Facebook group bots

Facebook group bots DEFAULT

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could send a chat blast to your entire Facebook group?

Click. Whiz. Bam.

Well, you can. Sort of.

Admittedly it’s not click-whiz-bam, but it is possible with some hacky workarounds that we’ve cooked up using MobileMonkey.

In this article, you’ll learn and be able to execute exactly the simple hacks that will allow you to message your Facebook Group members with a free chatbot. 

To make a chatbot for a Facebook group, first sign up for MobileMonkey.

Every point in this article uses the chatbot builder, MobileMonkey. 

Before you begin, please sign up for MobileMonkey. 

You can create a free account for now, or (better yet) sign up for a Pro account. Some of the points below require a Pro account in order to successfully execute them. 

Using a Messenger Chatbot to Message a Facebook Group:  What You Need to Know

Directly messaging a Facebook group is not an actual feature either of MobileMonkey or Facebook Messenger. There’s no such thing as a Facebook Group Chatbot, unfortunately. 

We all wish this were the case.

It would be amazing if you could whip up a message, toss it into a chatbot dialogue, and send it off to a group.

We get variations on this question all the time:

  • How do I make a chatbot for a Facebook group?
  • How do I create a Facebook group chatbot? 
  • Can I connect a chatbot to a Facebook group?
  • Can you add a chatbot to Facebook chat group?

You can’t do it quite like that. There is no direct solution, only workarounds. 

Broadly, it works like this. You must first invite Facebook group members to connect on Messenger. Once they are Messenger contacts, then you can send them bulk messages, chat blasts, Messenger broadcasts, etc. 

Let me make a quick aside about chat blasts or broadcast messages. These messages must be non-promotional in nature. No offering coupons or inviting people to your Bargain Basement Blowout Sale. Before you can send chat blasts, Facebook must approve your Page for subscription messaging. 

Here’s what you’ll need to create a Messenger Chatbot for a Facebook group:

  1. A MobileMonkey account
  2. Your own Facebook group or business page
  3. Awareness of how to create Facebook ads (Just the basics are fine)
  4. A little bit of ad budget (even $5 a day is fine for starters)

So, what is the process for inviting your Facebook group members to connect on Messenger?

There are 3 really cool (and surprisingly easy) ways to do it.

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1. Chat blast your Facebook group by asking group members to become Messenger subscribers.

One of the most effective ways to introduce group members into your Messenger contact list is to ask these group members to become subscribers.

The way to do this tactically is as follows:

  1. Create a chat dialogue in MobileMonkey inviting group members to subscribe.
  2. Post the link to this in your Facebook group.

Let me walk you through that process. 

Go to Bot Builder then Dialogues in MobileMonkey.

chatbot builder group messaging

Create a simple dialogue that makes the request.

Here’s what it looks like in MobileMonkey.

MobileMonkey Subscribe to Messenger

There are two elements in that Dialogue — the Quick Question and the Multiple Choice answer.

Notice how I’m making a straightforward and personalized ask — “Hi Daniel, want to connect on Messenger?” 

I provide only one answer — the right one. YES. 

That’s it. Once they click the yes, they’re in. Boom. 

Test this dialogue yourself to see how it works. 

(Go ahead, please. Try out the link above. It will make much more sense if you do.)

Notice how once you tap or click YES in the dialogue, it automatically sends you another message: “Thank you for subscribing. Type [STOP] or [UNSUBSCRIBE] to unsubscribe at any time.”

This is important.

Just as you want to make it easy for people to subscribe, you also want to make it easy for them to unsubscribe. 

If subscribers don’t know how to turn off your chatbot — e.g., by typing STOP — then they might block you. And if too many people block you, then Facebook will impose messaging limits on your page. (This happened to us one time.) 

So, the basic concept is this:  ask for subscribers and you shall receive. Easy stuff.

Hot tips:

  • Don’t just drop the link and leave it. Say some nice things. Include an image and throw in some emojis for good measure. 
  • Instead of posting this link in the main page feed, pin the post. This way, you make sure that your group sees it (and hopefully clicks it.)
  • Offer something nice. As an exchange for group members opting in, offer them a free something — a mention, a link, a promo share, whatever. A little sugary sprinkle never hurt.

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2. Chat blast your Facebook group by adding a comment guard (autoresponder) to an organic Facebook post.

(I personally love this one.)

“Comment guard” is the MobileMonkey nomenclature for a Facebook post autoresponder.

