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Occupational Health and Safety Manager salary in United States

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57% of Occupational health and safety managers in the United States think their salaries are enough for the cost of living in their area.

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Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Career, Salary and Education Information

What They Do: Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians collect data on and analyze many types of work environments and work procedures.

Work Environment: Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians work in a variety of settings, such as offices or factories. Their jobs often involve considerable fieldwork and travel. Most work full time.

How to Become One: Occupational health and safety specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree in occupational health and safety or in a related scientific or technical field. Occupational health and safety technicians typically enter the occupation through one of two paths: on-the-job training or postsecondary education, such as an associate’s degree or certificate.

Salary: The median annual wage for occupational health and safety specialists is $76,340. The median annual wage for occupational health and safety technicians is $53,340.

Job Outlook: Overall employment of occupational health and safety specialists and technicians is projected to grow 4 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Specialists and technicians will be needed in a wide variety of industries to ensure that employers adhere to both existing and new regulations.

Related Careers: Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of occupational health and safety specialists and technicians with similar occupations.

Following is everything you need to know about a career as an occupational health and safety specialist or technician with lots of details. As a first step, take a look at some of the following jobs, which are real jobs with real employers. You will be able to see the very real job career requirements for employers who are actively hiring. The link will open in a new tab so that you can come back to this page to continue reading about the career:

Top 3 Occupational Health and Safety Specialist Jobs

  • Occupational Health and Safety Specialist - Pet Food Express - Oakland, CA

    Reporting to the Human Resources Director, the Safety Specialist will work with our store ... in an occupational health and safety , risk management, workers' compensation or similar role ...

  • Safety Specialist - Southwire Company - Rancho Cucamonga, CA

    In support of a lean culture, the Safety Specialist 's responsibilities consist of providing ... This includes safety and occupational health process. * Lead and oversee the Kaizen Optimizer ...

  • Site Safety Specialists-ED-62825 - Securitas Security Services - San Francisco, CA

    Summary The Site Safety Specialist (SSS) provides support for the LinkedIn EHS program to ... Experience in auditing and performing tasks associated with an occupational safety program is ...

See all Occupational Health and Safety Specialist jobs

Top 3 Occupational Health and Safety Technician Jobs

  • CMA/Occupational Health Technician - Medical Network of Alaska - Wasilla, AK

    Monday-Friday 9:00am-6:00pm Summary The Occupational Health Technician /Certified Medical Assistant ... Language Skills Ability to read and interpret documents such as safety rules, operating and ...

  • Environmental Health & Safety Technician - nLight - Vancouver, WA

    S., China, and Europe. nLIGHT is seeking an Environmental Health & Safety Technician to join our ... Requires an Associate Degree in Occupational Safety , Environmental Science, Engineering, Science or ...

  • Safety Technician - ATI, Inc. - Nellis Air Force Base, NV

    ... and health hazards. Candidate Duties: * Work with personnel to understand the strategy for ... * Assist Occupational Safety Manager in administering the Training Program with required ...

See all Occupational Health and Safety Technician jobs

What Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians Do[About this section] [To Top]

Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians collect data on and analyze many types of work environments and work procedures. Specialists inspect workplaces for adherence to regulations on safety, health, and the environment. Technicians work with specialists in conducting tests and measuring hazards to help prevent harm to workers, property, the environment, and the general public.

Duties of Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians typically do the following:

  • Inspect, test, and evaluate workplace environments, equipment, and practices to ensure that they follow safety standards and government regulations
  • Prepare written reports on their findings
  • Design and implement workplace processes and procedures that help protect workers from hazardous work conditions
  • Evaluate programs on workplace health and safety
  • Educate employers and workers about workplace safety by preparing and providing training programs
  • Demonstrate the correct use of safety equipment
  • Investigate incidents and accidents to identify what caused them and how they might be prevented

Occupational health and safety specialists examine the workplace for environmental or physical factors that could affect employee health, safety, comfort, and performance. They may examine factors such as lighting, equipment, materials, and ventilation. Technicians may check to make sure that workers are using required protective gear, such as masks and hardhats.

Some develop and conduct employee safety and training programs. These programs cover a range of topics, such as how to use safety equipment correctly and how to respond in an emergency.

