1hp gas engine

1hp gas engine DEFAULT

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One Horse Show: Mike Healy’s 1 hp Engine Collection

Author Photo

By Bill Vossler

1 / 17

Circa-1911-1912 1 hp Domestic.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

2 / 17

A close-up of the 1 hp Domestic’s sideshaft, uncommon on small engines.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

3 / 17

Domestic identification plate.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

4 / 17

Early Monitor engines had the intake and exhaust valves side by side, stems down. Later engines had a smaller valve chest with the intake on top.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

5 / 17

Monitor identification plate.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

6 / 17

The hand-hole inspection cover for access to the crankcase.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

7 / 17

Mike Healy with the Monitor. Note the canteen-shaped cast gas tank.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

8 / 17

Janet Healy with the 1 hp air-cooled Quincy. Very little is known about these engines and it’s possible it was never put into series production.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

9 / 17

Quincy identification plate.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

10 / 17

The cooling fan on the Quincy.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

11 / 17

Ignition timing can be adjusted to suit engine speed.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

12 / 17

The Healy’s 1913 1 hp Root & Vandervoort is igniter fired. Like all Root & Vandervoort engines, its construction is top notch.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

13 / 17

Root & Vandervoort identification plate.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

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The pulley side of the 1 hp Root & Vandervoort. The Root & Vandervoort logo was one of the more stylish of the time.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

15 / 17

A closer view of the Root & Vandervoort’s two-ball governor.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

16 / 17

This ad for a Pennsylvania-built Quincy engine and air compressor rig appeared in a 1913 issue of Engineering News Record.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

17 / 17

Quincy in Illinois manufactured gas and Corliss steam engines, as trumpeted in this ad in the October 1905 Engineer’s Review.

Photo by Nikki Rajala

❮❯

A series of events led Mike Healy into the gasoline engine hobby. “I was a town boy, but my dad and uncles were raised on a farm, so we all attended the steam show in our little town of Fulton, Missouri, in the 1960s. I enjoyed steam, but I was intrigued by the gas engines early,” the 63-year-old collector says.

In 1974, Mike bought a 1939 1-1/4 hp Monitor engine at a farm sale. A local gentleman introduced himself, and invited Mike over. “Henry Matteson and I got to be good friends, and he mentored me early on. I bought a 1911 1 hp Monitor from his son after Henry’s passing. That was a turning point. I saw differences between my 1-1/4 and 1 hp Monitors. For instance, increasing the horsepower only required increasing the flywheel diameter by 1/4 inch. That really intrigued me. It was greater in the 2, 3, and 4 hp engines. After that I started looking at smaller engines.”

As his collection of 1 hp engines grew, Mike started showing them, but with a purpose. “I’d never seen anybody show the different engine styles at one time, so we decided to do that,” Mike says. Those engines included a Domestic sideshaft, a Monitor upright, a Quincy air-cooled, and a Root & Vandervoort igniter-equipped engine.

Mike has high praise for the Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, Midwest Old Settlers & Threshers Reunion, where he likes to show his engines and which draws a wide cross-section of people. “We think up phrases to describe what we have at a show, and for these four it’s ‘One Horse Show.’ A theme encourages the general public to stop and visit, which we enjoy,” Mike says.

Circa-1911-1912 1 hp Domestic

Manufacturer: Domestic Engine & Pump Co., Shippensburg, PA
Year: Circa 1911-1912
Serial Number: 10084
Horsepower: 1 hp @ 300rpm (est.)
Bore & stroke: 3-1/2in x 4in
Flywheel dia: 14in x 1-1/2in
Ignition: Spark plug w/battery & coil
Governing: Hit-and-miss flywheel weights
Cooling: Hopper, 15 gallons

A sideshaft Domestic engine was on the list of engines Mike wanted, so he went to an auction where one was being sold. “At the auction, another gentleman had the same idea, so I had to give a lot of money to get it. The previous owner had added brass when he restored it, so I knew it would make a nice display.” The real draw, he says, is the design of the engine. “With that sideshaft there’s a lot to watch; the cam and ignition and exhaust valve. Yet despite all that, the Domestic is quiet as can be and it has a really good muffler design.” With pushrod engines, he adds, you always hear the roller come around on the cam gear and make a “plunking” noise.

