Us form 1040 instructions

Us form 1040 instructions DEFAULT

1040 (2020)

 

Instructions


Note.This booklet does not contain any tax forms.

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1040 and 1040-SR Helpful Hints

Form 1040 and 1040-SR Helpful Hints

Form 1040 and 1040-SR Helpful Hints

For 2020, you will use Form 1040 or, if you were born before January 2, 1955, you have the option to use Form 1040-SR.

Many people will only need to file Form 1040 or 1040-SR and none of the numbered schedules, Schedules 1 through 3. However, if your return is more complicated (for example, you claim certain deductions or owe additional taxes), you will need to complete one or more of the numbered schedules. Below is a general guide to what schedule(s) you will need to file based on your circumstances. See the instructions for the schedules for more information.

If you e-file your return, you generally won’t notice much of a change and the software you use will generally determine what schedules you need.

IF YOU have additional income such as capital gains, unemployment compensation, prize or award money, gambling winnings; have any deductions to claim, such as student loan interest deduction, self-employment tax, educator expenses. THEN USE Schedule 1.

IF YOU owe AMT or need to make an excess advance premium tax credit repayment. THEN USE Schedule 2, Part I.

IF YOU owe other taxes, such as self-employment tax, household employment taxes, additional tax on IRAs or other qualified retirement plans and tax-favored accounts. THEN USE Schedule 2, Part II.

IF YOU can claim a nonrefundable credit other than the child tax credit or the credit for other dependents, such as the foreign tax credit, education credits, general business credit. THEN USE Schedule 3, Part I.

IF YOU can claim a refundable credit other than the earned income credit, American opportunity credit, or additional child tax credit, such as the net premium tax credit, health coverage tax credit, or qualified sick and family leave credits from Schedule H or Schedule SE. Have other payments, such as an amount paid with a request for an extension to file or excess social security tax withheld or have a deferral of tax (for certain Schedule H and Schedule SE filers). THEN USE Schedule 3, Part II.

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The Taxpayer Advocate Service Is Here To Help You

What is the Taxpayer Advocate Service?
The Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) is an independent organization within the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that helps taxpayers and protects taxpayer rights. TAS strives to ensure that every taxpayer is treated fairly and that you know and understand your rights under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights.

What can TAS do for you?
TAS can help you if your tax problem is causing a financial difficulty, you've tried and been unable to resolve your issue with the IRS, or you believe an IRS system, process, or procedure just isn't working as it should. And the service is free. If you qualify for TAS assistance, you will be assigned to one advocate who will work with you throughout the process and will do everything possible to resolve your issue. TAS can help you if:
  • Your problem is causing a financial difficulty for you, your family, or your business.

  • You face (or your business is facing) an immediate threat of adverse action.

  • You’ve tried to contact the IRS but no one has responded, or the IRS hasn’t responded by the date promised.



How can you reach TAS?
We have offices in every state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. To find your advocate’s number:
  • Go to TaxpayerAdvocate.IRS.gov/contact-us;

  • Download Publication 1546, Taxpayer Advocate Service - We Are Here to Help You, available at IRS.gov/Forms-Pubs. If you do not have internet access, you can call the IRS toll-free at 800-829-3676 and ask for a copy of Publication 1546;

  • Check your local directory; or

  • Call TAS toll-free at 877-777-4778.



How can you learn about your taxpayer rights?
The Taxpayer Bill of Rights describes ten basic rights that all taxpayers have when dealing with the IRS. The TAS Tax Toolkit at TaxpayerAdvocate.IRS.gov can help you understand what these rights mean to you and how they apply. These are your rights. Know them.

How else does the Taxpayer Advocate Service help taxpayers?
TAS works to resolve large-scale problems that affect many taxpayers. If you know of one of these broad issues, please report it to TAS at IRS.gov/SAMS. Be sure not to include any personal taxpayer information.
Low Income Taxpayer Clinics Help Taxpayers
Low Income Taxpayer Clinics (LITCs) are independent from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS). LITCs represent individuals whose income is below a certain level and who need to resolve tax problems with the IRS. LITCs can represent taxpayers in audits, appeals, and tax collection disputes before the IRS and in court. In addition, LITCs can provide information about taxpayer rights and responsibilities in different languages for individuals who speak English as a second language. Services are offered for free or a small fee. For more information or to find an LITC near you, see the LITC page at TaxpayerAdvocate.IRS.gov/LITCMap or IRS Publication 4134, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic List. This publication is available online at IRS.gov/Forms-Pubs or by calling the IRS toll-free at 800-829-3676.
Suggestions for Improving the IRS