Work Environment for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Occupational health and safety specialists hold about 100,500 jobs. The largest employers of occupational health and safety specialists are as follows:

Government22%
Manufacturing17%
Construction11%
Management, scientific, and technical consulting services6%
Hospitals; state, local, and private4%

Occupational health and safety technicians hold about 22,100 jobs. The largest employers of occupational health and safety technicians are as follows:

Manufacturing21%
Government12%
Construction10%
Management, scientific, and technical consulting services9%
Hospitals; state, local, and private4%

Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians work in a variety of settings, such as offices or factories. Their jobs often involve considerable fieldwork and travel. They may be exposed to strenuous, dangerous, or stressful conditions. They use gloves, helmets, respirators, and other personal protective and safety equipment to minimize the risk of illness and injury.

Occupational Health and Safety Specialist and Technician Work Schedules

Most occupational health and safety specialists and technicians work full time. Some may work weekends or irregular hours in emergencies.

How to Become an Occupational Health and Safety Specialist or Technician[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need:Find schools for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians near you!

Occupational health and safety specialists typically need a bachelor's degree in occupational health and safety or in a related scientific or technical field. Occupational health and safety technicians typically enter the occupation through one of two paths: on-the-job training or postsecondary education, such as an associate's degree or certificate.

Education for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Occupational health and safety specialists typically need a bachelor's degree in occupational health and safety or a related scientific or technical field, such as engineering, biology, or chemistry. For some positions, a master's degree in industrial hygiene, health physics, or a related subject is required. In addition to science courses, typical courses include ergonomics, writing and communications, occupational safety management, and accident prevention.

Employers typically require technicians to have at least a high school diploma. High school students interested in this occupation should complete courses in English, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and physics.

Some employers prefer to hire technicians who have earned an associate's degree or certificate from a community college or vocational school. These programs typically take 2 years or less. They include courses in respiratory protection, hazard communication, and material-handling and storage procedures.

Important Qualities for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Ability to use technology. Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians must be able to use advanced technology. They often work with complex testing equipment.

Communication skills. Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians must be able to communicate safety instructions and concerns to employees and managers. They frequently prepare written reports and prepare and deliver safety training to other workers.

Detail oriented. Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians need to understand and follow safety standards and complex government regulations.

Physical stamina. Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians must be able to stand for long periods and be able to travel regularly. Some work in environments that can be uncomfortable, such as tunnels or mines.

Problem-solving skills. Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians must be able to solve problems in order to design and implement workplace processes and procedures that help protect workers from hazardous conditions.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Although certification is voluntary, many employers encourage it. Certification is available through several organizations, depending on the field in which the specialists work. Specialists must have graduated from an accredited educational program and have work experience to be eligible to take most certification exams. To keep their certification, specialists usually are required to complete periodic continuing education.

Occupational safety and health specialists and technicians can earn professional certifications including the following:

  • The Board of Certified Safety Professionals offers the following certifications:
    • Certified Safety Professional (CSP) certification
    • Associate Safety Professional (ASP)
    • Occupational Health and Safety Technologist (OHST)
    • Construction Health and Safety Technician (CHST)
  • The American Board of Industrial Hygiene awards a certification known as a Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH)

Occupational Health and Safety Specialist and Technician Training

Occupational health and safety technicians usually receive on-the-job training. They learn about specific laws and inspection procedures, and learn to conduct tests and recognize hazards. The length of training varies with the employee's level of experience, education, and industry in which he or she works.

Some technicians enter the occupation through a combination of related work experience and training. They may take on health and safety tasks at the company where they are employed. For example, an employee may volunteer to complete annual workstation inspections for an office in which he or she already works.

Occupational Health and Safety Specialist and Technician Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for occupational health and safety specialists is $76,340. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $44,710, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $112,850.

The median annual wage for occupational health and safety technicians is $53,340. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $33,330, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $89,780.

The median annual wages for occupational health and safety specialists in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Manufacturing$77,370
Hospitals; state, local, and private$77,160
Government$74,720
Construction$74,550
Management, scientific, and technical consulting services$73,740

The median annual wages for occupational health and safety technicians in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Construction$58,370
Manufacturing$52,230
Government$52,210
Management, scientific, and technical consulting services$47,890
Hospitals; state, local, and private$44,140

Most occupational health and safety specialists and technicians work full time. Some specialists may work weekends or irregular hours in emergencies.

Job Outlook for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Employment of occupational health and safety specialists is projected to grow 4 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment of occupational health and safety technicians is projected to grow 5 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations.

Specialists and technicians will be needed to work in a variety of industries and government agencies to ensure that employers are adhering to both existing and new regulations. In addition, specialists will be necessary because insurance costs and workers' compensation costs have become a concern for many employers and insurance companies. An aging population is remaining in the workforce longer than past generations did, and older workers usually have a greater proportion of workers' compensation claims.