Mike says his 1 hp Domestic is similar to his 1-1/2 hp Domestic, except for additions by the previous owner. “He dialed it up so it is eye-catching. The 1 hp Domestic is unique because not many companies built a 1 hp sideshaft. We get a lot of compliments on this engine, wherever we take it.” Restoration work included reworking the cylinder and piston. “The engine had been setting for quite a while, so it needed to be totally gone through.”

Mike says the Domestic is a quality piece of equipment, well machined and highly dependable. “That area of Pennsylvania [Shippensburg] is well known for quality mechanical work. These one horses were lightweight and could be moved all over the farm, mostly to pump water, as well as run washing machines; one ad shows a woman rolling it next to a washing machine.”

Discussing Domestic engines in American Gasoline Engines Since 1872, author C.H. Wendel says, “The exceptionally tall water hopper permitted longer runs without attention and gave a distinctive appearance. These engines were shipped on skids, with battery and all connections in place and ready to run.” Sister Domestic engines of the same era came in 2 hp and 3 hp, with 4 x 6 and 5 x 6-inch bore and stroke, respectively.

1911 1 hp Monitor

Manufacturer: Baker Mfg. Co., Evansville, WI
Year: 1911
Serial Number: 5864
Horsepower: 1 hp @ 500rpm
Bore & stroke: 3-1/2in x 4in
Flywheel dia: 17-1/2in x 2-1/4in
Ignition: Spark plug w/battery & coil
Governing: Hit-and-miss flywheel weights
Cooling: Hopper

Most collectors never get to see the upright style 1 hp Monitor, Mike says. It really is that rare – in fact it’s not even listed in Wendel‘s gas engine encylopedia, possibly because all company records were destroyed in 1944. “It has a special meaning to me because it belonged to Henry Madsen, and it got me started collecting,” Mike says.

Beyond its rarity, a few other things make this engine unique. “There’s the canteen-shaped cast iron gas tank, which was changed to a more efficient design after a year or so, and the design of the exhaust and intake valve.” On early engines, both valves were in a pronounced chest on the side of the cylinder, stems facing down. Later engines moved the valves closer into the cylinder, with the valves opposite each other, intake up and exhaust down. Along with bringing the flywheel closer to the side of the engine, those changes made the engine more efficient, and streamlined.

Another unique feature is the hand-hole inspection opening on the side of the crankcase where operators could oil the connecting rod. “On the early engines the cover slid up, and I’d guess that piece got lost or thrown away pretty easily. Very few were made with this early design. The new design had the cover hinged on the bottom and a wing nut on top,” Mike notes.

Circa-1911-1912 1 hp Quincy

Manufacturer: Quincy Engine Co., Quincy, PA
Year: Circa 1911-1912
Serial Number: 264
Horsepower: 1 hp @ 500rpm
Bore & stroke: N/A
Flywheel dia: 16in x 1-1/2in
Ignition: Spark plug w/battery & coil
Governing: Hit-and-miss
Cooling: Air w/fan

Janet Healy, Mike’s wife, grew up in Quincy, Illinois, prior to coming to Fulton to teach with Mike in the Missouri School for the Deaf. So when they saw a Quincy, Illinois, engine, they bought it. That led to the pair buying another Quincy engine, this one manufactured by Quincy Engine Co. of Quincy, Pennsylvania.

The Healys had become friends with Quincy engine lover Dick Shelley, and when Dick passed away they bought his 2 hp Pennsylvania Quincy engine. “There is no connection between the Quincy engines except the name, and when this 1911 or 1912 1 hp Quincy Pennsylvania engine came up for sale, I knew it was rare because there aren‘t many of either style around.” The engines are totally different, Mike says, with the Illinois Quincy being throttle-governed, for example, and the Pennsylvania hit-and-miss.”

Mike restored the Quincy engine. “Having it apart showed me the high quality of the engine. The machining work is unbelievable, much better than a lot of other engines,” Mike says. The heavy cast bronze tag bespeaks the quality, and showed that the company took pride in their work, Mike adds.

However, Mike doesn’t think this Quincy was put into production. “That happened lots of times,” Mike says. “They‘d make three or four and sell them, and correct problems with a new variety of the engine.” Mike says this engine probably has the best governor of all the small engines they have. “The governor is very well designed. The speed can be adjusted with a thumb nut on a spring behind the crankshaft. A lever in front of the crankshaft above the camshaft cam gear allows you to advance and retard the ignition to the speed of the engine. It’s a really well-thought-out design, and a steady-running engine. Often a governor has flywheel weights that lock a lever, keeping the exhaust valve open. It runs at the same speed all the time. This design has five parts, including a set of stationary springs against the weight on the flywheel, with a little fork design to put resistance against the weight of the flywheel. It takes a lot more work to build parts like that and machine them. So it’s really quite detailed,” he says.

