Strider folding knife

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Strider SnG Review

The original big three: Chris Reeve, Rick Hinderer, and Mick Strider. They’re all known for being the conglomerate that make the best production folders available today. Chris Reeve Knives (now run by his wife Ann, and son Tim) is the grandfather of folding knives, with the claim to fame for making classy pocket knives that work hard, for inventing the Reeve Integral Lock, and for being the first to make a serious, high end production folder. Rick Hinderer has a past peppered in firefighting and a EMT paramedic, he has first responders at the forefront of his high-tech, high quality designs.

Strider-SNG-700

And then there’s Mick Strider. The ultimate tactical, military driven knife maker. Despite some controversy that we won’t dwell on here, he has made a name for himself that parallels “hard use” down to his personal look. He and his shop make some of the most heavy duty fixed and folding blade knives around, and they look the part, too. The Strider SnG is their most popular EDC knife, and for good reason. It’s tough, looks the part, and is built with premium materials and superb build quality. Here’s a detailed look at the SnG, and how it holds up to it’s legacy.

Key Specs: Strider SnG

Al/Titanium
Frame Lock
Thumb Hole

The Blade

The SnG has had many generations come and go. The most current generation, with the blade stamped “M. Strider”, comes in a few common blade shapes, and many one-offs and customs. Today’s example of the SnG is a traditional drop point, made from CPM 3V steel. It’s a Monkey Edge exclusive variant, but the blade grind is the same as all the standard production model SnG’s. This blade is ground very thin near the edge, but retains a stock thickness of 0.19” in this “fatty” variant. The thicker blade on this model carries over to the other fatty models, but the standard SnG thickness is 0.16”. But, even with very thick blade stock, this knife is ground thinly enough at the edge, that most cutting and moderate slicing tasks are still enjoyable with great performance.

Strider-SNG-9

The SnG comes in “drops”, meaning the shop will make a batch of knives in a particular configuration, sell that batch off, and start on a different configuration. Their blades are commonly offered in drop point and tanto variants. Our test unit, utilizing the high flat grind with a swedge in the spine of the blade, and matte black oxide coated finish, looks absolutely sinister. And with 3V steel, there’s really nothing this blade can’t handle. The base of the blade has a large forward choil, for the index finger to comfortably sit within. Above the finger choil, is a sharpening choil. Then, finally, the edge of the blade begins, all for a disproportionate 2.75” of sharpened blade length.

For an 8” overall knife, that’s a very short amount of usable blade. We’ll discuss that particular design aspect of the knife later in the field test, but there’s no denying the lack of proportion between the size of the knife and the cutting edge length. The blade also features what appear to be thumb studs, but are actually blade stops for keeping the blade open in place of a traditional stop pin. With a large, oval cutout in the blade for deployment, this knife can be opened in multiple ways, whether you prefer to flick open your folders, or slowly roll them open. The spine of the blade has 4 pronounced jimping notches for traction when in a saber grip. Just beyond the jimping is the top swedge cut into the blade, to maximize piercing ability, while retaining a thickly ground tip for toughness and potential prying.

Strider-SNG-8

I must admit, this is one of my favorite blades I’ve ever used. It’s confidence inspiring, tough (even in the alternative commonly used steels, such as CPM-20CV and PSF-27), looks great, and has my personal favorite deployment method. It’s ground for cutting performance and, simultaneously, for piercing and prying. Even though it’s cutting edge is relatively short for the overall size of the knife, it’s a worthy sacrifice for having this blade. It’s also ground thinner at the heel of the blade than it is at the tip; just another point for a well thought out design.

Deployment / Lockup

The deployment of the SnG is by the way of a oval opening hole. The blade stops, which look like thumb studs, are positioned in a way when the knife is closed that they’re not usable for deploying the blade. And that’s all fine and dandy, because that was part of the design of the knife. Running on phosphor-bronze washers, the SnG blade kicks out from the handle with absolute smoothness and authority. Not all SnG’s utilize the thicker blade stock used on this variant, but all variants do use a heavy enough blade that in deployment, you’ll find a very authoritative slam open.

Strider-SNG-1

The opening hole is placed on the blade in such a way that allows the knife to be opened very naturally. Whether you prefer to flick the blade open or slowly roll it out, either method is natural and comfortable. These knives flick open well, too. I’m a bit of a detent snob when it comes to folders, and the SnG is tuned quite well. The blade can be shaken out from the handle by gravity, but only when very purposely manipulating it to do so. This is an attribute that’s very hard to get away from in folding knives. There aren’t really any knives I’ve handled, in manual configurations, that will retain the blade no matter how hard it’s shaken when closed. But I digress, the SnG does quite well here. Part of the reason for this ability to hold the blade closed tightly, is in the detent ball shape. The vast majority of folders available today use a round detent ball.

Some higher end knives in this price range, like all of Chris Reeve’s knives, use a ceramic detent ball for long life and smoothness. But the SnG utilizes a flattened steel detent ball. This shape gives the knife a very positive feel when it’s being opened or closed. But, I do question the life of that detent ball, since it’s made of steel rather than ceramic, and it also tends to cut a deeper groove in the blade over a long period of time. Unlocking the SnG, once it’s broken in, is smooth and just as natural as any other frame lock. But there’s an emphasis on “once it’s broken in”. I’ll explain.