Taxpayer Advocacy Panel
Taxpayers have an opportunity to provide direct feedback to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) through the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The TAP is a Federal Advisory Committee comprised of an independent panel of citizen volunteers who listen to taxpayers, identify taxpayers' systemic issues, and make suggestions for improving IRS customer service. Contact TAP at ImproveIRS.org.
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Affordable Care Act - What You Need To Know

Affordable Care Act — What You Need To Know

Requirement to reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit

The premium tax credit helps pay premiums for health insurance purchased from the Marketplace. Eligible individuals may have advance payments of the premium tax credit made on their behalf directly to the insurance company.

If you or a family member enrolled in health insurance through the Marketplace and advance payments of the premium tax credit were made to your insurance company to reduce your monthly premium payment, you must attach Form 8962 to your return to reconcile (compare) the advance payments with your premium tax credit for the year.

The Marketplace is required to send Form 1095-A by January 31, 2021, listing the advance payments and other information you need to complete Form 8962.

  1. You will need Form 1095-A from the Marketplace.

  2. Complete Form 8962 to claim the credit and to reconcile your advance credit payments.

  3. Include Form 8962 with your Form 1040, or Form 1040-SR, or Form 1040-NR. (Don’t include Form 1095-A.)

Health Coverage Reporting

If you or someone in your family was an employee in 2020, the employer may be required to send you a Form 1095-C. Part II of Form 1095-C shows whether your employer offered you health insurance coverage and, if so, information about the offer. You should receive Form 1095-C by early February 2021. This information may be relevant if you purchased health insurance coverage for 2020 through the Health Insurance Marketplace and wish to claim the premium tax credit on Schedule 3, line 8. However, you do not need to wait to receive this form to file your return. You may rely on other information received from your employer. If you don’t wish to claim the premium tax credit for 2020, you don’t need the information in Part II of Form 1095-C. For more information on who is eligible for the premium tax credit, see the Instructions for Form 8962.

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Introduction

For information about any additional changes to the 2020 tax law or any other developments affecting Form 1040 or 1040-SR or the instructions, go to IRS.gov/Form1040.

Postponed filing deadline.

The deadline to file your 2020 Form 1040 or 1040-SR and pay any tax due on your 2020 return is postponed until May 17, 2021. The extended deadline also applies to making contributions to individual retirement arrangements and health savings accounts. Estimated tax payment due dates are not changed, and the first estimated tax payment is due on April 15, 2021.

Unemployment compensation exclusion.

These instructions have been revised and are being rereleased to reflect the provision in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, excluding up to $10,200 of unemployment compensation paid in 2020. Up to $10,200 of unemployment compensation paid in 2020 is excluded from income if your modified adjusted gross income is less than $150,000. The $150,000 threshold applies to all filing statuses even if your filing status is married filing jointly. If you are filing a joint return, up to $10,200 of unemployment compensation paid to each spouse is excluded. See the instructions for Schedule 1, line 7, and the Unemployment Compensation Exclusion Worksheet, later, for more information.

When figuring the following deductions or exclusions from income, you need to figure your adjusted gross income unreduced by the amount of unemployment compensation exclusion.

  • Taxable social security benefits. See the Social Security Benefits Worksheet—Lines 6a and 6b, later.

  • IRA deduction. See the IRA Deduction Worksheet—Line 19, later.

  • Student loan interest deduction. See the Student Loan Interest Deduction Worksheet—Line 20, later.

  • Nontaxable amount of the value of Olympic or Paralympic medals and USOC prize money. See the instructions for Schedule 1, line 8, later.

  • Exclusion of interest from Series EE and I U.S. Savings Bonds issued after 1989. See Form 8815.

  • Exclusion of employer-provided adoption benefits. See Form 8939.

  • Tuition and fees deduction. See Form 8917.

  • Deduction of up to $25,000 for active participation in a passive rental real estate activity. See Form 8582.

Suspension of excess advanced premium tax credit (APTC) repayments.