This Quincy fires on every rotation. “It was an early design, it’s intriguing. They didn’t stop the spark plugs from firing during the time it was coasting.” This 1 hp Quincy is probably one of only three in existence.

1913 1 hp Root & Vandervoort

Manufacturer: Root and Vandervoort Eng. Co., East Moline, IL
Year: 1913
Serial Number: AL23532
Horsepower: 1 hp @ 500rpm
Bore & stroke: 3-1/4in x 4in
Flywheel dia: 15in x 1-1/2in
Ignition: Igniter w/coil and battery
Governing: Hit-and-miss, horizontal flyball off cam gear
Cooling: Hopper

Rounding out the styles of 1 hp engines in the Healys’ collection is a 1913 1 hp Root & Vandervoort igniter-equipped engine. The igniter feature was a draw, but they also bought the engine because it was sold by John Deere Plow Co., before they created their Type E engine, Mike says. “That one caught our eye when we wanted a 1 hp igniter-fired engine, and I liked the tie-in with the John Deere dealerships. We had to chase down a guy on a trailer to get it. It’s another well-built and quality engine.”

The R&V did require a lot of work. “It wasn’t restored, so I had to go through it and make some parts, including on the governor system. This was the first year the governor went from flywheel weight to a two-ball governor that ran off the cam. I had to remake a few pieces that were lightweight. The company was trying to save money, I suppose,” Mike says. The engine received a thorough work over, with much of its mechanical hardware including timing gears being replaced. The R&V engine’s paint style and detail strip are sharp and catchy-looking. “I’m sure they thought it was a selling factor. There was always more than one reason why a farmer bought an engine.”

Love of working

Mike says he collects antique gasoline engines because he loves how they were designed, and he likes working on them. “I’m just intrigued by the design of early engines, and I love to do the machining and mechanical work on them, I love to make them run. I’m just fascinated by the fact that every company had their own idea for their engine, and they thought it was a better idea than those of other engine makers,” Mike says.

More than that, Mike says, is the friends they’ve made through the gas engine hobby. “We do a lot of visiting with people at the engine shows. We enjoy engines so much, and we like to share our passion.”


Quincy vs. Quincy

Quincy Engine Co. of Quincy, Pennsylvania, and Quincy Engine Works of Quincy, Illinois, are related in name only.

Quincy of Pennsylvania manufactured engines from about 1911 through 1917, when it was listed in the Farm Implement News Buyer’s Guide of 1917 as manufacturing gasoline and kerosene engines (stationary, semi-portable, portable and tractors), air compressors, rock drilling outfits, fruit spraying outfits, power pumps and pump jacks, as well as the Quincy tractor manufactured starting in 1912 for a couple of years.

Quincy of Illinois made a few engines, but very little is known about the company outside of several period advertisements and a few journal reports, including one in the Jan. 14, 1904, Iron Age, which said: “The Quincy engine works, Quincy Illinois, report an excellent business in their line for June. In addition to a dozen orders for Quincy Corliss engines the company have just secured a contract for a large compound vertical automatic engine for a direct connected electrical unit. These orders, in addition to a large contract for special machinery for the United States Steel Corporation, seem to demonstrate beyond a doubt that the now famous ‘Q’ for Quincy and ‘Q’ for quality seems to have struck a popular chord.”

Another reference in The Iron Trade Review in its April 20, 1905, issue mentioned a strike caused by the head of the union being charged with murder. According to the report, the charge was not pressed. A piece in the same magazine in 1910 was headlined “Otis Elevator Takes Over Quincy Engine Plant,” a takeover that apparently marked the end of Quincy Illinois engine production. – Bill Vossler

Published on Jul 10, 2017

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  1. 03-14-2008, 12:20 AM#1
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    Default gas engine vs dc motor horsepower.

    The basic question is how gasoline engine horsepower compares to DC motor horsepower?

    SWMBO does a fine job of mowing at the house. For her to continue this practice I must keep a small ztr mower (Dixon) running at all times. She is very hard on this poor little mower, particularly the engine. This has gone on for 6 or 8 years and the machine is about to the point of replacement. The engine gets a new rod this year and I think I can tune the transmission for another season but it has earned a well-deserved retirement. I would like to build an electric mower utilizing something similar to an electric wheel chair. It must have independent drive wheel motors to maintain zero turn capabilities. I wonder if I need to match the engine’s 11.5 hp or if less will work since no transmission will need to be utilized and other losses inherent to an engine will no longer be an issue.