Strider-SNG-2

The lock geometry on Strider knives is slightly unique when compared to most other frame locks. Typically, the blade tang is cut in such a way that it’s angled to accept the lock bar in it’s path, blocking the blade from closing. So far, we’re on track with the SnG here. But where it diverges from some other frame lock knives, is in the lock bar geometry. The lock bar is ground in a way that’s angled, with the side closer to the blade angled upward. This gives the lock interface between the lock bar and blade tang very little contact, especially when the knife is new. After some time in use, and opening and closing the knife hundreds of times, this lock bar will wear itself into the blade tang further, giving the lock interface a more complete lockup.

Sounds good, right? Well, not in my eyes. There are some notable issues with this theory of lock geometry. The first is lock stick. The SnG has been reported, from time to time, to lock open so tightly when it’s new, that another tool may be required to pry to the lock bar away from the blade. And the most rare and extreme cases of this have required users to send the knife, completely locked open, back to Strider Knives to get the knife functional again. So, on average, if you open the SnG with some flick, be sure to have some lock stick even in the best case scenario that the lock is in it’s normal broken-in state.

And now for my least favorite part of the lockup, lock rock and blade play. Lock rock refers to the blade moving from the back of the handle toward the direction of unlocking, while the blade is locked open. Blade play is when the blade will move side to side when the blade is locked open. The latter of these two issues is much more common on folders, as there needs to be some room for the blade to move from open to closed. So in that regard, we’ll call it “normal”. But you may ask, how is it that a knife with blade stops, and a titanium lock bar can have lock rock?  My only theory is that the materials used for the handle scale on the non-locking side (aluminum or G10) isn’t hard enough to endure repeated slams open, and a titanium lock face that isn’t carburized or hardened in any way wears down too quickly to ensure a solid lockup over the life of the knife.

Strider-SNG-3

To support this theory, I’ll use Strider Knives’ warranty repair for this particular issue. This problem is apparently common enough, that if you are to send your SnG in for repair because of lock rock, the company will install either larger blade stops to make up for lost material, or install sleeves over the existing blade stops for the same effect. After all the years that the company has been making this model, and it’s respective cousins, the SmF and PT (the larger and smaller variants, respectively), they haven’t found a way to correct this issue? I ask this of a big name company, with Military contracts, who charges around $425-450 for their folding knives. Why is this a recurring problem? I understand an issue from time to time, on any given consumable product. But comparing this knife to it’s most closely related alternatives (Chris Reeve Knives and Hinderer’s folders), this issue seems to be inevitable and repeatable with many examples of the SnG.

Features, Fit and Finish

The “fatty” variants of the SnG featrure a weight of 5.1 ounces, a 0.19” blade thickness, and an overall length of 8”. Most variants of the SnG are available with either an aluminum or G10 show side scale, and all variants come with a titanium lock side scale. The knife features a frame lock (AKA Reeve Integral Lock), blade stops to hold the blade in it’s locked open position, and a lock bar stabilizer to remove the risk of the lock bar being pressed too far away from the handle. This model from Strider also features many types of steels, from 20CV, 3V, PSF-27, S30V on older models, and 154CM. Also available in many different blade grinds, such as full flat, spear point, tanto, recurve tanto, and chisel, it’s hard to think of a configuration that hasn’t been made.

Strider-SNG-4

The SnG has a bit of an interesting pivot, in that it’s not quite proprietary, yet not quite common. I’ve been told that it’s the same assembly used in a bicycle chain ring bolt, and the tool I purchased for disassembling chain ring bolts did work on the SnG, albeit with a slight modification via my battery powered Dremel. And, in disassembling the pivot, the phosphor bronze washers are exposed. This is one large pivot assembly, sure to stand up to some hard use. The back side of the pivot uses an allen key, so no special tool required on that side of the knife. Once the torx body screws are removed, the simple construction is revealed, showcasing the fact that not many parts are needed to make a quality piece of hardware.

Also under the hood of the SnG is the detent ball, of course. It’s positioned in such a way that it holds the blade closed well, and allows a snappy feel to deployment. Part of the reason for the crisp feel in deployment is due to the detent ball being flat on it’s surface contacting the blade. I question the longevity of this method, as we’ve discussed before, but Strider’s warranty is apparently quite good, and just about anything on the knife can be repaired or replaced if necessary.

Strider-SNG-5

The fit and finish of the SnG is quite good. All edges on the blade are chamfered very well, and are smooth to the touch. The jimping is just aggressive enough to keep your thumb in place when you’re gripping it hard, but “soft” enough that you won’t notice it in lighter cutting. The fitment of the handle scales to one another isn’t absolutely perfect, like you’d find in any Chris Reeve knife, but I’d still consider it to be very good. The blade returned to center very easily upon reassembly of the knife, and I had no issues threading together every screw.