What you do is add a chatbot to a Page Facebook post using the MobileMonkey comment guard. When people comment on that organic post, they automatically receive an autoresponse inviting them to become a Messenger contact.

Brilliant!

It’s the Rumpelstiltskin of Facebook — spinning precious contacts out of mere commenters!

To be clear about it, you cannot use Comment Guards in group posts. But you can use a Comment Guard on your Facebook Page, which will target many of the same people who are in your group. Thus, you are effectively targeting group members to become Messenger subscribers. 

To create it, go to Lead Magnets and FB Comment Guard in MobileMonkey.

Facebook Post Autoresponder for Messaging Facebook Groups

The process of setting up a comment guard is self-explanatory and simple.

The real sizzle of this process comes when you elicit more and more people to comment on your organic post. After all, the more people who comment on a post, the more contacts you’ll stack up in Messenger.

Here are some ways to do just that.

Hot tips:

  • Make it a quiz. Ask people a question, and then have them comment their answer. Promise them the correct answer after they comment. You can send it to them automatically in the chatbot dialogue. Brilliant!
  • Comment with a gif. Gif comments are all the rage. Ask people any rando question, and have them answer with gifs.
  • Boost the post. With a few dollars expenditure, you can add even more Messenger contacts this way. 
  • Answer with predictive text. Tell people to complete the sentence with predictive text. “When I got to work, I saw….” “My boss is such a….” “I really, really hate…” “It tickles when…” This kind of thing is addictive. (I bet you’re probably wanting to type those sentences on your phone right now just to see what’s going to come out!)

3. Chat blast your Facebook group by creating a Click-to-Messenger Facebook Ad that invites Page fans to become contacts on Messenger.

With this method, you’ll create a click-to-messenger ad that targets fans of your page. These people have the closest proximity to group members, giving you the best chance of getting them to become Messenger contacts.

The goal here is to get your group members to message your Page, thereby growing your subscriber list.

(Facebook does not provide targeting options for groups. Targeting only works for Pages. Page-level targeting is as best as you’ll get.)

Here we go.

Go to Ads Manager and click Create to make an ad.

Create a new Campaign, and choose the “Messages” objective.

Facebook Messenger Ad Targeting Page Fans

In the targeting portion of your ad creation, select Connections and then People who like your Page.

Messenger Ad Targeting

That’s the secret sauce, right there.

Finish up with your ad placements, budget & schedule.

Now, go to your MobileMonkey app.

This is where Facebook mojo meets the magic of MobileMonkey. (Did you like that alliteration? I worked hard at that.)

Click Advertising and then Messenger Ads.

Messenger Ads to Message Facebook Group Members

Please note: Creating Messenger Ads in MobileMonkey is a pro feature, so it’s available only with a paid account.

Don’t sweat it! Paid accounts are really, really inexpensive right now. The Pro Plan includes everything that MobileMonkey has to offer plus 5,000 contacts, MobileMonkey branding removed, and tons more.

MobileMonkey will walk you through the process of creating the content to send your subscribers in the click-to-Messenger ad.

Hot tips:

  • Add an image that contains your Page branding — colors, logo, style, etc.. Due to the psychological power of the mere-exposure effect users will recognize your branding and instinctively trust the ad.
  • Use a simple and straightforward message, “Hey, wanna connect on Messenger?” Tell them what’s up with the ad and what they’re doing when they click the button.

Once users respond to your ad, they become part of your Messenger contact list.

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Sending Messenger Blasts to Facebook Groups: Final Tips

To send a chat blast to your Facebook group, the concept is simple. Invite your group members to become Messenger subscribers. When they are subscribers, you can send them messages.

It’s the same principle at work for sending Messenger blasts to a page’s fans.

Messaging Facebook group members is 100% possible, but not in a direct way.

Today’s marketers need to be laser-focused on building Messenger contact lists. The marketing era of conversational chatbots and chatbot marketing is upon us. And the new list building is in Messenger contacts.

There are three things in closing that you should know and do:

  1. Sign up for MobileMonkey if you haven’t yet.
  2. Join the MobileMonkey Facebook group to get and give help on chatbot marketing. We have over 20,000 members and counting.
  3. Do yourself and your marketing agency a favor by signing up for the free Marketing Agency Growth Accelerator Summit. The leaders in the marketing field will be instructing attendees on the fastest way to land huge clients and fat retainer fees for your agency.
Sours: https://mobilemonkey.com/blog/how-to-use-messenger-chatbot-for-facebook-group

Facebook Messenger bots work in groups now — just don’t expect them to chat

Yesterday at its annual F8 developer conference, Facebook launched Messenger Platform 2.0, and discovery was the main theme, with the addition of new features like chat extensions and bot recommendations by Facebook’s intelligent assistant M. With chat extensions, bots finally gained the ability to interact with people in a group setting.