    She is interested in just flipping a switch or two and doing the job. She does it all in less than an hour. Any ideas or experiences? Any way to use car starters? I am just beginning to do the research for this project so the sky is the limit! Sorry for not indicating OT in the header!
    Last edited by fatboy; 03-14-2008 at 12:22 AM. Reason: Sorry for not indicating OT in the header!

  2. 03-14-2008, 02:13 AM#2
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    Car starter motors are definitely not up to the task. There's just no room inside the housing to force through enough air to keep the armature cool.

    The biggest problem is batteries for the electrified mower. Where do you put them? They'll probably cost much more than a new engine?

    I think I'd see if it's possible to replace the engine with a Kawasaki, Kohler, or Honda of slightly higher power, and block the throttle travel to limit the max output. That would protect the drive train and increase engine longevity.

    Roger

  3. 03-14-2008, 02:13 AM#3
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    No way will you need to use 11.5 hp with a (pair of) DC motor(s). It's not just a question of reduced losses: it's a question of torque at standstill, and ability to continuously deliver sticker power continuously, under all conditions.

    I have no idea how to formally evaluate these factors for something like a mower, but my hunch would be you'd be fine with a couple of 3hp treadmill motors, suitably geared. If you bide your time you can get these new for US$29 on eBay, sometimes US made.
    Car starters are not rated for continuous operation, in fact they're completely unsuitable in every respect.

  4. 03-14-2008, 06:44 AM#4
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    Starters are intermittant duty also most DC motors for use off batteries are series wound though the hydraulic pump motor off a forklift might be coupound wound, series wound motors suffer from speed runaway when running with no load. A forklift hydraulic pump motor will have the power the ones that I have pulled have been 7.5 or 10hp though I did pull a 1.5 hp one which was for the power steering once. Batteries will be a real problem I have 8 trojan T105 golf cart batteries in my forklift and the hydraulic pump takes a bit out of them, I can drive it most of the day but the peak current draw is the problem, I am actually dropping another 8 batteries in just to get the current, the weight of 8 T105's is around 500Lb, fine for a forklift, I actually have another 500Lb of steel ballast but I may making mowing on soft ground a bit difficullt.

  5. 03-14-2008, 07:39 AM#5
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    To answer your initial question: a HP is a HP. A HP is a physical unit of mechanical power having international status and official recognition in legal affairs as well as engineering.

    People who read car magazines and listen to people speaking confidently out of ignorance seldom have their physics straight on the topic of gas engines, torque, and developed HP but gas HP and electric HP are equal in theory. In practice its common to select the next larger engine in a series than strict observance of physical ratings would dictate.

    Thus a 1 HP gas engine delivers 1 HP at full load under standard lab conditions. A 1 HP electric motor develops 1 HP at full load within its thermal ratings. Gas engines are typically de-rated a bit so they operate in a more economical range and last longer in service.

    Gas engine powered equipment marketed to consumers are frequently overrated by as much as two or three times creating confusion.

    A large automotive 12 volt lead acid battery is good for about 1 HP hour. I gallon of gasoline is good for about 6 HP hour in an engine of typical efficiency. Unless you want to load down a lawn mower with a half dozen batteries and use a golf cart motor for the mower blade and wheelchair drive motors for the wheels, incorporate controls, work out the ergonomics, etc you'd best stick with an off-the-shelf gas mower.

    There are many electric start gas riding mowers having zero turm capability on the market. They're a little pricy but unless you're a backyard engineer of surpreme ability and a master scrounger as well you'll be a couple of years of design, prototype, and optimizing - and the price of a store bought mower in materials - into the project before you see actual grass cut.

    What's so sacred about the mower you have that you can't just replace it? Looks like more data is needed.

  6. 03-14-2008, 07:59 AM#6
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    Default a horse is a horse unless of course...

    As for your initial question a HP is a HP a physical unit of mechanical power having international status and official recognition in legal affarir as well as engineering.
    unless said HP is the rating stamped on a shop-vac from Sears (or any of a number of small, usually universal motors as found in routers, drills, etc.). To be fair, they call it a "Peak Developed HP" and it's basically HP you'd get from the the locked rotor current, which can be huge - 50-60 amp - multiplied by the voltage (watts) converted to HP. It's meaningless, as this current would only be drawn for a millisecond or so, until said little motor begins to spin. (That 6.5 p.d.HP shop vac would require about a 65 amp service (@120VAC) if it was actually a 6.5 hp motor.)