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 suspended the repayment of excess APTC amounts for 2020.

If you have already filed your return, you don't need to take any action at this time; don't file an amended return. See IRS.gov/Form8962 for more information.

Economic impact payments—EIP 1 and EIP 2.

Any economic impact payments you received are not taxable for federal income tax purposes, but they reduce your recovery rebate credit.

Recovery rebate credit.

This credit is figured like last year's economic impact payment, except eligibility and the amount of the credit are based on your tax year 2020 information. See the instructions for line 30 and the Recovery Rebate Credit Worksheet to figure your credit amount.

Other taxpayer relief.

Recent legislation provided certain tax-related benefits, including the following.

  • Election to use your 2019 earned income to figure your 2020 earned income credit. See the instructions for line 27 for more information on this election.

  • Election to use your 2019 earned income to figure your 2020 additional child tax credit. See the instructions for line 28 and the Instructions for Schedule 8812 for more information on this election.

  • Educator expenses include amounts paid or incurred after March 12, 2020, for personal protective equipment, disinfectant, and other supplies used for the prevention of the spread of coronavirus. See the instructions for Schedule 1, line 10, later.

  • If you were impacted by certain federally declared disasters, special rules may apply to distributions from your IRA, profit-sharing plan, or retirement plan. See Pubs. 590-B and 575 for details.

Form 1040-NR revision.

Form 1040-NR has been revised to more closely follow the format of Forms 1040 and 1040-SR. Beginning in 2020, Form 1040-NR will use Schedules 1, 2, and 3.

Estimated tax payments now reported on line 26.

In 2019, estimated tax payments and any amount applied from your previous year’s return were reported on Schedule 3, line 8. In 2020, these payments will be reported on Form 1040 or 1040-SR, line 26.

Charitable contributions.

If you don't itemize your deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040), you may qualify to take a deduction for charitable contributions on line 10b. See the instructions for line 10b for more information and to find out how much of a deduction you can take.

Standard deduction amount increased.

For 2020, the standard deduction amount has been increased for all filers. The amounts are:

  • Single or Married filing separately—$12,400.

  • Married filing jointly or Qualifying widow(er)—$24,800.

  • Head of household—$18,650.

Virtual currency.

If, in 2020, you engaged in a transaction involving virtual currency, you will need to answer the question on page 1 of Form 1040 or 1040-SR. See Virtual Currency, later. In 2019, this question was on Schedule 1.

Deductible IRA contributions.

You no longer need to be younger than age 70½ to take a deduction for your contributions to an IRA. See the instructions for Schedule 1, line 19.

Coronavirus tax relief for certain individuals.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act permits certain individuals who file Schedule SE or Schedule H to defer the payment of 50% of the social security tax imposed for the period beginning on March 27, 2020, and ending December 31, 2020. For more information, see the instructions for Schedule SE or Schedule H. For information on reporting the deferral, see the instructions for Schedule 3, line 12e.

Credits for sick and family leave for certain self-employed individuals.

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) helps self-employed individuals affected by coronavirus by providing paid sick leave and paid family leave credits equivalent to those that employers are required to provide their employees for qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages paid during the period beginning April 1, 2020, and ending December 31, 2020. For more information, see the instructions for Form 7202 and Schedule 3, line 12b.

Form 1040-X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return.

The IRS has started to accept electronically filed Forms 1040-X. Currently, only tax year 2019 Forms 1040 and 1040-SR can be amended electronically. Additional improvements are planned for the future. You can still file a paper Form 1040-X and should follow the instructions for preparing and submitting the paper form. For more information, see IRS.gov/Form1040X.

Schedule LEP (Form 1040), Request for Change in Language Preference.

Schedule LEP is a new form that allows taxpayers to state a preference to receive written communications from the IRS in a language other than English. For more information, including what languages are available and how to file, see Schedule LEP.

Schedule D Tax Worksheet.

If you are filing Form 4952 and you have an amount on line 4e or 4g, you must use the Schedule D Tax Worksheet in the Instructions for Schedule D to figure your tax, even if you don't need to file Schedule D. See the instructions for line 16 later and the Instructions for Schedule D.

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Electronic Filing (e-file)

Free Software Options for Doing Your Taxes

Free Software Options for Doing Your Taxes

Why have 49 million Americans used Free File?