Bots can now be shared in a single chat thread or broadcast to groups of people, but Messenger bots in groups cannot talk to you, crack jokes, or be conversational in any way you might think bots can.

With platform 2.0, bots don’t chat. They appear in webview as chat extensions. A graphic interface is extremely flexible and can look better than plain text, but the tradeoff is no natural language processing in the bot. That means anytime a bot is in chat with two or more people, it cannot listen to your words or speak to you, characteristics heavily associated with bots.

“Chat extensions do not listen to your messages,” Larionov told a room of a few hundred developers in a session Tuesday. “You cannot @ mention them. Instead, we are going all-in with webviews. Why? Because we want to reach user input and text is very limiting. We also don’t want bots to have access to your private conversations, and we don’t want to pollute your conversations with bot commands.”

Losing the ‘chat’ in chatbots

Whether you see it as a good or bad thing, the removal of NLP in chat extensions moves Messenger even further away from the chat in chatbots. A similar change occurred in March when Messenger transitioned from 1.3 to 1.4. Then developers were given the choice of whether or not to display a text input field in their bot.

Webviews, Larionov told VentureBeat, allow bots to do things text could never accomplish.

“We’ve built a really powerful conversational mechanism with 1.0 and we never really paid too much attention to the structure,” he told VentureBeat after appearing onstage. “So now we are kind of catching up on that front. It’s always this dual hybrid model when you have bots. The combination of that really works best.”

Waylo is a bot that helps people find hotel deals. Founder and CEO Angik Sarkar attended both F8 functions with “bots” in the name Tuesday. Given the undelivered promise of bots that hold a conversation, he understands why Facebook took another step back from NLP, but he’s disappointed in the new forms of discovery and that bots will not be able to talk in groups. The removal of NLP from bots in groups scraps a bot wow factor. NLP bots may make mistakes, but webview can’t get smarter over time like NLP can.

“It’s a web app inside Messenger. That’s how I’d put it. It’s like they’re taking a core of a bot from a bot,” Sarkar said. “It’s not a bot anymore because it’s not listening to what a user is saying except for input you could have entered on a web page.”

Gaining new team and group opportunities

Tuesday also marked the first day of bots on Workplace by Facebook and its chat client Work Chat. Most bots on Slack, Cisco Spark, Microsoft Teams, and other platforms are able to speak to groups.

Kip is a bot that lets groups buy things, from offices ordering supplies or lunch together to a family who can shop together with the Kip bot. On Slack and Kik this is possible. Until today, it wasn’t possible on Messenger.

“Our core strength and focus is coordinating teams, and we couldn’t do that in the current state [of Messenger], so that’s why Kip on Messenger is really more for fun/quiz aspects and not very useful,” she said in a conversation before the launch. “If Messenger opens up to allow bots to interact and participate in group chats, then we could start working with informal teams and organizations to help them with collecting requests and coordinating group social buying.”

Mikael Yang is also happy about new additions for discovery and the group chat function. Yang is CEO of bot creation platform ManyChat. More than 20,000 bots have been created with the platform.

“The platform is open, but it’s not a free-for-all because then you’re not controlling the platform. Then you’re just a dumb pipe,” he said. “There has to be a balance between giving developers the tools and to build amazing things for the platform but then not exposing too much of the user info to developers because that can be misused.”

Bot developers who are concerned about a lack of listening or NLP in groups can still enjoy both features in one-to-one conversations, Yang said.

GameOn CEO Alex Beckham told VentureBeat last summer that he was anxious for Facebook to add group messaging to its bot offerings. When GameOn released its Sports Illustrated Rio 2016 bot, it found engagement highest on platforms that allowed groups to chat alongside a bot. In the same way the removal of NLP is good for Kip, it’s bad for GameOn, whose sports bots interact with groups. Still, Beckman said he and his team are excited about the amount of thinking Messenger has done about monetization opportunities that come with new forms of discovery. The parametric code at a local sports bar, for example, has a lot of potential for promotion, engagement, or sales.