    This may be some of the difference that creates confusion - a motor, DC or otherwise, develops its peak torque at 0 rpm and it's lowest torque at rated rpm. The IC engine develops no torque at 0 rpm and peak torque at a particular rpm.

    Your electric mower is quite a challenge - it will be an engineering feat if you can pull it together.

  7. 03-14-2008, 08:31 AM#7
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    Never thought I'd find myself taking issue with you, Mr Addy, but I'm with AeroncaChamp.

    Even among electric motors, all HP are not created equal, because HP doesn't tell the full story. A small model engineering lathe might be supplied ex factory with a 3/4 HP motor, if single phase, or 1/2 HP if 3 phase. And I, for one, would far sooner have the latter.

    When I was a kid we had a big old fashioned electric walk-behind reel mower. It had a 1/2 hp repulsion start induction run single phase motor (which I purloined to run the Myford lathe when it arrived from England on a ship, setting in train the long and winding path to .... well .... here, I guess !).

    The neighbour's considerably newer but similar mower had the usual 3.5hp Briggs and Stratton 4 stroke, which was of comparable adequacy to the task. (Mowing lawns, not running lathes !)

    I'll never forget seeing a ship being dragged (upwind) into the graving dock by a couple of D7-sized dozers when the usual two 15hp steam-supplied capstans went off-line. They really struggled, roaring, diesels flirting at the black smoke limit, clutches singing, and giving the hawsers a really hard time... whereas the steam capstans, with nowhere near one quarter of the nominal power, routinely walked away with the job even more nonchalantly than 15hp electric capstans would have.

    Lets face it, a steam engine at 75% cutoff delivers absolutely massive torque at zero rpm, and will (if you happen to be feeling perverse, or the brakes fail and the dock gates won't open) happily sit there all day holding a stationary load, which equates to exactly zero horsepower.
    Last edited by Troup; 03-14-2008 at 10:49 PM.

  8. 03-14-2008, 09:22 AM#8
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    A little while back watching a show on some electric cars people are building themselves. I remember one using a 25 or 30HP DC motor. Said it put out like 1200lbs of torque at any speed. You don't get that from any 25-30hp gas engine.

    As to how the conversion should be made, talking to some people who converted cars would likely be the best place. I can only imagine they have an internet forum somewhere on the net.
    It'll take quite a few batteries and $, and will be a fairly heavy mower if it is possible to stuff all the things onto it.

  9. 03-14-2008, 09:48 AM#9
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    Permanent magnet DC motors are almost constant torque devices. They put out the same (very close) torque at 1 rpm as they do at 2000 rpm.

    Scott

  10. 03-14-2008, 10:26 AM#10
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    Years ago, I set out to determine why Briggs and Stratton rated two of their engines at 3 HP and 3.5HP respectively. Same bore, stroke, etc. The only difference was the govenor spring. They were rated at different RPM. Got more money for the 3.5 HP, too. Real cute....Joe

  11. 03-14-2008, 10:34 AM#11
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    Most people happily mix up torque and HP.

    However......

    A small screaming 2800RPM IC engine will NOT act the same as a 400RPM slow-speed IC engine for the same nominal HP.

    The slow-speed will normally have a much higher "apparent" HP, and will "pull a larger load" in most cases.

    Yes the HP are the same, but it is "expressed" differently. The "screamer" has very little torque, the slow-speed engine has lots.

    Similarly home-shop people buy treadmill motors to put on machine tools. They then try to use the original pulleys from the 1725 or 1200 rpm motor, and slow the DC motor down to get lower speeds. Then they get mad when it won't drill a hole.

    Same deal.... the treadmill motor may be set up for 4000 rpm, and running it at 300 rpm just won't cut it. The HP is "there", but at very low torque due to the high speed. You must "gear down".

    So, no, the IC engine and the DC motor will NOT have the same apparent HP.

    For one thing, the IC engine has a fairly high speed at which torque "breaks down" while the DC motor has either INCREASING torque (series) or CONSTANT torque (PM or shunt) characteristics as speed reduces. That's the opposite of an IC engine, which first gets 'coggy" and finally quits as speed goes down under load.

  12. 03-14-2008, 10:40 AM#12
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    Forest's statement is correct.