  • Security—The IRS uses the latest encryption technology to safeguard your information.

  • Flexible Payments—File early; pay by April 15, 2021, for most people.

  • Greater Accuracy—Fewer errors mean faster processing.

  • Quick Receipt—Get an acknowledgment that your return was received and accepted.

  • Go Green—Reduce the amount of paper used.

  • It’s Free—through Free File.

  • Faster Refunds—Join the eight in ten taxpayers who get their refunds faster by using direct deposit and e-file.

freefile

Do Your Taxes for Free

If your adjusted gross income was $72,000 or less in 2020, you can use free tax software to prepare and e-file your tax return. Earned more? Use Free File Fillable Forms.

Free File

This public-private partnership, between the IRS and tax software providers, makes approximately 15 brand name commercial software products and e-file available for free. Seventy percent of the nation’s taxpayers are eligible.

Just visit IRS.gov/FreeFile for details. Free File combines all the benefits of e-file and easy-to-use software at no cost. Guided questions will help ensure you get all the tax credits and deductions you are due. It’s fast, safe, and free.

You can review each provider’s criteria for free usage or use an online tool to find which software products match your situation. Some providers offer state tax return preparation for free.

Free File Fillable Forms

The IRS offers electronic versions of IRS paper form that can also be e-filed for free. Free File Fillable Forms is best for people experienced in preparing their own tax returns. There are no income limitations. Free File Fillable Forms does basic math calculations. It supports only federal tax forms.

Free Tax Help Available Nationwide

Volunteers are available in communities nationwide providing free tax assistance to low-to-moderate income (generally under $57,000 in adjusted gross income) and elderly taxpayers (age 60 and older). At selected sites, taxpayers can input and electronically file their own tax return with the assistance of an IRS-certified volunteer.

See How To Get Tax Help near the end of these instructions for additional information or visit IRS.gov (Keyword: VITA) for a VITA/TCE site near you!

IRS.gov is the gateway to all electronic services offered by the IRS, as well as the spot to download forms at IRS.gov/Forms.

Make your tax payments electronically—it’s easy

You can make electronic payments online, by phone, or from a mobile device. Paying electronically is safe and secure. The IRS uses the latest encryption technology and doesn't store the bank account number you use to submit your payment. When you use any of the IRS electronic payment options, it puts you in control of paying your tax bill and gives you peace of mind. You determine the payment date, and you will receive an immediate confirmation from the IRS. It's easy, secure, and much quicker than mailing in a check or money order. Go to IRS.gov/Payment to see all your electronic payment options.

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Introduction

These rules apply to all U.S. citizens, regardless of where they live, and resident aliens.

.This is an Image: efile.gifHave you tried IRS e-file? It's the fastest way to get your refund and it's free if you are eligible. Visit IRS.gov for details..

Use Chart A, B, or C to see if you must file a return. U.S. citizens who lived in or had income from a U.S. possession should see Pub. 570. Residents of Puerto Rico can use Tax Topic 901 to see if they must file.

.This is an Image: taxtip.gifEven if you do not otherwise have to file a return, you should file one to get a refund of any federal income tax withheld. You should also file if you are eligible for any of the following credits..

  • Earned income credit.

  • Additional child tax credit.

  • American opportunity credit.

  • Credit for federal tax on fuels.

  • Premium tax credit.

  • Health coverage tax credit.

  • Recovery rebate credit.

  • Credits for sick and family leave.

.

.This is an Image: taxtip.gifSee Pub. 501 for details. Also see Pub. 501 if you do not have to file but received a Form 1099-B (or substitute statement)..

Requirement to reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit.

If you, your spouse with whom you are filing a joint return, or a dependent was enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace for 2020 and advance payments of the premium tax credit were made for this coverage, you must file a 2020 return and attach Form 8962. You (or whoever enrolled you) should have received Form 1095-A from the Marketplace with information about your coverage and any advance payments.

You must attach Form 8962 even if someone else enrolled you, your spouse, or your dependent. If you are a dependent who is claimed on someone else's 2020 return, you do not have to attach Form 8962.

Exception for certain children under age 19 or full-time students.

If certain conditions apply, you can elect to include on your return the income of a child who was under age 19 at the end of 2020 or was a full-time student under age 24 at the end of 2020. To do so, use Form 8814. If you make this election, your child doesn't have to file a return. For details, use Tax Topic 553 or see Form 8814.