Field Test

Putting a knife to use that’s built like the SnG is fun. There’s not a lot of worry that anything will break or become an issue, and with so much hype surrounding the knife, it’s a pleasure to get the chance to try one in real use, rather than just holding it for a tabletop review.

So to start my simple testing that I do with many review knives, I like to cut up an apple. Thick blade stock like this is sure to split the apple slices with lots of cracking, but I wanted to give it a shot anyway. The thickness behind the edge of this blade is great; it’s very thin and bites into material easily, but retains a beefy stock thickness for overall toughness. But, with a flat primary grind, it’s not the perfect blade geometry for all tasks. Giving credit to Mick Strider’s design of the knife, it’s obvious this knife wasn’t meant to compete with the Spyderco Kapara or Spydiechef.

Strider-SNG-6

Breaking down 4 or 5 cardboard boxes in the garage gave some good feedback in hand. But, also some bad feedback when shaving down a 2×4, and cutting some heavy rope. The benefit of a blade’s thin cutting geometry aids in ergonomics, where hot spots are not perceived as severely since the force needed to make the cut is lessened. But, for my personal use, the ergos of the SnG were not perfect. The forward choil is in a place that asks for the index finger to wrap around it. It’s sized well for most hands, and feels good in a grip without making any cuts. But, when I began to put more and more pressure down on the blade for harder cuts, my pinky wasn’t as happy as before. It’s kind of ironic, how some of the biggest names in folding knives today have such a different idea of how the handle should be shaped.

Chris Reeve knives are flared at the butt of the handle to keep the knife in hand without rocking from tip to end, when making harder cuts. Hinderers are tapered down at the butt of the handle, so it’s more comfortable in a saber grip. And Striders are almost twice as wide at the butt of the handle than they are at the top. This theory of handle shape is good, in that the handle won’t rock from tip to base in heavy cutting since your pinky will be supported during use. But, the handle scales are about as blocky as a sock full of Legos. Contouring these handle scales, or at least chamfering the edges moderately, would really aid in keeping this knife’s handle from becoming a small brick in your hand.

Carrying the SnG is not for the feint of heart. It’s relatively heavy for it’s overall size, it carries fairly high in the pocket, and with that wide handle base it’ll remind you that you’re carrying it more often than you may appreciate. Some Cold Steel knives I’ve owned and carried have been much heavier and even more obtrusive in the pocket, but with the size of the SnG being that of a medium sized EDC knife, it seems to carry much bigger than it really is.

Alternatives

All these knives available at BladeHQ.

When looking for a heavy duty, hard use folder in the $450-550 range, there are only a few competitors that get all the glory. Of course, the Strider SMF and PT are respectively the larger and smaller brothers to the SnG, and if you’re looking to stay in the Strider folding knife family in a different size range, these are your only options.

chris-reeve-large-inkosi

But, if you’re willing to branch out to one of the other USA based legendary folding knife companies, the Chris Reeve Knives Large Inkosi is one very strong competitor. I’ll admit, Strider’s knives are a little less readily available that Hinderer’s or CRK’s. And the Inkosi has a grocery list of features that give it the credibility to stack up to an SnG. The washers found on the Inkosi are about twice the diameter of the SnG’s, giving the blade absolutely zero side to side play when locked open. Using the ceramic detent ball as both the closed position detent, and the locked open position lock interface, the 97 HRC ceramic ball lockup is one tough cookie. It’ll take repeated opening and closing for years, and not have any change in it’s lockup position. The Inkosi retails for $450, features S35VN steel, and has a weight of 5.1 ounces. S35VN has a reputation for good toughness, and decent edge retention when coming from the CRK family based plant, but is regarded as a downgrade from most of the Strider steel variants. The Inkosi also has the sheepsfoot (insingo) blade shape option, as well as the drop point or tanto. Handle scale inserts in the form of black, natural or red micarta are also alternatives to the standard bead blasted titanium handle scales.

Hinderer XM-18-700

And Rick Hinderer’s XM-18is the 3rd piece of the “big three” big name EDC high end user knives. The XM-18 has some strong arguments on it’s side for being the possible best value for this 3-way competition. Coming in at $425 for most common variants,  and using the Tri Way pivot system gives this competitor some gusto for which to defend itself. It’s cheaper than the other two options, has an optional phosphor bronze, Teflon or bearings (every knife comes with all three choices), and uses CPM-20CV or M390 blade steel. Deployment is also “choose your own adventure” here, as the XM-18 in it’s more common form has a flipper tab as well as blade stops. And the XM-18 can be deployed with the blade stops, unlike the SnG. This is one extremely customizable knife, with tons of factory and aftermarket parts and accessories, and tons of blade shapes to choose from, too. The only knife on this list of alternatives to also have a tip up or tip down carry is present on the XM-18 as well, if you delve in the madness that is tip down carry. This is a do-it-all knife, with a great warranty, nearly endless options and configurations, and a legacy that’s up to par with Strider and CRK.