    Horsepower is a measurement of the rate of doing work. The integral of power over time is energy.

    Horsepower ratings as distinguished from measured horsepower are two different items. For a horsepower rating to be meaningful the conditions of measurement must be defined. For example: a shop vac at locked rotor produces ZERO output power, however, input power may be very high. The consumer assumes the the power rating relates to the useful work the device can perform. This may not be true.

    Many people confuse power and torque (force). However, there is a relationship as expressed by the equation:
    Power = K*RPM*T
    where P is in horsepower, K=1/5252, RPM=revolutions/minute, and T=#-ft.

    The big problem with electric vehicles or lawn mowers is that in many cases an extension cord is not feasible. Thus, in one extreme you depend solely on a battery. The battery has much less energy storage per unit weight than gasoline. Also gasoline refueling is much quicker than battery charging.

    I like electric mowers, but I drag a cord around to use it. These are under powered for the job because they are 120 V units. A 220 V unit would be better than most walk behind gas powered mowers and lighter, but I have not seen a commerical unit. A higher power 120 V unit could be made, but that is a heavier cable and more than a 20 A circuit.

    .

  13. 03-14-2008, 01:14 PM#13
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    One horsepower is equivalent to 746 Watts.

    Jim

  14. 03-14-2008, 01:46 PM#14
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    Default GE electric lawn tractor

    Years ago, General electric produced an electric lawn tractor that worked very well. It used 6 Volt golf cart batteries. Had one motor for the drive and three separate motors for the deck blades. When looking at HP between electric motors and internal combustion engines, remember that electric motors have a near flat torque curve (they make nearly the same torque from zero RPMs and up) engines do not make peak torque until they reach a given higher RPM. Torque is the twisting force where as horsepower is the rate at the twisting force is produced, which requires higher rpms on an engine and no or low rpms on a motor.

  15. 03-14-2008, 02:02 PM#15
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    I didn't mean to imply that Forrest (or anyone) had it wrong - he's right of course. HP is well defined, and technical people the world over agree on the definition. It's the appliance marketeers (shop-vacs, routers, drills, saws) I have issue with.

    My point was that HP isn't the whole story and that when it comes to electric motors (especially) it is at best, mis-used, or at worst, used to mis-lead.

    Also, for a given application, HP may not tell the whole story. A spinning motor under no load draw its minimum current. It's only as you load it that it begins to slip and in doing so develops torque. Torque and current are directly related. That current times the voltage is watts - the power that's being delivered to the motor... 746 W = 1 HP. The torque is what gets you moving in a vehicle - motors provide their greatest torque when they are stopped (probably why electric/hybrid cars start you moving with the motor and then the engine starts and takes over). If you calculate HP based on the in-rush current (stopped rotor) you get the absurd "peak-developed HP" that Sears and other foist on us. A motor's real HP rating is what it can deliver, indefinitely, within a definite and limited temperature rise - heating due to resistive losses due to the current it draws.

    Gar - is your equation is new to me - is it valid for electric motors? My question comes from solving it for torque, and realizing that it's undefined at RPM = 0... or am I looking for the limit as RPM -> 0?

  16. 03-14-2008, 03:19 PM#16
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    "Years ago, General electric produced an electric lawn tractor that worked very well."

    Yup,
    neighbor had one, electrac ll, google it and you will find a small company
    building a copy of sorts.

    He had the deck out front with the 3 motor set-up and could trim under
    trees and such.

    with an electric motor running the blades (1 per blade, no belt)
    you can place the deck anywhere you want, even on the side
    to trim the shrubs.


    As far as battery time, he cut about 3 acres with it, don't remember
    if he could cut more.

    There was the original electrac of an orange and white coloring, which
    was 20 h.p., then the newer yellow and black trim electrac ll of smaller
    h.p., the electrac ll ran the wiring as a flexible circuit card, and had
    problems.
    The older orange and white models were wired with a wiring harness
    and seem to hold up well.

    An electric drive can give you very large torque if you:
    1. deliver the required current.
    2. keep it cool.

    The larger (20.h.p.) orange and white model, a friend had one,
    and related a story of pulling cars out of ditches (in the winter)
    with it. The batterys weight gave it traction, and the short
    duration torque was quite high.

    The effort to turn the steering wheel, in your application as a ztr,
    will now come from the batteries, so the load on the batteries
    will be higher than the original electrac with conventional steering.

    sounds do-able, will need some basic numbers as far as run time
    and batteries capacity.

    tnx
    Doug

  17. 03-14-2008, 03:24 PM#17
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    Are you guys all completely nuts?