A child born on January 1, 1997, is considered to be age 24 at the end of 2020. Do not use Form 8814 for such a child.

Resident aliens.

These rules also apply if you were a resident alien. Also, you may qualify for certain tax treaty benefits. See Pub. 519 for details.

Nonresident aliens and dual-status aliens.

These rules also apply if you were a nonresident alien or a dual-status alien and both of the following apply.

  • You were married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien at the end of 2020.

  • You elected to be taxed as a resident alien.

See Pub. 519 for details.

.This is an Image: caution.gifSpecific rules apply to determine if you are a resident alien, nonresident alien, or dual-status alien. Most nonresident aliens and dual-status aliens have different filing requirements and may have to file Form 1040-NR. Pub. 519 discusses these requirements and other information to help aliens comply with U.S. tax law..

When and Where Should You File?

File Form 1040 or 1040-SR by April 15, 2021. If you file after this date, you may have to pay interest and penalties. See Interest and Penalties, later.

If you were serving in, or in support of, the U.S. Armed Forces in a designated combat zone or contingency operation, you may be able to file later. See Pub. 3 for details.

If you e-file your return, there is no need to mail it. However, if you choose to mail it instead, filing instructions and addresses are at the end of these instructions.

.This is an Image: taxtip.gifThe chart at the end of these instructions provides the current address for mailing your return. Use these addresses for Forms 1040 or 1040-SR filed in 2021. The address for returns filed after 2021 may be different. See IRS.gov/Form1040 for any updates..

What if You Can't File on Time?

You can get an automatic 6-month extension if, no later than the date your return is due, you file Form 4868. For details, see Form 4868. Instead of filing Form 4868, you can apply for an automatic extension by making an electronic payment by the due date of your return.

.This is an Image: caution.gifAn automatic 6-month extension to file doesn't extend the time to pay your tax. If you don’t pay your tax by the original due date of your return, you will owe interest on the unpaid tax and may owe penalties. See Form 4868..

If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, you may qualify for an automatic extension of time to file without filing Form 4868. You qualify if, on the due date of your return, you meet one of the following conditions.

  • You live outside the United States and Puerto Rico and your main place of business or post of duty is outside the United States and Puerto Rico.

  • You are in military or naval service on duty outside the United States and Puerto Rico.

This extension gives you an extra 2 months to file and pay the tax, but interest will be charged from the original due date of the return on any unpaid tax. You must include a statement showing that you meet the requirements. If you are still unable to file your return by the end of the 2-month period, you can get an additional 4 months if, no later than June 15, 2021, you file Form 4868. This 4-month extension of time to file doesn't extend the time to pay your tax. See Form 4868.

Private Delivery Services

If you choose to mail your return, you can use certain private delivery services designated by the IRS to meet the "timely mailing treated as timely filing/paying" rule for tax returns and payments. These private delivery services include only the following.

  • UPS Next Day Air Early A.M., UPS Next Day Air, UPS Next Day Air Saver, UPS 2nd Day Air, UPS 2nd Day Air A.M., UPS Worldwide Express Plus, and UPS Worldwide Express.

  • FedEx First Overnight, FedEx Priority Overnight, FedEx Standard Overnight, FedEx 2 Day, FedEx International Next Flight Out, FedEx International Priority, FedEx International First, and FedEx International Economy.

  • DHL Express 9:00, DHL Express 10:30, DHL Express 12:00, DHL Express Worldwide, DHL Express Envelope, DHL Import Express 10:30, DHL Import Express 12:00, and DHL Import Express Worldwide.

To check for any updates to the list of designated private delivery services, go to IRS.gov/PDS. For the IRS mailing address to use if you’re using a private delivery service, go to IRS.gov/PDSStreetAddresses.

The private delivery service can tell you how to get written proof of the mailing date.