“Nobody buys one ticket to a game. It’s more fun to have a group of buddies. We’ll get there,” he said. “Ultimately we think the best bot experiences are going to be enjoyed by groups of friends. That’s where we want this to head, but at the same time I’m excited by what came out.”

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Sours: https://venturebeat.com/2017/04/19/facebook-messenger-bots-work-in-groups-now-just-dont-expect-them-to-chat/
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Facebook Messenger launches group bots and bot discovery tab

Facebook today launched two powerful ways for people to find Messenger bots to use, addressing the discovery problem that’s plagued the platform’s 100,000 developers.

Facebook’s new Chat Extensions lets you use Messenger bots in group chats so you can watch a sports game’s play-by-play together from theScore’s news ticker bot, collaborate on building a Spotify playlist, figure out which hotel you want to stay at with friends and book it via SnapTravel or get a consensus on booking a flight through Kayak. OpenTable, the NBA, Food Network, WSJ and other developers are also launching group bots today. Apple Music is coming soon.

TechCrunch reported last month that Facebook would launch these group bots today at F8. Until now, bot experiences were just you and the bot. But that puts a ton of pressure on the bot to seem human. Chat Extensions pose them more as assistants or tickers rather than conversation partners, better matching what’s feasible with today’s technology.

The second big piece of bot discovery news is the launch of a Discovery tab on Messenger, where people can see their recently used bots, browse bot categories, see trending experiences or search for specific bots. Users will be able to check out a preview screen about what a bot does before starting a conversation with one. Developers need to submit a form with this preview information to be included in the curated tab.

Finally, Facebook is expanding its M Suggestions feature that uses AI to scan your conversations and recommend Messenger features to use. M will now start to suggest bots from outside developers that could serve a need that users are talking about. For example, if someone says “we should order food,” M could recommend delivery.com’s bot for making an order.

Together, these could give bots on Messenger more traction through virality in groups and merit via Facebook’s choices of what’s best. That could attract more prestigious developers to the platform. Facebook launched Messenger bots last year, but users had a tough time finding good ones; many bots disappointed people because they relied on inadequate AI, or they were confusing to use. Onstage today at Facebook’s F8 conference, Messenger head David Marcus said “I’m glad we called it a beta.”

Facebook has been trying to improve bots with the option to navigate via menus instead of text commands. And at F8, Messenger also launched QR codes for the physical world that open a specific experience inside a bot, as well as more features to help businesses. Meanwhile, bots like SnapTravel, which has done $1 million-worth of hotel bookings inside Messenger, prove that in-chat commerce is starting to work.

With today’s updates, bot developers will have good reason to fight through the churn rates and lack of user understanding. With 1.2 billion users on Messenger, there are plenty of people who could try their bots.

Sours: https://techcrunch.com/2017/04/18/facebook-bot-discovery/
How to Grow Facebook Group with Bots : Marketing Websites - Part 8

Bots for Workplace

Bots in Chat

While in groups, bots are able to consume and share information across a group of people asynchronously, bots in chat are best for direct real-time interaction with a single person or defined group of people.

For instance, a chat bot can be used to send important reminders or notifications to someone based on an upcoming event like an interview or a meeting. Work chat bots can also be used to engage with a user in a conversation and take follow up action based on feedback received.

This interaction model is based on the same concepts used by the Messenger Platform. As a result, work chat bots can use features like persistent menus, quick replies, and templates to enrich the user experience.

A bot can only reply to a Chat thread in which Bot is a member(1-1 chat or Groups chats). Additionally the Bot must have Message Any Member permission.

Bot-to-User Chat

When a bot has the Message Any Member permission, it will be allowed to send a direct message any person on Workplace via their email address or their Workplace ID via the Messenger Send API.

A bot in a new message typeahead

The Message Any Member permission also allows your bot to show up in typeaheads in Workplace chat surfaces.

A bot in a new message typeahead

By subscribing for Page Message webhooks, your bot will also get notified when a user messages your bot, and you can build a conversation flow by combining sending and receiving.

A bot-to-user conversation

Bot-to-Group Chat

Bots can also create, manage and be added to multi-person group chat threads. Bots can create new group threads by specifying a list of recipients, and can rename threads to create chat discussions on specific topics with specific people.

A named thread with specific people, created by a bot.

Enabling bots for group chats

To enable a bot to create group chats with Workplace users, open the Permissions panel of the Edit Custom Integration dialog, and check the box labelled Allow this integration to work in group chats.