Conclusion

When spending $425-500 on a folding knife, the choices get tough, and the criticism is heightened. The SnG obtained it’s legacy from a hardcore group of knife makers, who show up to the fight with a serious knife. It looks tough, and acts the part. It isn’t made to be a kitchen companion, or to have a sleek, slender appearance. It’s made to cut well in heavy utility use, and be a bad ass to it’s core. I think Strider Knives has done a good job in executing a knife with the theory of what it’s made to do. What it’s not, though, is a polished, plush, friendly looking pocket pal that’s going to be well received by the office crew at lunchtime. It looks like a weapon, acts like a tool, and has some muscle to spare. Just don’t expect it to be quiet at the dinner table. This is a knife made to be aggressive and tough, not to shimmer and shine as pocket jewelry.

  • Tough and stout, superb blade, many available variants, good for hard use.
  • Inconsistent lockup, polarizing looks and ergonomics, difficult to obtain with production bursts.

Strider SnG

Quality/Performance - 84%

The Strider SnG is a hard use, tough-as-nails high end folding knife which performs well but not without a few flaws.

Last updated on Apr 16th, 2021 by Matt Davidson

Sours: https://knifeinformer.com/strider-sng-review/

Strider SNG Folding Knife Review - Build Configurations

Founded by former military men, Strider Knives are a leading, All-American tactical knife brand build to last and out-perform all others in any environment. Their line of SNG knives have many variations to fit your needs.

SNG Variations & Configurations

All blades measure to be 3.5 inches long, 4.75 inches long when compacted in the folder, and a total of 8.1 inches long when open. Blades are made with a variety of steels, including S30V, 154CM, S35-VN stainless steel grades, and high carbon tool steels to hold the edge and improve strength over time. Each knife has an average weight between 4.3 to 4.5 ounces.

SNG Handles

Strider SNG handles are built to last and for maximum toughness. Combining strength with light-weight durability, the handles are made out of titanium on the lock side and G-10 on the other, held together with oversized Torx screws for a tight, strong fit. The g-10 handle slab is fully 3d machined to include the spacer section in one complete piece, providing an exceedingly strong construction with full-length spacer for greater endurance over time and through various terrains and operations.

Handle styles also vary, with standard (also called lego) flat handle with natural G-10 texture, a gunner grip or GG (3d machined with handgun grip texture), or concealed carry aptly named the CC (contoured handle, smooth texture) styles as options.

Overall, the handles are built to provide a strong frame-lock with high grip quality for the average sized hand, gloved or not. Most handles have filed thumb rests/jimping and dual thumb studs on the handle for gripping with both left or right hands, plus an oval hole. In addition, most models have a lanyard hole or clip for maximizing your carrying abilities.

Four colors, black G10, ranger green, and coyote tan, paired with stone-washed or black cerakote finishes on the titanium clip sides. KnifeArt.com has an exclusive arctic grey g-10 handle option.

Blade Grinds

Strider SNG knives come with hollow, flat, 3/4 hollow and tanto grinds. Hollow ground SNG knives will give you the sharpness needed to cut through many materials like butter, while the flat grind models will give consistent cuts through materials in greater depth. The tanto grind also gives you a strong tip for penetration.

Blade Finishes

You'll find great diversity when it comes to blade finishes for your SNG: from their trademark tiger stripe finish to stone-washed, black oxide, cerakote or even bead blasted finishes, the finish options make each knife unique for the owner, every time.

Strider rotates from SNG knife configuration to configuration based upon their capacity, which may leave a specific configuration out of stock for long periods of time. Hunting for an unusual configuration can be a futile effort.

Overall, the variations of the Strider SNG allow for a versatile, powerful, everyday knife for carrying. Starting at just $400 and same-day shipping, with exceptional colors and finishes, you'll find a Strider SNG for all your tactical needs.

(prices subject to change)

Sours: https://www.knifeart.com/sngreview.html
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  1. What are the specs for the AR/GB, SnG, SMF and PT?
  2. What are the screw sizes for the AR/GB, SMF, SnG and PT?
  3. What are the improvements in the AR/GB?
  4. What are the differences/improvements in the SnG Generations?
  5. What are the differences/improvements in the SMF Generations?
  6. What are the differences/improvements in the PT Generations?
  7. How do I tell the difference between a SnG and SMF?
  8. Why G10 on the SnG/SMF instead of all Ti?
  9. Why doesn't the thumbstud/bladestop touch the G10 on the SMF and SnG?
  10. Why are some of the thumbstuds/bladestops on the SnG/SMF different sizes when comparing the G10 to the Ti side?
  11. Is the upper swedge on custom folders sharpened?
  12. What is the cause for off center blades on some folders?
  13. Why is the pocket clip on the PT so big?
  14. Will the blade on the AR/GB, SMF, or SnG cut my lanyard when closed?
  15. How do I attach my pre-made lanyard on a AR/GB, SMF or SnG?
  16. How do I loosen the pocket clip on my SnG/SMF?
  17. How do I field strip a SMF / SnG / AR / GB?
  18. The thumbstuds on my AR/GB sometimes hurt my thumbs when opening, what can be done?
  19. What is the NM folder (sometimes referred to as the XL SnG)?
  20. What is the RC folder?