Chart A—For Most People

IF your filing status is . . .AND at the end of 2020
you were* . . .
THEN file a return if your gross
income** was at least . . .
Singleunder 65
65 or older
$12,400
14,050
Married filing jointly***under 65 (both spouses)
65 or older (one spouse)
65 or older (both spouses)
$24,800
26,100
27,400
Married filing separatelyany age$5
Head of householdunder 65
65 or older
$18,650
20,300
Qualifying widow(er)under 65
65 or older
$24,800
26,100
*If you were born on January 1, 1956, you are considered to be age 65 at the end of 2020. (If your spouse died in 2020 or if you are preparing a return for someone who died in 2020, see Pub. 501.)
**Gross incomemeans all income you received in the form of money, goods, property, and services that isn't exempt from tax, including any income from sources outside the United States or from the sale of your main home (even if you can exclude part or all of it). Don’t include any social security benefits unless (a) you are married filing a separate return and you lived with your spouse at any time in 2020, or (b) one-half of your social security benefits plus your other gross income and any tax-exempt interest is more than $25,000 ($32,000 if married filing jointly). If (a) or (b) applies, see the instructions for lines 6a and 6b to figure the taxable part of social security benefits you must include in gross income. Gross income includes gains, but not losses, reported on Form 8949 or Schedule D. Gross income from a business means, for example, the amount on Schedule C, line 7, or Schedule F, line 9. But, in figuring gross income, don’t reduce your income by any losses, including any loss on Schedule C, line 7, or Schedule F, line 9.
***If you didn't live with your spouse at the end of 2020 (or on the date your spouse died) and your gross income was at least $5, you must file a return regardless of your age.

Chart B—For Children and Other Dependents (See Who Qualifies as Your Dependent, later.)

If your parent (or someone else) can claim you as a dependent, use this chart to see if you must file a return.
In this chart, unearned income includes taxable interest, ordinary dividends, and capital gain distributions. It also includes unemployment compensation, taxable social security benefits, pensions, annuities, and distributions of unearned income from a trust. Earned income includes salaries, wages, tips, professional fees, and taxable scholarship and fellowship grants. Gross income is the total of your unearned and earned income.
Single dependents. Were you either age 65 or older or blind?
This is an Image: box.gifNo. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
  • Your unearned income was over $1,100.

  • Your earned income was over $12,400.

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

  • $1,100, or

  • Your earned income (up to $12,050) plus $350.

This is an Image: box.gifYes. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
  • Your unearned income was over $2,750 ($4,400 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your earned income was over $14,050 ($15,700 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

  • $2,750 ($4,400 if 65 or older and blind), or

  • Your earned income (up to $12,050) plus $2,000 ($3,650 if 65 or older and blind).

Married dependents. Were you either age 65 or older or blind?
This is an Image: box.gifNo. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
  • Your unearned income was over $1,100.

  • Your earned income was over $12,400.

  • Your gross income was at least $5 and your spouse files a separate return and itemizes deductions.

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

  • $1,100, or

  • Your earned income (up to $12,050) plus $350.

This is an Image: box.gifYes. You must file a return if any of the following apply.
  • Your unearned income was over $2,400 ($3,700 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your earned income was over $13,700 ($15,000 if 65 or older and blind).

  • Your gross income was at least $5 and your spouse files a separate return and itemizes deductions.

  • Your gross income was more than the larger of—

  • $2,400 ($3,700 if 65 or older and blind), or

  • Your earned income (up to $12,050) plus $1,650 ($2,950 if 65 or older and blind).

Chart C—Other Situations When You Must File

You must file a return if any of the seven conditions below apply for 2020.
1.You owe any special taxes, including any of the following.
a.Alternative minimum tax.
b.Additional tax on a qualified plan, including an individual retirement arrangement (IRA), or other tax-favored account. But if you are filing a return only because you owe this tax, you can file Form 5329 by itself.
c.Household employment taxes. But if you are filing a return only because you owe this tax, you can file Schedule H by itself.
d.Social security and Medicare tax on tips you didn't report to your employer or on wages you received from an employer who didn't withhold these taxes.
e.Write-in taxes, including uncollected social security and Medicare or RRTA tax on tips you reported to your employer or on group-term life insurance and additional taxes on health savings accounts. See the instructions for Schedule 2, line 8.
f.Recapture taxes. See the instructions for line 16 and Schedule 2, lines 7b and 8.
2.You (or your spouse, if filing jointly) received health savings account, Archer MSA, or Medicare Advantage MSA distributions.
3.You had net earnings from self-employment of at least $400.
4.You had wages of $108.28 or more from a church or qualified church-controlled organization that is exempt from employer social security and Medicare taxes.
5.Advance payments of the premium tax credit were made for you, your spouse, or a dependent who enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace. You or whoever enrolled you should have received Form(s) 1095-A showing the amount of the advance payments.
6.
Sours: https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i1040gi

About Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return

Form 1040 is used by U.S. taxpayers to file an annual income tax return.


