Sfm rendering

Sfm rendering DEFAULT
Source Filmmaker – High Quality Rendering 1 - steamlists.com

It’s ridiculous how little guides there are that advertise a tutorial high quality rendering that also mention Depth of Field Quality. So, here I am.

In this guide I’ll teach you how to change the Depth of Field sample count and Depth of Field Quality.

 

Before

This tutorial will be very straightforward and I’ll just get to the point. The default SFM settings are quite bad.

I’ll be using this render I made in 15 minutes as an example:
Source Filmmaker - High Quality Rendering

This is actually quite a bad example, however the main problem here is quite obvious, the Depth of field doesn’t look as it should. The Depth of Field is somehow chopped-up and sharp looking rather than looking suitably blurry and smooth. The low Depth of Field quality is also responsible for the underside of the baseball being grainy. This is because Depth of Field quality affects much more than just Depth of Field. It also affects shadow filtering, shadow radius, volumetric lights, and Ambient Occlusion.

Step 1: Increasing the Sample Count

Right click the Viewport and select “Render Settings”
Source Filmmaker - High Quality Rendering

Change the “# Samples” to any value above 256. I recommend the full 1024.

After changing that value, click ok and select the clip editor in the timeline.
Source Filmmaker - High Quality Rendering

With the clip editor selected, wait for 5-10 seconds and the image should already start looking significantly better.

Step 2: Increasing the “Quality”

For this step you need to have your camera in the Element Viewer. To do this right click on the camera animation set and select “Show in Element Viewer > Camera”.

When you select the element viewer tab, all the settings on your camera should now be listed.Source Filmmaker - High Quality Rendering

Change the highlighted setting to something above 10. I personally have it set to 15. This has the potential of significantly increasing render times, so if you don’t think your computer is fast enough, stick to 12 or even something like 3.

After and Conclusion

Source Filmmaker - High Quality Rendering - After and Conclusion
Congrats. Your poster is now only handicapped by your own skill and creativity.

Written by Stjames221

This is all about Source Filmmaker – High Quality Rendering; I hope you enjoy reading the Guide! If you feel like we should add more information or we forget/mistake, please let us know via commenting below, and thanks! See you soon!


Sours: https://steamlists.com/source-filmmaker-high-quality-rendering/

Steak's Docs

DISCLAIMER

Source engine is over a decade old and many things on here may break things for you, but it is advised to use them. I’m not responsible for any breakages or ruined project files. Use this at your own risk.

Progressive Refinement Settings

This is one of the most important parts people almost always neglect, yet its one of the most important things for your animation/poster quality. By default, SFM by default uses “Camera settings”, which has all of the sample sizes set to the absolute minimum. DoF and MB sample size affects the AO quality volumetric lighting, and any radius lighting. Always push these settings up to the absolute max! Yes it will greatly increase the rendering times, but quality art requires that specific spit & polish. It only costs you time and is not something like V-Ray where a single frame is 12+ hours.

Rendering Image Sequence instead of a Poster

This one is a double edged sword. Rendering as a Poster has a benefit of being able to render at any custom resolution you desire, particle systems will render exactly at the time of the playhead and posters don’t have issues with the DoF plane not actually being where the final image focuses on. Now here’s WHY you should render an image as an image sequence. Ambient Occlusion ends up blocky on high resolution images when rendered as Poster, Poster renders do not render bloom and because Image Sequence doesn’t use tile rendering, render times will be faster. It is generally suggested to render your image as an Image Sequence.

32bpc workflow for post-processing of images

If you do not plan on doing any kind of post processing of your images, you can skip this one. By default, all of SFM’s renders are utilizing only 8 bits per channel, which doesn’t contain much color information. If you utilize 32 bits per channel render, you’ll get a ton more of color information. Its like 32bpc was RAW and 8bpc was regular JPEG. To use this, render your image sequence in the PFM format. Do NOT tick the “Write PFM depth file”. You can open the PFM file in Photoshop natively without any plugins for any post-processing.

The “highest possible quality” rendering setup

DO NOT use this for editing of your scene and DO NOT SAVE YOUR SCENE WITH THESE LAUNCH OPTIONS! YOU’LL BREAK THE FILE! Create a desktop shortcut of the sfm.exe and DO NOT add this into your launch options in Steam. Use this for RENDERING ONLY!

If you are having issues putting everything into the shortcut where Windows cuts off parts of the commands (most likely due of your Steam library being under Program Files), you can put the commands in a batch script to execute them.

If you don’t know how, I have made a quick bat script for people to use which includes a warning about the settings breaking project files.