Enabling a custom integration bot for group chat support.

By enabling group chat support, your bot will show up in the Add people typeaheads in an existing group chat thread. It will then receive webhooks for each message sent by people in that thread, and can reply to that thread using its .

Adding a bot to a group chat, then @-mentioning the bot

Creating new named threads

To create a new thread with specific recipients, make a request to the endpoint specifying an array of and an initial payload as follows:

POST /me/messages { "recipient": { "ids": [<user_ids>] }, "message": <message_payload> }

You'll get back a response payload that includes a , which you can use for follow-up messages.

If you use the same endpoint with the same list of recipients again, a new thread will be created. To send follow-up messages to an already-created thread, make a request to the /me/messages endpoint using the in the payload, as follows:

POST /me/messages { "recipient": { "thread_key": <thread_id> }, "message": <message_payload> }

To rename a thread created by your bot, make a request to the edge, as follows:

POST /t_<thread_id>/threadname { "name": "new name" }

Note the need to prefix the with "" in the edge path.

You can also get the list of participants of a thread by issuing GET requests on the edge, as follows:

GET /t_<thread_id>/?fields=participants

You can also add and remove participants from threads by issuing or requests on the edge, as follows:

POST t_<thread_id>/participants { "to": [<user_ids>] } DELETE t_<thread_id>/participants { "to": [<user_ids>] }
Sours: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/workplace/integrations/custom-integrations/bots/

Group bots facebook

AssumeZero Bot: A Facebook Messenger bot for group chats

My Final Project

For my final project, I thought I'd submit a project I've been working on throughout my entire college career. In a lot of ways, it has grown with me in that time, from a small toy script to a full codebase reflective of all the skills I've learned since I first 'd.

The simplest description of AssumeZero Bot is this: a chat bot that can be added to Facebook Messenger conversations to control and expose features either hidden or limited by the actual UI. It does this by interfacing with Schmavery's facebook-chat-api, an unofficial Messenger API that works by mimicking user requests made in the browser to trick Messenger into thinking that a real user sent them.

This allows it to be much more functional than Facebook's official API for bots, which only permits direct one-on-one communication with the bot. Pull requests to facebook-chat-api were some of my first open source contributions as I endeavored to add features to my bot that were not yet available in the API.

npm versionnpm downloadscode style: prettier

Facebook now has an official API for chat bots here.

This API is the only way to automate chat functionalities on a user account. We do this by emulating the browser. This means doing the exact same GET/POST requests and tricking Facebook into thinking we're accessing the website normally. Because we're doing it this way, this API won't work with an auth token but requires the credentials of a Facebook account.

Disclaimer: We are not responsible if your account gets banned for spammy activities such as sending lots of messages to people you don't know, sending messages very quickly, sending spammy looking URLs, logging in and out very quickly... Be responsible Facebook citizens.

See below for projects using this API.

See the full changelog for release details.

Install

If you just want to use facebook-chat-api, you should use this command:

npm install facebook-chat-api

It…

View on GitHub

Demo Link

The bot is available on Facebook Messenger, but I won't list the profile here to make it an easy target for being taken down. If you're interested in trying it out, I have instructions for cloning your own instance in the README of the repo.

Link to Code

About

AssumeZero Bot is a highly configurable bot that can be added to Facebook Messenger group chats. It is designed to expose features that may be hidden or made difficult to use by Messenger's UI, both on desktop and mobile. In addition to this functionality, it also connects to several different external services, like Spotify, Wolfram|Alpha, and OpenWeatherMap.

The bot was written with Node.js and the incredible Facebook Chat API, which allows the bot to emulate a Facebook user who can be added and removed from chats. As of this writing, Facebook's official API can still only be used in one-on-one conversations.

Usage

Most of the bot's features are activated with a "trigger word," which can be changed in . The default trigger word is "physics" and most commands will be in the form:

physics command [options]

To see a list of commands…

View on GitHub

How I built it

From this simple start, I've added tons of features to the bot over the past 4 years, including utility commands for splitting prices, looking up information, doing calculations, creating events and reminders (which Messenger itself no longer supports), and all kinds of other automated tasks that are useful for a group chat. I even added pinging (@ing other users in the chat) before Messenger itself had that feature!

