the game’s concepts on behalf of players who are fans of both. If such players are anything like me, though, they don’t want Final Fantasy XI in their Final Fantasy XIV. At the risk of sounding hungry with the continuing food metaphor, this isn’t a peanut butter and chocolate type scenario. I am more than happy to consume a full course of Final Fantasy XIV before having a little bit of Final Fantasy XI as a treat. The two can coexist the same way Paper Mario: The Origami King and Super Mario Odyssey can coexist.  In short, they can’t really be compared to one another, which is strange because you would expect there to be more overlap between two different Final Fantasy MMORPGs.

Final Fantasy XI is available for PCs. Final Fantasy XIV is available for the PlayStation 4 and PC.

Sours: https://www.siliconera.com/how-can-final-fantasy-xi-xiv-exist-in-harmony/
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Final Fantasy XI Fan Releases a Retro RPG Demake of Square Enix’s First MMO

Published onEd McGlone

Home » News » Final Fantasy XI Fan Releases a Retro RPG Demake of Square Enix’s First MMO

Final Fantasy XI has seen a bit of resurgence as of late. There’s no clear reason why. Maybe it’s a bit of Final Fantasy XIV magic trickling down onto Square Enix’s first foray into the MMORPG space. Or perhaps it’s just old-school MMO fans coming home and wanting a more classic experience.

In either event, there have been lots of exciting Final Fantasy XI developments as of late, and here’s another for fans to sink their teeth into. A fan by the name of mithrandir133 has created a retro-style RPG, set in the world of Final Fantasy XI.

Called Final Fantasy XI Braver, the game boasts 30 to 50 hours of SNES-style RPG gameplay. It’s not an MMORPG, and it follows its own story rather than the story of Finial Fantasy XI proper. It’s entirely single-player and you’ll run into familiar faces from the MMORPG.

Final Fantasy XI Braver is entirely free to play, and also has other elements familiar to fans of Final Fantasy XI such as skillchains, magic bursts, crafting, mining, and a class system reminiscent of that of the MMORPG.

If you wanted to give it a try, the download link is right here.

Projects like this really make you wonder about what Square Enix would do if they decided to shut Final Fantasy XI down. Would do anything similar to this project? Fortunately, we don’t have to worry about that for a while as Final Fantasy XI gears up to celebrate its 20th anniversary next year.

Sours: https://twinfinite.net/2021/07/final-fantasy-xi-fan-releases-a-retro-rpg-demake-of-square-enixs-first-mmo/
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Forum » FFXI » General » As a person who played FFXI classic and Wow

As a person who played FFXI classic and Wow

 Asura.Kalimairo

Server: Asura

Game: FFXI

user: kalimairo

Posts: 131

By Asura.Kalimairo 2019-08-13 17:06:48

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i agree for sure Azeroth and classic FFXI are the greatest mmo in existence

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i hope square adds classic ffxi :"(
 Odin.Creaucent

Server: Odin

Game: FFXI

user: Creaucent

Posts: 1147

By Odin.Creaucent 2019-08-13 17:27:45

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If we are going classic XI and its level 50 cap i very much doubt anyone would want that. We could go up to ToAU with its 3 day waits on most main events and on NMs as well. there is also the fact of 30-200 exp per mob and needing 10k exp per merit. Apart from EXP and Merit parties you were pretty limited on things that you could jump right into.

I do look back on the 75 era very fondly however i wouldnt have the time to do all that now especially 4-5 hours of dyna.
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 Asura.Elizabet

Server: Asura

Game: FFXI

user: Elizabet

Posts: 489

By Asura.Elizabet 2019-08-13 17:46:25

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As a person who played FFXI and classic wow, and current wow.

Games I play / plan to play:
* Current FFXI
* Classic Wow

Games I won't play:
* Current Wow
* Classic FFXI (even if official version)
 
By 2019-08-13 18:10:27

 Undelete | Edit  | Link | Quote | Reply

 
 Asura.Kalimairo

Server: Asura

Game: FFXI

user: kalimairo

Posts: 131

By Asura.Kalimairo 2019-08-13 19:04:41

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Asura.Elizabet said: »

As a person who played FFXI and classic wow, and current wow.