1. What are the specs for the AR/GB, SnG, SMF and PT?

 

 

AR/GB

SMF

SnG Gen I-III

SnG Gen IV-VI

PT

Overall Length

9.44"

9"

8.125"

8.125"

6.505"

Ti Slab Thickness

.100"

.150"

.125"

.150"

.117"

Blade Thickness

.187"

.187"

.165"

.165"

.120"

Overall Thickness

.66"

.53"

.4375"

.4625"

.3985"

Blade Length from Center Pivot

4.63"

4.4"

4.0"

4.0"

3.25"

Cutting Surface

3.5"

3.75"

2.9375"

2.9375"

2.25"

Weight

9.05oz

6.0oz

4.6oz

4.6oz

2.5oz

 

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2. What are the screw sizes for the AR/GB, SMF, SnG and PT?

AR/GB = 4-40 thread 0.250
SMF = 6-32 thread 0.430 long and a head 0.258 in diameter and 0.075 thick. Driver size is T-10 Torx.
SnG (Gen IV +) = 6-32 thread 0.375 long and a head 0.258 in diameter and 0.075 thick. Driver size is T-10 Torx.
SnG (Gen I - III) = 4-40 thread 0.355 long and a head 0.205 in diameter and 0.060 inches thick. The driver size is T-9 Torx
PT = 2-56 thread by 0.1875 on the body screws
Hinderer Lock Bar Stabilizer Screw = 2-56 thread by 0.250

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3. What are the improvements in the AR/GB?

Changes in the AR/GB over time include:

  1. Changed the grind from hollow ground to full bevel ground
  2. Hollow Ground AR/GB were numbered, full bevel ground AR/GB are not numbered.
  3. Changed from single thumbstud to duel thumbstuds
  4. Went to Non adhesive bearings
  5. Dropped the tip deeper into frame when closed
  6. Changed the bump stop from .125” to .152”
  7. Removed material from lower area of blade to facilitate rotation
  8. Upgraded detent ball size
  9. Upgraded belt clip and added ambi-carry option
  10. Radiused G10
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4. What are the differences/improvements in the SnG Generations?

Gen I SnG = Tanto/Droppoint, #’d, Tiger Striped Blade, Flamed Ti, Green/Black G10, Dimples

(Photos by MikeTrack on USN)

Gen II SnG = Tanto/Droppoint, #’d, Stonewashed Blade,

Stonewashed Ti, Black G10.
 

(photo by MikeTrack on USN)

Gen III SnG = Tanto/Droppoint, #’d, Black Blade,

Blackened Ti, Black G10
 

(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

Gen III SnG Pivot, Gen IV SnG Pivot

<(Photos by MikeTrack on USN)

 

Gen IV SnG Droppoint, Tiger Striped Blade,
Flamed Ti, Black G10,
introduction of the bull pivot
and thicker Ti frame.

Gen V SnG Lock Bar Scallop (top), Gen IV SnG Lock Bar (bottom)
(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

Gen V SnG = Tanto/Droppoint, Tiger Striped Blade, Flamed Ti,
Green G10 and/or Black G10, introduction of the Lock Bar Scallop and larger screws

(Gen V SnG Tantos have a unique grind – a flat grind instead of full bevel).

Gen V SnG Tanto with flat grind (foreground),

Gen VI SnG Tanto with full bevel grind (background)


(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)


 

 

Gen V SnG (top), Gen VI SnG with Hinderer Lock Bar Stabilizer (bottom)


(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

 

 

Gen VI Thumb Oval (left), Gen III Thumb Oval (right)


(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

 

 

Digicam Drop Point SnGs

Black, Coyote Brown and Ranger Green G10


(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

 

 

Ghost Digicam
Ranger Green G10

(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)


CC = Concealed Carry

Gen VI SnG
(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

SnG Lefty = Droppoint Gen VI SnG with Lockbar on the left side to allow for left hand pocket carry.

 

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5. What are the differences/improvements in the SMF Generations?

Civilian SMF = Droppoint, #'d 1 - 150, Tiger Striped Blade, Flamed Ti, Black G10.
Gen I SMF = Droppoint, Tiger Striped Blade, Flamed Ti, Black G10.
Gen II SMF = Droppoint, Tiger Striped or Digicam Blade, Flamed Ti, Black, Coyote Brown, or Ranger Green G10, introduction of the Lock Bar Scallop and the Hinder Lock Bar Stabilizer (LBS).
SMF R = Recurve, based on the Gen II SMF, Black G10, Coyote Brown G10 or Ranger Green G10, Lock Bar Scallop and LBS.
SMF T = Tanto, #'d 1 - 100, based on the Gen II SMF, Black G10 available only thru Blue Line Gear
SMF T SW = Tanto, based on the Gen II SMF, Stone Wash blade, Black G10 available only thru Blue Line Gear
SMF T Digi = Tanto, based on the Gen II SMF, Digi Cam blade, Black or Ranger Green G10 available only thru Blue Line Gear
NSN SMF = Droppoint, #'d 1-100, Based on the Gen II SMF, Ti engraved with NSN available only thru Strider Knives

Civilian Numbered SMF (top) Production Gen I SMF (bottom)
(Photo by HKSIG45)
SMF T
(Photo by Tendoncutter on USN)

SMF T SW
(Photo by Blue Line Gear)

SMF T Digi
(Photo by Blue Line Gear)

Civilian Numbered SMF (top) NSN SMF (bottom)
(Photo by HKSIG45)

 

 

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6. What are the differences/improvements in the PT Generations?