Today, the bot is a fully-fledged service with automated deploys, easy configuration, and most recently, a framework that I've abstracted away to support other bots that I create and spin up new ones quickly: BotCore. AssumeZero Bot and my other Messenger bot projects are now built on BotCore, but BotCore itself was written by pulling out infrastructure that I wrote specifically for AssumeZero Bot and generalizing it to support a network of bot instances.

The bot (and BotCore) are written with NodeJS, fully in JavaScript. There is also a Python library fbchat similar to facebook-chat-api, but I decided to write it using JavaScript because I find it easiest to use for getting projects off the ground quickly, particularly ones that involve a web server. I also wanted to structure the bot's response system asynchronously, and I knew that JavaScript would be my best option for this (particularly back in 2016-2017).

Using Node gave me access to a huge number of packages through npm, which enabled me to add tons of functionality to the bot with ease. For example, the bot contains several image-editing commands powered by jimp. Whenever I was looking for a third-party solution to something, there was always an npm package at the top of the search results that gave me just what I needed.

This probably sounds like an ad for GitHub and its newly-acquired package manager, but I promise it's not! I have just seriously appreciated all of these services over the years, and I want to give credit where credit is due. The open source community has been a joy to work with while building this project and many others throughout college, and I see in hindsight how useful it was for me to have these tools at my disposal.

Sours: https://dev.to/astrocb/assumezero-bot-a-facebook-messenger-bot-for-group-chats-17ah
¿Cómo funcionan los bots en la política?

Back in 2016, Mark Zuckerberg announced the launch of Facebook's Messenger Platform -- a new service that enables businesses of all sizes to build custom bots in Messenger.

In the days following the announcement, the tech and marketing space lost its mind. Thousands of articles were penned about the news, each one speculating on what an open Messenger platform could mean for businesses' customer service teams.

Why all the ardor? For starters, Facebook Messenger already has about 1.3 billion monthly active users worldwide. Not registrants. Not people who got forced to download it when Facebook spun it out of the standard Facebook app. We're talking about active users who have adopted Messenger as a primary communication channel.

Learn More About HubSpot's Free Facebook Messenger Integration

Anytime a company as forward-looking as Facebook opens up a platform as heavily adopted as Messenger it should raise eyebrows. So the early excitement, well, it's justified. But what comes next is entirely undefined. And as marketers, we have an exciting opportunity to help shape it.

As Zuckerberg put it in his keynote, "No one wants to have to install a new app for every business or service they want to interact with.” And bots are much different than disjointed apps. In other words, building into the already popular Facebook Messenger app could enable businesses to get in front of customers without that added friction.

At least, that's the potential ...

What Is a Bot?

"Bot" is a generalized term used to describe any software that automates a task. Chatbots, which anyone can now build into Facebook Messenger, automate conversation -- at least the beginning stages of it.

What's special about the bots you can build on Facebook Messenger is that they're created using Facebook's Wit.ai Bot Engine, which can turn natural language into structured data. You can read more on this here, but in short, this means that not only can bots parse and understand conversational language, but they can also learn from it. In other words, your bot could get "smarter" with each interaction.

You've undoubtedly heard of artificial intelligence (AI). And this is a type of AI. Natural language interface is common in most chatbots, but by opening up the Messenger Platform and providing developer tools like the bot engine, Facebook has made building an intelligent bot easier.

How People Find Bots in Facebook Messenger

So, now comes the classic marketer question: If you build it, will they come?

The answer? Maybe.

Users are able to search for companies and bots inside Facebook Messenger by name, so you'll probably get some users that way. But, as with any new pathway into your company, you're likely to find that adoption of this communication channel within your customer base won't happen without some promotion. Facebook is trying to make that easier for businesses and organizations as well.

Here are a few tools and updates they've released to help simplify that connection:

Messenger Links

If you've created a Page for your business on Facebook, Messenger Links will use your Page’s username to create a short link (m.me/username). When someone clicks that link -- regardless of where they are -- it will open a conversation with your business in Messenger.

Customer Matching

If you have phone numbers for customers and pre-existing permission to reach out to them, you can find them on Facebook Messenger via customer matching. Conversations initiated through customer matching will include a final opt-in upon the first Facebook Messenger communication.

customer-matching.png

Image Credit: Facebook

Messenger Codes

Messenger codes are unique images that serve as a visual thumbprint for your business and bot on Messenger. If you are familiar with Snapchat codes, these visual cues act in the same way, redirecting anyone who scans them using Messenger to the corresponding company page or bot.