Current Revision

Below is a general guide to what Schedule(s) you will need to file. (See the instructions for Form 1040 for more information on the numbered schedules.) For Schedule A and the other lettered schedules, see Schedules for Form 1040.

IF YOU...THEN USE
Have additional income, such as unemployment compensation, prize or award money, gambling winnings. Have any deductions to claim, such as student loan interest deduction, self-employment tax, educator expenses.Schedule 1 PDF
Owe other taxes, such as self-employment tax, household employment taxes, additional tax on IRAs or other qualified retirement plans and tax-favored accounts, AMT, or need to make an excess advance premium tax credit repayment.Schedule 2 PDF
Can claim any credit that you didn't claim on Form 1040 or 1040-SR, such as the foreign tax credit, education credits, general business credit. Have other payments, such as an amount paid with a request for an extension to file or excess social security tax withheld.Schedule 3  PDF

Recent Developments

Using a Social Security Number (SSN) or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) When Filing Your Tax Return -- 25 JUNE-2021

Unemployment Exclusion Update for married taxpayers living in a community property state -- 24-MAY-2021

Tax Treatment of Unemployment Benefits

Form 1040, 1040-SR, or 1040-NR, line 3a, Qualified dividends -- 06-APR-2021

Filing Extension and Other Relief for Form 1040 Filers PDF

Face masks and other personal protective equipment to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are tax deductible

IRS Statement - American Rescue Plan Act of 2021

New Exclusion of up to $10,200 of Unemployment Compensation -- 24-MAR-2021

Health Insurance Special Enrollment Period Through May 15, 2021 -- 08-MAR-2021

Reporting the Credits for Qualified Sick and Family Leave Wages in Gross Income -- 01-MAR-2021

Correction to the Instructions for Forms 1040 and 1040-SR -- 08-FEB-2021

Reporting Excess Deductions on Termination of an Estate or Trust on Forms 1040, 1040-SR, and 1040-NR for Tax Year 2018 and Tax Year 2019 --10-JUL-2020

Limitation on business losses for certain taxpayers repealed for 2018, 2019, and 2020 --19-MAY-2020

Taxpayer Relief for Certain Tax-Related Deadlines Due To Coronavirus Pandemic -- 14-APR-2020

Micro-Captive Arrangements -- 23-MAR-2020

Reporting Related to IRC Section 965 on 2017 Returns –- 08-MAR-2018


Other Items You May Find Useful

Sours: https://www.irs.gov/forms-pubs/about-form-1040
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About Form 1040-SR, U.S. Tax Return for Seniors

Form 1040-SR is available as an optional alternative to using Form 1040 for taxpayers who are age 65 or older. Form 1040-SR uses the same schedules and instructions as Form 1040 does.


Current Revision

Below is a general guide to what Schedule(s) you will need to file. (See the instructions for Form 1040-SR for more information on the numbered schedules.) For Schedule A and the other lettered schedules, see Schedules for Form 1040 and 1040-SR.

IF YOU...THEN USE
Have additional income, such as unemployment compensation, prize or award money, gambling winnings. Have any deductions to claim, such as student loan interest deduction, self-employment tax, educator expenses.Schedule 1 PDF
Owe other taxes, such as self-employment tax, household employment taxes, additional tax on IRAs or other qualified retirement plans and tax-favored accounts, AMT, or need to make an excess advance premium tax credit repayment.Schedule 2 PDF
Can claim any credit that you didn't claim on Form 1040 or 1040-SR, such as the foreign tax credit, education credits, general business credit. Have other payments, such as an amount paid with a request for an extension to file or excess social security tax withheld.Schedule 3  PDF

Recent Developments

Using a Social Security Number (SSN) or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) When Filing Your Tax Return -- 25 JUNE-2021

Unemployment Exclusion Update for married taxpayers living in a community property state -- 24-MAY-2021