PT = Droppoint or Recurve, Beadblasted, Tiger Striped or Digicam blade / Ti, with Black, Ranger Green, or Coyote Brown G10

PT ORD from the 2005 Chicago Custom Knife Show = Recurve, Digicam, Black G10 and flamed Ti (only 10 available)

PT Bleadblasted Blade

(Photo by Ted Voorde on USN)

PT Recurve
(Photo by cqbdude on USN)

PT ORD from the 2005 Chicago Custom Knife Show
(Photo by rvin1911 on USN)

PT Stonewashed Digicam Blade
(Photo by Blue Line Gear)

PT Tiger Striped Blade
(Photo by MikeTrack on USN)

 

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7. How do I tell the difference between a SnG and SMF?

The SnG has 3 body screws the SMF has 4 body screws.

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8. Why G10 on the SnG/SMF instead of all Ti?

Per Mick Strider:  "The actual reason is that as much as you think it would ‘look’ cool. It’s a less quality knife. We use the G10 because it is rigid as hell. Ti is rather flexible by nature…it moves around quite a bit. The way we mill the G10 it is a solid piece of .390” thick material.

There are a lot of other reasons I could toss in there as well.

Its cold on your skin.
It is less ‘grip-able’."

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9. Why doesn't the thumbstud/bladestop touch the G10 on the SMF and SnG?


Per Mick Strider:  "It doesn't matter and is designed not to matter.

We would RATHER that it "Just misses" the G10.
We do this because it wears a lot quicker than the ti. If your lock is set to touch the g10....then it wears....your lock is less secure. If it always hits the ti, it's rock solid.

On a lot of knives, you my find a small spot where we took off a little g10. This was done to insure bump stop to ti integrity."

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10. Why are some of the thumbstuds/bladestops on the SnG/SMF different sizes when comparing the G10 to the Ti side?


Per Mick Strider:  "We make the them two ways.....

 

1. We make a cut on the G10 so that it sits further back than the Ti.

 

2. We make a bump stop that is larger on one side.

 

We do it two ways because i can't decide which way i like better......"

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11. Is the upper swedge on custom folders sharpened?

Per Mick Strider:  "Most of custom folders have a false edge...but its NEVER sharp."

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12. What is the cause for off center blades on some folders?

Per Mick Strider: “The way our pivot works is this:

Our folders pivot on an “open pivot”, a shaft made of hardened 416 stainless steel that is .390”. Our pivot is designed to slide through the G10/Ti and index into the Ti on the other side. The pivot is then held captive using a bolt that threads directly into the center of the pivot shaft. The smallest part in the pivot assembly is this bolt. Its diameter measures .303”.

 

The second strongest pivot I have seen uses a 6-32 screw to hold the pivot shaft. A 6-32 screw has a diameter of .134”.
The Blade pivots around the shaft and between two bronze bearings that are .020” thick each. We don’t use anything but Bronze bearings because these folders are made for very hard use, and we learned a long time ago that bearings made of lesser material don’t hold up well in surf zone or dessert environments. 

For our discussion, let’s use an AR as a test piece.

An AR has a pivot shaft that is .390” +0/-.001.
It has two bronze bearings that are .02”+/- .0002 thick.
Blade thickness is .190” +0/-.002
For those of you who don’t understand the measurements, +/- stands for plus or minus and represents the degree of variance we are willing to except in our parts. A measurement of .001 is one, one thousandth of an inch.

Now let’s do some math.

In order for a blade to pivot around a shaft that is .390”, the hole has to be at least .391”/.392”. Or it will not pivot, but act as a press fit part.
We ream our pivots to .3915” using a Mori Seiki NV5000 Vertical milling center. This machine is considered to be one of the most accurate made. Our holes have a variance of .3915”/.392, or one tenth of one thousandth of an inch. Give or take…
Our blade length on an AR from pivot center to tip is 4.685”

So……

We have a blade and pivot assembly. The pivot is .390 +0/-.01 let’s just say it is .389”…missed it by .001.
And our Blade has a hole that is .392”. I rounded these off because I hate math.

>Okay we missed on the pivot by .001 and on the blade hole by .0005.
That is a stack of .0015 of missed tolerance at the pivot.

BUT…..we also need to add the scales. In order for the pivot to slide through the scales (sides of the knife) it has to have some clearance. We like it to be tighter than the blade, but not a press fit. So we ream them with the same reamer .3915. They are made of Ti and G10, therefore they don’t cut as cleanly as the steel, they just come out a little more tight by nature.

Let’s add that now.

So we have a stack of:
Pivot .001
Blade hole .0005
Scale side one .001
Scale side two .001

Total .0035

Or three and five tenth of a thousandth total missed tolerance.
Now let's call that blade play.