Facebook Messenger bot discovery button for CNN

Image Credit: Facebook

Messenger Buttons

You can embed these buttons, provided by Facebook, into your website to enable anyone who clicks them to start a Messenger conversation with your company.

Facebook Messenger bot CTA buttons

Image Credit: Facebook

For all of the above, if you haven't developed a bot, the result will be a standard Messenger-based conversation. So you'll want to be sure you're monitoring that channel.

5 Examples of Branded Facebook Messenger Bots

Written definitions of bots are one thing, but sometimes it helps to understand how a bot works in action. Let's take a look at a few early examples ...

1. 1-800-Flowers

The example Mark Zuckerberg lauded in his keynote was the ability to send flowers from 1-800-Flowers without actually having to call the 1-800 number. A user, Danny Sullivan, subsequently tried it by sending flowers to Zuckerberg himself and documented the five-minute process here.

The bot took Sullivan through a few floral options and then confirmed shipping details.

Facebook Messenger bot conversation by Danny Sullivan

Image Credit: Marketing Land

2. Wall Street Journal

With the Wall Street Journal bot, users can get live stock quotes by typing "$" followed by the ticker symbol. They can also get the top headlines delivered to them inside of Messenger.

3. HP

HP created a bot for Messenger that enables users to print photos, documents, and files from Facebook or Messenger to any connected HP printer.

HP_PrintBot_Photo_NEW_Screen.png

Image Credit: HP

4. Facebook M

Facebook is releasing its own bot for Messenger, a personal assistant bot named "M." M can answer a wide range of requests -- from restaurant recommendations, to complex trivia, to last-minute hotel rates in the city.

Its flexibility is due to the fact that M is actually a bot-human hybrid. As Facebook’s chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer told Recode: "It's primarily powered by people, but those people are effectively backed up by AIs." While the bots act as a first line of defense in fielding questions, the difficult questions are quickly routed to human assistants.

Facebook_M_Bot.png

Image Credit: The Next Web

5. Healthtap

Healthtap is an interactive healthcare provider that connects users to advice from medical professionals. On the heels of the platform announcement, Healthtap created a bot that enables users to type a medical question into Facebook Messenger and receive a free response from a doctor or browse articles of similar questions.

You can see here how the conversational interface works. The user in this example is inquiring in natural language about a specific health concern. From the user's standpoint, this is similar to texting a friend.

Conversation with the Facebook Messenger bot of Healthtap

Image Credit: mobihealthnews

This set up also helps the company filter inbound requests by solving some patient questions with existing responses first and then surfacing unique queries for live response.

(Intrigued by these examples? Engadget has a longer list of bots that are either released or under development for Facebook Messenger.)

Should You Build a Facebook Messenger Bot for Business?

Ah, see that's not the sort of question I can answer for you. Building a bot for Facebook Messenger, like any marketing or product endeavor, is going to take resources -- mainly staff time and expertise -- and may not result in the outcomes you'd like to see.

That said, here's my best guidance for how you can determine if a Facebook Messenger Bot would benefit your business:

Do you have a clear use case for your bot?

One of the biggest reasons so many companies went astray in building mobile apps for their businesses is that they saw it as just another version of their website. They didn't take the time to study how being on a mobile device would change the types of interactions their customers would want to have with their company.

Some tasks are just not well-suited for mobile. As a result, many apps sit unused. When you're thinking about a use case for Facebook Messenger, make sure you're thinking about it from the standpoint of the customer or user, not from the company's standpoint.

Here are a few examples of use cases you might consider for a Facebook Messenger bot:

Lead Nurturing

Perhaps you're having trouble moving leads from one part of your buyer's journey to another, and need a way to nurture their interest after they first discover your website or content and return to learn more.

Sharing Your Knowledge Base

Traditionally speaking, a knowledge base is a section of your website that organizes all the resources and information a customer would need to properly learn and solve problems related to your product. And sometimes, these knowledge bases can be cumbersome or hard to search through. A Facebook Messenger Bot is one way to better educate customers who have questions about your product.

Diversifying Service Lines

If your customer service team has more incoming requests than they can handle, it might be because they're only taking them through the phone. Live chat bots can open more request lines, lower call volume, and allow service and support representatives to balance more questions at a time.

Sharing Questions Across the Customer Service Team

If your customer service employees need a better way to share questions with one another as they field them, the right Facebook Messenger bot can loop in more employees more quickly to solve problems.