Form 1040, 1040-SR, or 1040-NR, line 3a, Qualified dividends -- 06-APR-2021

Filing Extension and Other Relief for Form 1040 Filers  PDF-- 29-MAR-2021

IRS Statement - American Rescue Plan Act of 2021

New Exclusion of up to $10,200 of Unemployment Compensation -- 24-MAR-2021

Reporting Excess Deductions on Termination of an Estate or Trust on Forms 1040, 1040-SR, and 1040-NR for Tax Year 2018 and Tax Year 2019 --10-JUL-2020

Limitation on business losses for certain taxpayers repealed for 2018, 2019, and 2020 --19-MAY-2020

Taxpayer Relief for Certain Tax-Related Deadlines Due To Coronavirus Pandemic -- 14-APR-2020

Reporting Related to IRC Section 965 on 2017 Returns -- 08-MAR-2018


Other Items You May Find Useful

Sours: https://www.irs.gov/forms-pubs/about-form-1040-sr
IRS Form 1040 Line-by-Line Instructions 2021: How to Prepare Your 1040 in 2021 👀📘🤔 🔶 TAXES S2•E52
Product NumberSorted AscendingHelp on Form NumberTitleNot sortedHelp on Form TitleRevision DateNot sortedHelp on Revision DatePosted DateNot sortedHelp on Posted DateForm 1040 U.S. Individual Income Tax Return 2020 12/10/2020 Inst 1040 Instructions for Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return 2020 04/14/2021 Form 1040 (PR) Federal Self-Employment Contribution Statement for Residents of Puerto Rico 2020 02/09/2021 Inst 1040 (PR) Instructions for Form 1040 (PR), Federal Self-Employment Contribution Statement for Residents of Puerto Rico 2020 07/06/2021 Form 1040 (PR) (Schedule H) Household Employment Tax (Puerto Rico Version) 2020 01/15/2021 Inst 1040 (PR) (Sch H-PR) Instrucciones para el Anexo H-PR (Formulario 1040-PR), Contribuciones sobre el Empleo de Empleados Domesticos 2020 02/19/2021 Form 1040 (Schedule 1) Additional Income and Adjustments to Income 2020 12/09/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule 1) (SP) Additional Income and Adjustments to Income (Spanish Version) 2020 12/17/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule 2) Schedule 2 (Form 1040), Additional Taxes 2020 12/10/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule 2) (SP) Additional Taxes (Spanish Version) 2020 12/17/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule 3) Additional Credits and Payments 2020 12/10/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule 3) (SP) Additional Credits and Payments (Spanish Version) 2020 12/17/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule 8812) Additional Child Tax Credit 2020 11/20/2020 Inst 1040 (Schedule 8812) Instructions for Schedule 8812, Additional Child Tax Credit 2020 01/13/2021 Form 1040 (Schedule 8812) (SP) Schedule 8812 (Form 1040 (SP)), Additional Child Tax Credit (Spanish version) 2020 12/07/2020 Inst 1040 (Schedule 8812) (SP) Instructions for Form 1040 Schedule 8812, Additional Tax Credit (Spanish Version) 2020 01/22/2021 Form 1040 (Schedule A) Itemized Deductions 2020 12/08/2020 Inst 1040 (Schedule A) Instructions for Schedule A (Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR), Itemized Deductions 2020 01/06/2021 Form 1040 (Schedule B) Interest and Ordinary Dividends 2020 11/04/2020 Inst 1040 (Schedule B) Instructions for Schedule B (Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR), Interest and Ordinary Dividends 2020 11/18/2020 Form 1040 (Schedule C) Profit or Loss from Business (Sole Proprietorship) 2020 11/13/2020 Inst 1040 (Schedule C) Instructions for Schedule C (Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR), Profit or Loss From Business (Sole Proprietorship) 2020 01/13/2021 Form 1040 (Schedule D) Capital Gains and Losses 2020 12/22/2020 Inst 1040 (Schedule D) Instructions for Schedule D (Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR), Capital Gains and Losses 2020 01/05/2021 Form 1040 (Schedule E) Supplemental Income and Loss 2020 11/16/2020
Sours: https://apps.irs.gov/app/picklist/list/formsInstructions.html?value=1040&criteria=formNumber&submitSearch=Find

1040 instructions form us

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IRS Form 1040 Line-by-Line Instructions 2021: How to Prepare Your 1040 in 2021 👀📘🤔 🔶 TAXES S2•E52

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