If we have roughly .0035 of blade play at the pivot, and we compound that by the length of the blade, what will our total amount of blade play be at the tip?
Sure we can pull some of that out by tightening the pivot….but then your knife will be stiff……couldn’t have that….
So what you get is a blend of taking all of those parts and making the very best knife we can.
IF it turns out that the knife functions better when the blade is not perfectly centered……then we don’t make it perfectly centered. Centered doesn’t mean good. Good means good. If the person that gets the knife isn’t happy with how the blade centering looks, they can send it in and we’ll make them happy. Even if in the end, the knife looks better than it works.

Our goal is to make you guys happy.  BUT remember, there is an ass for every seat, some people like a loose pivot, some tight.
We’ll never make EVERYONE happy on the first try.”

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13. Why is the pocket clip on the PT so big?

The pocket clip on the PT acts as a Lock Bar Stabilizer (L.B.S.) by contacting the frame, and preventing overtravel of the lock.

The pocket clip on the PT is also the same size as the pocket clip on the SnG, SMF and AR/GB.

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14. Will the blade on the AR/GB, SMF, or SnG cut my lanyard when closed?

The lanyard should go through only one side of the knife (G10 or Ti), if you tie your lanyard through both holes there is the possibility that you will cut the lanyard.

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15. How do I attach my pre-made lanyard on a AR/GB, SMF or SnG?

Take a piece of floss/ fishing line/ single strand of paracord innards, and loop it through the big loop on your pre-made lanyard. Run the thin string through the lanyard hole on your AR/GB, SMF or SnG and pull the loop of your lanyard through. Pull the business end of your lanyard through the loop. It's easier than trying to poke the paracord through.

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16. How do I loosen the pocket clip on my SnG/SMF?

Per Mick Strider: "Remember that we make these things to STAY.
We didn’t design the SnG as a weapon......I don't care how FAST you can get to your folder...that's up to you. I care that you KEEP your folder.

We make the clip to hold very strong. It's easy to make it feel however you want it to....but we make it strong. If you want it to work more easily…I just push a flat screw driver under it and lift it a little….I know it's just right for me when I can see that the part of the clip that can touch the ti has enough room to slide a piece of notebook paper through without snagging."

If you aren't comfortable with bending the clip, place a #60 o-ring between the Ti slab and pocket clip.

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17. How do I field strip a SMF / SnG / AR / GB?

Disclaimer: Strider Knives is not in the business of putting your knife back together for you, therefore they recommend you do not field strip the knife. Field Strip your Strider folder at your own risk. If you can’t put it back together, then don’t field strip it.  

Field stripping a Strider folder before it’s had time to break in a bit is a waste of time.

The area where the washers contact the blade is the area that has to wear in. Bead blast blades need for that area to wear down/polish up before break in is complete. This polishing takes time, sometimes 300 to 1000 opening/closing cycles.

If you open/close it 1000 times and still feel the need to take the knife apart, send it in to Strider.

*******All information on field stripping and disassembling knives has been removed at the request of the Strider guys.

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18. The thumbstuds on my AR/GB sometimes hurt my thumbs when opening, what can be done?

Go to your local hardware store and in the pipes & washers seciton find a #60 o-ring. Place the o-rings on your thumbstuds.
Some think that the #60 o-ring is to big and prefer the #36 o-ring. 

Or just get tougher thumbs.

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19. What is the NM folder (sometimes referred to as the XL SnG)?

The NM folder is a Mick Strider Custom frame lock folder. The NM folder has been made in three different blade profiles (Nightmare Tanto, Recurve and Nightmare Spearpoint) and three different materials (S30V, Stellite 6k and Damascus). The G10 is hand grooved and some of the NM folders have Textured Ti.

The NM folder should not be confused with other Mick Strider Customs that have the Nightmare grind which are sometime referred to with the NM designation.

Size Comparision

NM Folder

SMF

SnG Gen I-III

SnG Gen IV-VI

Overall Length

9.94"

9"

8.125"

8.125"

Slab Thickness

.150"

.150"

.125"

.150"

Blade Thickness

.187"

.187"

.165"

.165"

Overall Thickness

.53"

.53"

.4375"

.4625"

Blade Length from Center Pivot

4.9"

4.4"

4.0"

4.0"

Cutting Surface

3.90"

3.75"

2.9375"

2.9375"

Weight

7.5oz

6.0oz

4.6oz

4.6oz

 

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20. What is the RC folder?

The RC is a frame lock folder with integral bolsters. The RC folder was introduced at Blade '05. There were two RCs at Blade '05, one was the XM Prototype, the other was a MSC Nightmare Recurve.   (has been discontinued 2009)

 

RC Folder

AR/GB

SMF

SnG Gen I-III

SnG Gen IV-VI

Overall Length

9.150"

9.44"

9"

8.125"

8.125"

Slab Thickness

.175"

.100"

.150"

.125"

.150"

Blade Thickness

.190"

.187"

.187"

.165"

.165"

Overall Thickness

.620"

.66"

.53"

.4375"

.4625"

Blade Length from Center Pivot

4.5"

4.63"

4.4"

4.0"

4.0"

Cutting Surface

3.8"

3.5"

3.75"

2.9375"

2.9375"

Weight

N/A

9.05oz

6.0oz

4.6oz

Size Comparision

 

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Sours: https://www.bluelinegear.com/
Strider Knives MSC SNG Nightmare Groot Folding Knife - Overview

Strider Knives

Strider Knives, Inc. is a custom and production knifemaking facility headed by Mick Strider based in San Marcos, California.