Games I play / plan to play:
* Current FFXI
* Classic Wow

Games I won't play:
* Current Wow
* Classic FFXI (even if official version)


easy you cant put time in an mmO that's why you say that :) Current game is trash its all about *** scripts how can you compare it to wow classic or FFXI classic ?
 Quetzalcoatl.Kyren

Server: Quetzalcoatl

Game: FFXI

user: rada

Posts: 104

By Quetzalcoatl.Kyren 2019-08-13 19:11:36

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Asura.Kalimairo said: »

i hope square adds classic ffxi :"(


You know you don't haveto do the +75 genkai..

Once you don't BOOMclassic FFXI!
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By Jetackuu 2019-08-13 19:19:25

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Asura.Kalimairo said: »

Asura.Elizabet said: »

As a person who played FFXI and classic wow, and current wow.

Games I play / plan to play:
* Current FFXI
* Classic Wow

Games I won't play:
* Current Wow
* Classic FFXI (even if official version)


easy you cant put time in an mmO that's why you say that :) Current game is trash its all about *** scripts how can you compare it to wow classic or FFXI classic ?

Odd I don't use scripts and play the game just fine. Maybe it's just you and your opinion that are trash.

edit: and wow has always been trash.
 Asura.Aeonova

Server: Asura

Game: FFXI

user: aeonova

Posts: 2226

By Asura.Aeonova 2019-08-13 19:28:21

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Bumping this classic thread because classic is better; per thread topic.
 Asura.Elizabet

Server: Asura

Game: FFXI

user: Elizabet

Posts: 489

By Asura.Elizabet 2019-08-13 19:31:22

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Asura.Kalimairo said: »


easy you cant put time in an mmO that's why you say that :) Current game is trash its all about *** scripts how can you compare it to wow classic or FFXI classic ?


I do have the time to put in, how did you assume I didnt? And I love classic wow, played its beta, will play it in 2 weeks. They're all different games. I simply think Classic Wow is a better video game than current Wow, and Current XI is a better video game than old XI.

It has nothing to do with free time amount, or time requirements, or time gating, or time travel for that matter. It has nothing to do with nostalgia or slapping a classic tag on it. Its simply my choice of which is the better video game.
 Asura.Ladyofhonor
By Asura.Ladyofhonor 2019-08-13 20:35:23

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Classic XI was the trash game. You barely had any gear choices, there was TP, WS, accuracy. Paladin's used *** earth staves as their ultimate weapon, oh and also shadows because defense was nearly useless. The mechanics of the game, the time required for tiny improvements, and huge lack of variety of gear like we have now make it all less than current XI.

Besides, most people who automate everything in current XI are bad at current XI.

 Fenrir.Richybear

Server: Fenrir

Game: FFXI

user: Richybear

Posts: 763

By Fenrir.Richybear 2019-08-13 21:50:02

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Real pros automate posts

<if>thread=imiss75days</if>
shitpost

end
 Bahamut.Negan

Server: Bahamut

Game: FFXI

user: Negan

Posts: 1182

By Bahamut.Negan 2019-08-13 23:28:53

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I just cant wait for Classic Burning Crusade!

By abknight 2019-08-14 00:29:01

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Asura.Ladyofhonor said: »

Classic XI was the trash game. You barely had any gear choices, there was TP, WS, accuracy. Paladin's used *** earth staves as their ultimate weapon, oh and also shadows because defense was nearly useless. The mechanics of the game, the time required for tiny improvements, and huge lack of variety of gear like we have now make it all less than current XI.

Besides, most people who automate everything in current XI are bad at current XI.


Earth staff tanking and shadows were not part of original XI. You're referring to things people did 2004 and later. Unless you played 2002-2003, before Zilart released in Japan, you didn't play the original game. Someone else mentioned not having time for original Dynamis nowadays, but Dynamis was also not part of the game until later and really wasn't feasible when it was released.

Original XI was awesome. It had a traditional fantasy feel and was very rewarding. No such thing as "ultimate weapons," because everyone was just an adventurer. The world felt incredibly mysterious and dangerous. The danger disappeared as gear was added, the mystery disappeared as information became readily available on wikis, and though I'm not a JP elitist, the player community and atmosphere was destroyed by the NA release.