    Here you are talking about gas engines, electric motors,
    hp, torque, efficiency, etc.

    You are missing the single most vital point to the man's
    post:

    HE IS GETTING HIS WIFE TO CUT THE LAWN.

    Hello. If he could market whatever he used for that,
    he could make an easy million bux in a week.



    Jim

  18. 03-14-2008, 04:14 PM#18
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    The general rule is: 1 HP hydraulic motor = 1 2/3 HP gasoline engine and 1 HP hydraulic motor = 2/3 HP electric motor. 2/3 hp electric motor= 1 2/3 HP gasoline engine or 1 HP electric = 2.5 HP Gasoline

  19. 03-14-2008, 05:23 PM#19
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    AeroncaChamp:

    Only when you divide by zero do you need to analyze what happens as you approach zero. In the standard equation I provided when RPM is zero or when torque is zero power is zero.

    When the units are known to be English and with some a priori information the equation is usually written as
    HP = T*RPM/5252 .

    This should be in many different text and reference books. But with what is happening in education today this might be not be present or presented in metric units. The K*RPM*T equation was to show a general form independent of units, except I used RPM instead of some Greek symbol for angular velocity, and HP instead of maybe P as a more general label for a power variable.

    .

  20. 03-14-2008, 08:56 PM#20
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    Troup, are you confusing load matching with HP and HP with other physical phenomena in an operating system while mixed them with unquantified anecdotes?

    The HP as a unit refers to 33,000 ft lb per minute. Period. That's mechanical power developed by a mover. All else is hype and application.

    You refer to a 1/2 HP R/I motor, a motor designed not only conservatively for reliable low voltage starting in sagging distribution systems but one having a large thermal sink and possibly a 50 percent service factor. Rated in modern terms it would be still a 1/2 HP motor if placed in coninuous duty like driving a pump or a fan but having a large momentary overload capacity. Thus it was successful in carrying through the thick patches of lawn and cooling out in between. Such a motor may not be terribly efficient but it will be nearly bullet-proof.

    The 3 1/2 HP Briggs may or may not have been honestly rated. They never are in the US. The big question is when the mowers were run side by side how did performance compare? In the thick patches that caused the R/I motor to bog slightly did the Briggs hit solidly running to max the governor? Fraud rages through the market place when it comes to HP ratings and often only comparative performance and maybe dyno testing will arrive at true figures.

    A 15 HP steam winch is so rated at a specific indicated power level, exhaust back pressure, and a specific steam consumption. When run without regard for economy a 15 HP reciprocating steam engine can develop over 6 times the rated torque and 100 HP at full ratings if the boiler can keep up with it. You can see this running in overload in a non condensing engine by the towering plume of exhaust steam representing a huge waste of energy. The proportions of the winch gearing etc are proportioned to suit the full capability of the connected engine.

    I'm not at all surprised that largish bulldozers were dragged around by a ship they were positioing; a ship which would ordinarily be easily handled by a steam winch anchored to the earth by a hundred tons of concrete poured around driven piles. "Massive torque" is certainly a powerful description but it's not a number on which engineering evaluations may be based. 30,000 tons moving ten feet per minute posesses enormous momentum. Quick! What force is necessary to decellerate the vessel to zero in 5 feet? Neglect everything but mass, vector, and force.

    Our drydocks were equipped with DC electric capstans with 4 point starters and field weakening on them. The motors were 20 to 50 HP @ 200 RPM at full field. Same deal as knee-action steam turbines: tremendous overload capaciy. There was an ammeter in the pit that red-lined max current Amps but was calibrated to double the FLA. The ship handlers regularly pegged this meter. They could break a synthetic hawser big as your calf or a 2" (dia) wire rope like a shoestring.

    One did break a head line thanks to the wind as I was watching. The broken rope smacked against a hunk of 1/4" diamond deck plate about 4 ft square. Folded it up like a taco shell and flung it against the electric shop across the street. The cowardly winch operator saw it coming and ducked into the pit. I never saw a fat man move so fast. That must be why rubberneckers are made to stand back when drydocking big ships.