Job Prospects for Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Applicants for jobs as occupational health and safety specialists or technicians with a background in the sciences, experience in more than one area of health and safety, or certification will have the best prospects.

Occupational TitleEmployment, 2019Projected Employment, 2029Change, 2019-29
PercentNumeric
Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians122,600127,40044,800
  Occupational health and safety specialists100,500104,30043,800
  Occupational health and safety technicians22,10023,10051,000

Careers Related to Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Construction and Building Inspectors

Construction and building inspectors ensure that construction meets local and national building codes and ordinances, zoning regulations, and contract specifications.

Environmental Science and Protection Technicians

Environmental science and protection technicians monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution and contamination, including those affecting public health.

Environmental Scientists and Specialists

Environmental scientists and specialists use their knowledge of the natural sciences to protect the environment and human health. They may clean up polluted areas, advise policymakers, or work with industry to reduce waste.

Fire Inspectors

Fire inspectors examine buildings in order to detect fire hazards and ensure that federal, state, and local fire codes are met. Fire investigators, another type of worker in this field, determine the origin and cause of fires and explosions. Forest fire inspectors and prevention specialists assess outdoor fire hazards in public and residential areas.

Health and Safety Engineers

Health and safety engineers develop procedures and design systems to protect people from illness and injury and property from damage. They combine knowledge of engineering and of health and safety to make sure that chemicals, machinery, software, furniture, and other products will not cause harm to people or damage to property.



A portion of the information on this page is used by permission of the U.S. Department of Labor.


Explore more careers: View all Careers or the Top 30 Career Profiles



Sours: https://collegegrad.com/careers/occupational-health-and-safety-specialists-and-technicians
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Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018

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29-9011 Occupational Health and Safety Specialists

Review, evaluate, and analyze work environments and design programs and procedures to control, eliminate, and prevent disease or injury caused by chemical, physical, and biological agents or ergonomic factors. May conduct inspections and enforce adherence to laws and regulations governing the health and safety of individuals. May be employed in the public or private sector. Includes environmental protection officers.


National estimates for this occupation
Industry profile for this occupation
Geographic profile for this occupation

National estimates for this occupation:

Employment estimate and mean wage estimates for this occupation:

Employment (1)Employment
RSE (3)
Mean hourly
wage
Mean annual
wage (2)
Wage RSE (3)
88,3901.0 %$36.03$74,9400.3 %

Percentile wage estimates for this occupation:

Percentile 10% 25% 50%
(Median)
75% 90%
Hourly Wage $20.41$26.95$35.11$43.76$52.17
Annual Wage (2)$42,450$56,060$73,020$91,030$108,520


Industry profile for this occupation:

Industries with the highest published employment and wages for this occupation are provided. For a list of all industries with employment in this occupation, see the Create Customized Tables function.

Industries with the highest levels of employment in this occupation:

Industry Employment (1) Percent of industry employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
Federal Executive Branch (OES Designation) 7,0200.35$40.60$84,450
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OES Designation) 6,8700.13$31.85$66,250
State Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OES Designation) 6,2000.28$29.70$61,770
Management, Scientific, and Technical Consulting Services 5,7500.40$35.95$74,770
Management of Companies and Enterprises 3,8100.16$40.33$83,880

Industries with the highest concentration of employment in this occupation:

Top paying industries for this occupation:

Industry Employment (1) Percent of industry employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, and Payroll Services 30(7)$48.60$101,080
Pipeline Transportation of Crude Oil 1301.22$47.54$98,890
Scientific Research and Development Services 1,5600.23$45.06$93,730
Oil and Gas Extraction 1,1000.78$43.68$90,840
Natural Gas Distribution 3300.30$43.67$90,820


Geographic profile for this occupation:

States and areas with the highest published employment, location quotients, and wages for this occupation are provided. For a list of all areas with employment in this occupation, see the Create Customized Tables function.