TLDR 50 cap re-release with cap raises to 55 and 60 on the original schedule would be awesome, but almost no one who visits this site would like such a game.
[+]
 
By 2019-08-14 02:33:11

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 Asura.Beatsbytaru
By Asura.Beatsbytaru 2019-08-14 03:01:11

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abknight said: »

I'm not a JP elitist, the player community and atmosphere was destroyed by the NA release.

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By Shichishito 2019-08-14 03:38:21

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Asura.Kingnobody said: »

That's just your opinion.

Just admit that you pine the old days, and that your opinion sucks.


Jetackuu said: »

Odd I don't use scripts and play the game just fine. Maybe it's just you and your opinion that are trash.

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 Dazusu
By Dazusu 2019-08-14 05:41:35

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Old FFXI isn't for everyone (and lots of us, myself included, don't have time for what it was); but I find it amusing when people get offended and go on the attack if someone articulates their desire to play 2004-era FFXI again over what's currently on offer. It's like people today can't grasp or deal with the fact that not everyone is going to agree with them on what's the better game.

I'm now partial to the Abyssea era over pre-Abyssea (whereas 5 years ago, I would have said give me HNMs back). I have time for Abyssea, I don't have time for Fafnir to not spawn until the end of window.

Rips said: »

I said it before and I'll say it again. We dont miss old FFXI. We miss our youth and that era of time when FFXI and Vana'diel was bigger than us.


The producer/director of retail WoW had this mentality in 2013. It's nostalgia, rose-tinted glasses, no one has time for that etc. Then in 2017 the same guy announced Classic WoW to rapturous cheers and applause.
 
By 2019-08-14 05:58:31

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By 2019-08-14 05:59:41

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 Bahamut.Negan

Server: Bahamut

Game: FFXI

user: Negan

Posts: 1182

By Bahamut.Negan 2019-08-14 06:04:53

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Dazusu said: »

Then in 2017 the same guy announced Classic WoW to rapturous cheers and applause.


Can't WAIT to see what happens when all those ppl zerg to endgame and are left standing there in their shiny gear blaming Blizzard(JUST LIKE IT WAS THE FIRST TIME).
 Shiva.Phioness

Server: Shiva

Game: FFXI

user: Phioness

Posts: 268

By Shiva.Phioness 2019-08-14 08:09:06

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I used to love Hunting NM's, keeping a tally of all the zones I had killed every NM in. Getting your Dynamis drop, shouts of adventures seeking help to brave the depths of Garlaige Citadel in their quest for artifact Gear, and fun conversations with people in Jeuno.

Now I enjoy seeing all the cool strategies like the Monk one for this months ambuscade. Also we have comprehensive knowledge to help returning players create their 1st REMA and turn their favorite jobs into Deadly Weapons (DD's) Mythril Fortresses (Tanks), and Magic Infused Pillars of Solitude (Support). We now have varieties of ways to express our tactics using YouTube, Twitch, and the forums on this site.

The game has evolved throughout the years, and I have evolved with it. While nostalgia is great, being a creature destined for extinction due its inability to change is not.

Those who wish for the old have not been on this long journey (see their post #'s and lack of gameplay). They cannot appreciate 'what is', because they are stuck in 'what was'.
 Siren.Mosin

Server: Siren

Game: FFXI

user: BKiddo

By Siren.Mosin 2019-08-14 08:11:18

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good advice for life in general
 Asura.Ladyofhonor
By Asura.Ladyofhonor 2019-08-14 08:38:55

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abknight said: »

Asura.Ladyofhonor said: »

Classic XI was the trash game. You barely had any gear choices, there was TP, WS, accuracy. Paladin's used *** earth staves as their ultimate weapon, oh and also shadows because defense was nearly useless. The mechanics of the game, the time required for tiny improvements, and huge lack of variety of gear like we have now make it all less than current XI.

Besides, most people who automate everything in current XI are bad at current XI.


Earth staff tanking and shadows were not part of original XI. You're referring to things people did 2004 and later. Unless you played 2002-2003, before Zilart released in Japan, you didn't play the original game. Someone else mentioned not having time for original Dynamis nowadays, but Dynamis was also not part of the game until later and really wasn't feasible when it was released.

Original XI was awesome. It had a traditional fantasy feel and was very rewarding. No such thing as "ultimate weapons," because everyone was just an adventurer. The world felt incredibly mysterious and dangerous. The danger disappeared as gear was added, the mystery disappeared as information became readily available on wikis, and though I'm not a JP elitist, the player community and atmosphere was destroyed by the NA release.