    Then there is the the business of how HP ratings are arrived at. The 1/2 HP R/I motor may have a strictly nominal rating. The manufacturer knows that if the equipment was run to demand 1/2 HP the motor would never fail and last forever. Sears doesn't cavel at over-rating their consumer grade stuff 2, 3, sometimes 4times the actual usable developed power output. So the physical definition of HP used to rate an item of equipment holds water for the end user only as long as the maker complies with the rules. For shop vac marketers rank lies are ignored by user and consumer affairs divisions alike. Aircraft engines damn well better perform to specs or the maker will be in heap big trouble with the certification board and the people who use them.

    Speaking of: ICE developed HP is a variable quantity dependent on ambient air temperature and pressure altitude. A complete specification for an IC engine will include graphs indicating performance to be expected under varying conditions. A bush pilot who gets his Super Cub off handily when overloaded from a frozen lake in Alaska will likely run off the end of a 5000 ft runway on a hot humid summer day in Denver and pile up at the perimeter fence in a billow of smoke and the aroma of baked fool.

    And by the way, 746 Watts equals 1 HP ONLY when the motor is theoretically perfect and 100% efficient. Most motors have 10% to 30% losses; often more. AC motors have an additional complication: power factor. Don't blithely assume HP equivalents untill you've informed yourself of the effect of losses, load matching, and the other engineering factors that fund the branch of the anti-acid industy serving engineers.

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Sours: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/
1 hp Springfield Type A Gas Engine Full Scale Working Replica built by Emory Campbell

perfect 1 hp International Famous Ignitor Gasket Gas Engine Motor simple and generous design

perfect 1 hp International Famous Ignitor Gasket Gas Engine Motor simple and generous design

the first symptom of a cold is usually a sore throat. this is generally followed by sneezing or a blocked, sore or runny nose. usually, 1 in 3 people with a cold will get a cough and feel unwell.

colds are caused by viruses. antibiotics cannot treat viruses. instead, drink plenty of liquids to replace those lost from sweating and runny noses. get lots of rest and eat healthily. do not ask your gp for antibiotics for a cold.

you will usually feel worse during the first 2 to 3 days before gradually starting to improve. your symptoms will usually last about a week.

cold and flu symptoms are similar but flu tends to be more severe.

cold

  • appears gradually
  • affects mainly your nose and throat
  • makes you feel unwell but you're ok to carry on as normal - for example, go to work

flu

    perfect 1 hp International Famous Ignitor Gasket Gas Engine Motor simple and generous design
  • appears quickly within a few hours
  • affects more than just your nose and throat
  • makes you feel exhausted and too unwell to carry on as normal

cold symptoms can include:

  • blocked or runny nose
  • sore throat
  • headaches
  • muscle aches
  • coughs
  • sneezing
  • a raised temperature
  • pressure in your ears and face
  • loss of taste and smell

the symptoms are the same in adults and children. sometimes, symptoms last longer in children.

causes of colds

colds are caused by viruses. they can easily spread to other people. you're infectious until all your symptoms have gone. this usually takes about a week.

colds are spread by germs from coughs and sneezes which can live on hands and surfaces for 24 hours.

to reduce the risk of spreading a cold you should:

  • wash your hands often with warm water and soap
  • cough into your elbow to stop germs getting on to your hands and spreading to other people
  • use tissues to trap germs when you cough or sneeze
  • bin used tissues as quickly as possible

how to prevent catching a cold

the best ways to avoid catching a cold are:

  • washing your hands with warm water and soap, especially before eating
  • not sharing towels or household items, like cups, with someone who has a cold
  • not touching your eyes or nose. you can infect your body if you've come into contact with the virus.
  • staying fit and healthy
Sours: https://dermrxpharmacy.com/excessb23/cebcc264133.htm

Gas engine 1hp

United 1 HP

Author Photo

By Staff

1 / 2

Robert P. Maidl of 90 Girard Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873 recently restored this 1 HP United engine.

2 / 2

❮❯

90 Girard Avenue Somerset, New Jersey 08873

Here are a couple of photos of my recently restored 1? HP
United. Admittedly, the engine is a bit over restored with polished
flywheels and unpainted fasteners etc., for which I claim
‘hobbyist’s license,’ but it does closely resemble the
illustration in American Gas Engines Since 1871, page 521, lower
right corner.

There were traces of the original paint and striping, which were
duplicated as closely as possible. Probably the most difficult task
was fabricating a fuel tank to fit inside the sub-base. The
engine/skid is removable from the dolly.

Many of the missing parts were obtained through advertisers in
GEM, and it was a pleasure doing business with each of them. Having
been in the automotive restoration hobby for over 20 years, this
project was a pleasant and satisfying change of pace.

Published on Jul 1, 1992

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