Retaining Ecommerce Shoppers During Checkout

You suffer from "abandoned shopping carts" on your ecommerce website, and need a way to retain shoppers who might have trouble during the checkout process.

Is your audience on Facebook?

This question is often too quickly dismissed by companies that see Facebook as a purely social platform, rather than one for businesses. Even if your audience doesn't currently use Facebook for business needs, you need to start by determining whether or not the potential for Facebook marketing is there.

If you have an audience who uses Facebook heavily in their personal lives, they're likely to adopt Messenger as a communications tool. And how they use Messenger may expand beyond how they use Facebook. Today, usage of messaging apps has actually outpaced that of social networks. And as new use cases arise, behavior evolves with them.

Can you support inbound inquiries from Messenger?

Don't open a communication channel with your prospective and existing customers if you can't support it. Even with the automation of a bot, you'll still need to carve out time to do three important things:

  1. Promote your chatbot
  2. Monitor any questions your bot can't answer
  3. keep tabs on the overall customer experience you're creating with it

If you've thought through the above three questions and think you've got a good foundation for a Facebook Messenger bot then dive in. There's a benefit to being an early adopter in this space. And as a newly open platform, Facebook Messenger needs thoughtful and strategic companies to shape it.

Free Resource: How to Reach & Engage Your Audience on Facebook

Sours: https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/facebook-bots-guide

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Bots for Workplace

Bots in Chat

While in groups, bots are able to consume and share information across a group of people asynchronously, bots in chat are best for direct real-time interaction with a single person or defined group of people.

For instance, a chat bot can be used to send important reminders or notifications to someone based on an upcoming event like an interview or a meeting. Work chat bots can also be used to engage with a user in a conversation and take follow up action based on feedback received.

This interaction model is based on the same concepts used by the Messenger Platform. As a result, work chat bots can use features like persistent menus, quick replies, and templates to enrich the user experience.

Bot-to-User Chat

When a bot has the Message Any Member permission, it will be allowed to send a direct message any person on Workplace via their email address or their Workplace ID via the Messenger Send API.

A bot in a new message typeahead

The Message Any Member permission also allows your bot to show up in typeaheads in Workplace chat surfaces.

A bot in a new message typeahead

By subscribing for Page Message webhooks, your bot will also get notified when a user messages your bot, and you can build a conversation flow by combining sending and receiving.

A bot-to-user conversation

Bot-to-Group Chat

When a bot has Message Any Member & Group Chat Bot permissions it can create, manage and be added to multi-person group chat threads. Bots can create new group threads by specifying a list of recipients, and can rename threads to create chat discussions on specific topics with specific people.

A named thread with specific people, created by a bot.

By enabling group chat support, your bot will show up in the Add people typeaheads in an existing group chat thread. It will then receive webhooks for each message sent by people in that thread, and can reply to that thread using its .

Adding a bot to a group chat, then @-mentioning the bot

Creating new named threads

To create a new thread with specific recipients, make a request to the endpoint specifying an array of and an initial payload as follows:

POST /me/messages { "recipient": { "ids": [<user_ids>] }, "message": <message_payload> }

You'll get back a response payload that includes a , which you can use for follow-up messages.

If you use the same endpoint with the same list of recipients again, a new thread will be created. To send follow-up messages to an already-created thread, make a request to the /me/messages endpoint using the in the payload, as follows:

POST /me/messages { "recipient": { "thread_key": <thread_id> }, "message": <message_payload> }

To rename a thread created by your bot, make a request to the edge, as follows:

POST /t_<thread_id>/threadname { "name": "new name" }

Note the need to prefix the with "" in the edge path.

You can also add and remove participants from threads by issuing or requests on the edge as follows:

POST t_<thread_id>/participants { "to": [<user_ids>] } DELETE t_<thread_id>/participants { "to": [<user_ids>] }

Notice that operations on the edge are available for threads created by the integration.

Being mentioned on a thread

When your bot is mentioned on a message our webhooks will send the list of tagged members on that message, as the following payload:

{ "object":"page", "entry":[{ "id":"746230239054322", "time":1539281406974, "messaging":[{ ... "message":{ "mid":"<message id>", "seq":2192, "text":"@Edu Gomes @Example Bot What's 2+2?" }, "mentions":[{ "offset":0, "length":10, "id":"100017376437045" }, { "offset":11, "length":12, "id":"746230239054322" }] }] }] }
Sours: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/workplace/bots/


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