Materials and design[edit]

Strider Knives makes folding knives and fixed-blade knives, using metals such as ATS-34, CPM S30V steel, titanium, stellite, beryllium, damascus steel, and BG-42 for the blades. Currently Strider does runs in many premium super steels (CTS-204P, Z-Wear, CTS-40CP, CTS-B75P, CPM-154, CPM-S110V,CPM-3V).[1][2]

Strider fixed blade knives utilize Steel, Paracord or G-10 fiberglass for the handle material.

Strider uses a proprietary heat treatment originally developed by Paul Bos of Buck Knives.[2] This resulted in knives with blades of ATS-34 or BG-42 coming back from heat treat with a very dark colored blade which would then be bead blasted a flat grey color. After masking a blade before beadblasting, Mick Strider found it resulted in a striping or camouflage effect and it has become a part of the design.[3][4] As the newest steel Strider uses, CPM S30V does not darken after heat treating, a black oxide coating is applied beforehand.[3]

Strider folding knives[edit]

Strider SnG folding knife

After eight years of making fixed blade knives, Strider turned to making folding knives.[4] Strider's goal was to produce a folding knife that was as strong as a fixed blade.[4] To work toward this goal, Strider relied on the use of G10 Fiberglass handles, titanium liners thicker than what was in current use throughout the cutlery industry and an oversized pivot screw 0.19" in diameter.[4] The end results were two linerlocks known as the AR and GB models. Strider makes titanium handled framelock folding knives.[4] These models utilize the handle itself as the locking mechanism and are named the SMF, SnG, PT, and RC models.[4]

Military models[edit]

Strider's first project as a company was to supply Naval Special Warfare Group 1 with WB and BG models in 1994.[5][6] Strider Knives currently makes several models specifically for units of the US Military in the Global War on Terror,[7][8] each with its own NSN.[4]NATO Stock Numbers are: Strider SMF (officially - Knife, Folding, Special Mission) 1095-01-531-5015, Strider DB-L (officially - Knife, Fixed, Camo) 1095-01-531-5023, the JB1 (officially - Shroud Knife) 1670-09-000-3920, and the Probe Knife 1095-01-503-7231, built for landmine detection.

Strider Knives has designed a new bayonet it hopes to market to the US military. The blade is CPM S30V and it features a tang extending all the way to the latch plate for increased strength. Strider designed the bayonet for Zero Tolerance Knives, which will release it as the ZT Bayonet D9.[9]

Strider Knives has manufactured modern versions of classic military designs such as the V-42 Stiletto, the Marine Raider Stiletto, the SOG Knife, the USMC Fighting Utility Knife, and the Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife. These versions have the same profile as the originals, but incorporate modern steel and materials in their designs. The SOG Knife, Marine Raider Stiletto, and V-42 Stiletto have been used to raise funds for Veteran's Groups associated with those units.[4]

Collaborations[edit]

Strider Knives has collaborated with the following companies:

References[edit]

  1. ^Covert, Pat."Strider Knives Are Hard Corps", American Handgunner, March–April 2000
  2. ^ abGardner, James."Duel of the Titans: two exceptional folders exemplify state-of-the-art",Guns Magazine, June 2005
  3. ^ abKertzman,Joe."Earn Your Steel Stripes", Blade Magazine, March, 2006
  4. ^ abcdefghiCovert, Pat."Evolving edges: Strider Knives get Better and Badder!",American Handgunner, January–February 2005
  5. ^Bolke,Darryl. "Strider Knives!", American Handgunner Magazine, 2002 Annual
  6. ^Dick, Stephen (1995). "Blades of the Combat Swimmers". Tactical Knives. 1 (2): 68–73.
  7. ^Ayoob, Massad."One night in the War on Terror", American Handgunner Magazine, Nov-Dec, 2005
  8. ^Ewing, Dexter (2003). "Keep Your Eyes on the Strider Guys". Blade Magazine.
  9. ^Cox, Matthew (16 January 2009). "Shot 09 - Wicked Bayonet". Army Times. Army Times. Retrieved 7 February 2009.
  10. ^Markel, Paul. "Practical Tacticals: Buck's Strider Folders",Tactical Knives Magazine,May 2006
  11. ^Ewing, Dexter, "Knives and Lights", Blade Magazine, March 2004
  12. ^"Surefire/Strider - New Products",Guns Magazine, January 2003
  13. ^Cascio, Pat."Kershaw's Latest Tactical Folders",Knives Illustrated, February 2007
  14. ^Shackleford, Steve (2009). "New Knives for 2009". Blade's Complete Guide to Knives. Blade. 33 (3): 90.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strider_Knives

Knife strider folding

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Unboxing A MONSTER Strider Folding Knife!

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