States with the highest employment level in this occupation:

State Employment (1) Employment per thousand jobs Location quotient (9) Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
Texas 11,8700.981.60$36.40$75,720
California 7,5600.440.73$42.50$88,400
Pennsylvania 4,3700.751.22$33.81$70,330
Ohio 4,2800.791.30$36.90$76,740
New York 3,7800.400.66$36.55$76,020




States with the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients in this occupation:

State Employment (1) Employment per thousand jobs Location quotient (9) Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
Wyoming 4201.572.57$36.92$76,790
Alaska 4901.542.52$41.80$86,940
Montana 5801.252.04$33.60$69,890
North Dakota 4801.151.88$42.53$88,470
New Mexico 9401.151.89$34.83$72,440




Top paying States for this occupation:




Sours: https://www.bls.gov/oes/2018/may/oes299011.htm
A Career in Health and Safety-Live video from the HSE Congress

Top 3 Best Paying Jobs in Occupational Health and Safety

occupational safety and health degree salary

Occupational health and safety jobs can be highly rewarding as they set the standards and conditions that protect employee welfare in the workplace. Depending on the types of jobs in the safety field an applicant is interested in, the positions can also offer high salaries. Entry level safety jobs, as well as health and safety jobs available for more experienced or higher educated applicants, are a staple of many industries and openings are growing on pace with the economy. As you consider beginning your education in occupational health and safety as you earn your degree, keep in mind these positions that offer above-average salaries and extraordinary fulfillment as you care for the wellbeing of others.

Choosing the Highest Paying Occupational Health Careers

1. Occupational Health and Safety Technicians

Occupational health and safety technicians use their undergraduate education to ensure that workers are acting appropriately in the workplace and not inadvertently causing dangerous situations that could lead to their own injuries or circumstances that injure others. These technicians make sure that any safety equipment required on job sites is available to the employees who need them and are being used appropriately. They also work to ensure that safety standards and guidelines are being followed. These are considered entry level safety jobs but still carry median salaries close to $55,000 per year, depending on the industry.

2. Occupational Health and Safety Specialists

Occupational health and safety specialists require an undergraduate degree plus some industry experience. Among health and safety jobs, they are also well-paid, with median wages topping $70,000 per year. Specialists are often health and safety professionals who began as technicians and moved into the next level position after gaining industry experience. Instead of working to make sure workplace regulations and safety standards are followed, these specialists are the professionals who research, design and implement those standards. Additionally, they may oversee the work of technicians, specifically auditing or inspecting to ensure the highest level of safety is observed on the job.

3. Health and Safety Engineers

Occupational health and safety jobs often require programs or systems to be designed that call upon engineering skills. Some colleges and universities offer programs that either includes engineering classes or specializations through their occupational health and safety degrees, or the opportunity to earn concurrent degrees in safety and engineering to prepare for this career field. Engineering jobs in the safety field consider entire workplaces or work systems to determine procedures and guidelines that protect employees throughout the work cycle. This can include building specialized equipment, redesigning the layout of the workplace, or engineering new processes that heighten safety standards. Health and safety engineers earn a median income of $88,510 per year. In certain fields, specifically, those related to science, those earnings can swell to a mid-range of $100,000 per year.

Finding Your Occupational Health and Safety Niche

Occupational health and safety jobs can be found throughout many different industries, including construction, manufacturing, engineering, science, mining, and exploration. Job duties may take individuals from comfortable inside environments out to more challenging outside areas and even workplaces that are underground or offshore. With the field growing on pace with the economy, there will be a continued need for employees in the health and safety field for the foreseeable future. You can work in staff, management or consulting roles, all calling upon your education and training to ensure you achieve the best possible results in employee safety.

Sours: https://www.valuecolleges.com/resources/highest-paying-occupational-health-safety-jobs/

Salary safety degree

Bachelor of Science (BS / BSc), Occupational Health and Safety Degree

Bachelor of Science (BS / BSc), Occupational Health and Safety
Avg. Base Salary (USD)
4.0

Overall Job Satisfaction

Related Degrees by Salary

Degrees in the same industry as Bachelor of Science (BS / BSc), Occupational Health and Safety, ranked by salary

Years of Experience

This data is based on 798 survey responses.

Gender Breakdown

Male

83.4%

Avg. Salary: $50k - $111k

Female

16.0%

Avg. Salary: $48k - $96k

This data is based on 779 survey responses. Learn more about the gender pay gap.

Job Satisfaction

4 out of 5

(398)

Highly Satisfied

Popular Companies for Bachelor of Science (BS / BSc), Occupational Health and Safety Degrees

Pay ranges for people with a Bachelor of Science (BS / BSc), Occupational Health and Safety degree by employer.

Sours: https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Degree=Bachelor_of_Science_(BS_%2F_BSc)%2C_Occupational_Health_and_Safety/Salary
A Career in Health and Safety-Live video from the HSE Congress

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