TLDR 50 cap re-release with cap raises to 55 and 60 on the original schedule would be awesome, but almost no one who visits this site would like such a game.

So before gear swapping was even relevant because there wasn't even worthwhile gear in the game...no, pass, that's just brutal self-hatred right there.
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By Bahamut.Inspectorgadget 2019-08-14 10:44:27

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as someone who started playing when the level cap was 70, the 75 cap era was trash.

Basically if you wanted to become a standout player you had to have no life and raid 24/7/365 to be able to even have a chance at getting the best gear and/or Relics/Mythics (provided you were lucky enough to even be in an LS that was dedicated or good enough to camp and kill HNMs), or you had to make your own linkshell then run off to another server with the linkshell bank then pay mercs for all your stuff.

Glad none of that is necessary anymore.

The only thing I miss is the daily VNBoards/BG Forum drama, ***was lit.
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By 2019-08-14 11:15:47

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 volkom
By volkom 2019-08-14 11:31:04

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H4G is having a 10k sub AMA tonight.

 Bismarck.Snprphnx

Server: Bismarck

Game: FFXI

user: Snprphnx

Posts: 2581

By Bismarck.Snprphnx 2019-08-14 11:51:12

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SE doesn't need to re-release the game. Most, if not all of the pre-abyssea zones have Field Manuals or Grounds Tomes in them. Just add a feature to them that forces a level cap.Any gear you have would lose almost all of the iLvl stats. You could even have it so that its a buff that lasts a week and can't be removed, and disables use of the easy warps, so you have the teles/chocobos/airships/boats only.

People could go any buy up old gear, which would revitalize some of the lower level crafting, and the need for those supplies.
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Original Post- Hide
By 2019-08-13 17:06:48

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i agree for sure Azeroth and classic FFXI are the greatest mmo in existence

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i hope square adds classic ffxi :"(

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Log in to post.

Sours: https://www.ffxiah.com/forum/topic/53928/as-a-person-who-played-ffxi-classic-and-wow

Classic ffxi

Welcome to Eden Server!

We are excited to welcome you to Eden. Eden is a private FFXI emulation server forked from the Darkstar Project. 

We have a solid three man development team working directly on Eden with decades of combined experience in software development. We are all detail oriented and open to the community voicing their opinions. On top of this we have a system in place to update our code base from the Darkstar Project community contributors every so often as well.

The vision of Eden is to see a helpful community that promotes a team based environment. We feel that the 75 Treasures of Aht Urghan era was the perfect balance between great content and a game that made people work together. We have four tenants that we like to hold above all others, and although we aim to stay close to the proper era content, what is most important to us is...

  1. Content that promotes team work.
  2. Common sense balancing. We are okay with changing things that don't make any sense. As an example, we have chosen to leave Dragoon's two hour ability as Spirit Surge as it made absolutely no sense to have Call Wyvern be a 2 hour cooldown.
  3. Select quality of life improvements. While our aim is to stay as close to era as possible, there will be times where we stray from this. This comes back to common sense balancing.
  4. Classic NM camping. We've reverted all of your favorite old notorious monsters to drop their original items, no longer will they drop Rare/Exclusive items!

While we originally were developing for a start date of March 1st 2019 this date was moved up considerably due to that fact that the Kupo private server was being shut down. Eden took on the character data from Kupo's database so that those characters could live on.

Eden's beta phase will last until we feel that the server is stable and that there is enough content. This beta phase, however, will persist character data into the general release. Players that play during beta will not lose any significant data between playing in beta and playing in the general release. However, there may be some changes that we notice that will require slight rollbacks. Such as exploits or abused game mechanics. We would only roll back that single part for the characters that participated. Hopefully this is clear that you can progress your characters during beta and still continue with that progress during the general release.

To play, you'll need to install FFXI and use a program to connect it to private servers. An easy to use, custom installer package for this server is being created; but until that is finished, you can find that information at the link below.

Click here to setup your computer to play on Eden.

Sours: https://classicffxi.fandom.com/wiki/Welcome_to_Eden
FF11 Classic Vs FFXI Retail and What's Changed - Highlights

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