Breakdown of the launch flags

& Launches SFM without Steam and Perforce P4V integration. Doesn’t make SFM lockup when Steam Crashes.
Sets the entity limit for map/game entities. Lower to 4096 if you encounter problems
Changes SFM’s render resolution to 4K maximum (720p is default)
Raises the shadow map resolution to the maximum power of two value
Raises the size of RTcamera monitor textures. Default is 256
Disables the Potentially Visible Set system of Occlusion Culling. If you’re having any kind of map visibility issue, this might fix it. Disable if you get any issues.
Size of water reflection textures. The default is 1024.
Adjusts the resolution of environment maps that are used for reflective surfaces.
Forces 16x passes of forces anisotropic filtering. SFM uses only one pass by default.
Forces water to reflect the world
Forces water to reflect all entities
Sets the resolution of water distortion
Prevents Engine Hunk Overflow crash. Required for num_edicts set to higher than 4096 and maps with lightmap errors
It SHOULD disable flex decay on models. Should fix problem where custom model flexes keep resetting on custom models

Sours: https://thunderysteak.github.io/sfm-best-quality
  1. Yoosung day 7
  2. Usc cheerleader outfit
  3. Vw fire pit
  4. Among the people questline
  5. Pictures of amen
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Hello there human! I'm sure you looked at all the great SFM posters and asked yourself - "How do I make such great stuff like these?". Well, you won't find an answer here, but I'll show you some mildly useful stuff that you can use in your posters.
So you started the program and after a long time you loaded a map! Congratulations, your mouse clicking skills really paid off! First thing you'll probably notice is hella low FPS when moving around! Amazing isn't it? Well, that's the first problem that we're going to (probably) fix.

Right click your viewport, and go to render settings.
From there, uncheck Ambient Occlussion - you won't need that for now


This should really incrase your FPS. But you can do one more thing to make it even smoother! (or not, works for me)



Look at the bottom part of your SFM window, a timeline, amazing thing, isn't it?
Now, drag the yellow framed thingy from right to left, and leave just few frames, like that

And these simple tasks should really boost your FPS in SFM!
2. Actually making something (posing)
So you have your SFM running smooth like uhh butter, you big brained man, good job on that!

Now let's make a simple poster, and I'll try to explain *stuff* along the way.

Now, pick a good looking map,I'll use Hydro, because you can't deny that this map is really pretty.

Move around the map, and find a good looking spot where you want your character, leave your camera there and switch to Work Camera.

this looks good enough

Now spawn yourself a nice model (remember to pick the ones from tf_movies, they're much higher quality than the ones in tf folder), I picked Scout, and let's get to posing.

When moving the model around, you can press SHIFT so the model will stick to the ground perfectly.



To make the expressions look more realistic, make use of that L and R sliders right above the face flexes sliders. It will make the expressions more prominent on the side you've choose.








Try to pose your character naturally, use references you can find online, move the spine and pelvis.
2. Actually making something (lighting)
Yesss let's get to the best part, lighting, first off, make your character dark. How? Well, use my another guide https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1415482848

From now on save often (CTRL + S) because SFM loves crashing.


This is where the fun begins...

Spawn a light and drag it onto the viewport, so you will control it just like you control the camera.




Usually the best place for keylight is from the top, if a map have a sun, try to position the light in similiar position where the sun is, I did a dumb move and the sun is behind the Scout, so I'll ignore the realism part, and place the keylight in that place:


Since we want good-looking light, lower the intensity to make it more natural and make the shadows sharper (to make it more natural). You can adjust the sharpness with ShadowFilterSize and darkness with ShadowAtten. Remember to add little bit of radius to the light, so it will blur out the pixelization.

Optimal settings that i use most of the time

One thing you should remember - NEVER use pure white lights. Play around with color till you get some natural looking one.


And now you got yourself a very nice looking keylight!


Now you want to get rid of the pitch black shadows. To do it, spawn a light like you did before, except now right click on it and click Disable Shadows, we don't need them for this. We'll also simulate bounce light here, since SFM runs on a old engine and doesnt have such things.
Place your in a way that it will light up your character from the bottom, like that:


Radius scatters the light around, the more you move the slider to the right, the more it will be scattered. We want that here, because it can create a smooth light. Tinker around with intensity, should be really dim. These are my settings, you can use them if you want.


Look at the ground on which your character is standing and color the light in similiar color, you can add bit of sun color too.




Right click on the light and click Copy animation set, then paste it, and position the light on the other side:


And from behind:

For this one you can turn up your radius or lower the intensity

First part of our bounce lights is done!



Take a gaze at the sky, blue and beautiful, and we're going to base on it our second part of fill lights.



Use the same settings as you used for the ground fill lights, if it doesnt look good tweak them. Place them in similiar position like the previous one, except you know, on top. Remember to give them a blue hue too!


And the fill lights are done!


Rim lights help your character stand out more, and you want that, right?
This one is really simple, spawn yourself a light, adjust the color and intensity, and place it behind the character, like that:


You can mess around as much as you want, as you can see, I added a second, blue one on his right side.

If you want your rim lights smoother, use radius.

And that's it for the lighting!
This one actually should be first but im too lazy to edit it now

To get to the camera settings, click on the + and select create animation set for existing blablabla and select the camera

Switch back to your camera (Bottom right corner, click Work Camera) and let's get to tweaking it.
First off, lower the FOV, you don't want your character to be disorted.


Also move the bloomScale to the left, disable it completely, never use SFM bloom.

If your character doesnt fit in the shot due to this, just move the camera back. Remember, you need to have it selected to move it around from now.


This one is very simple, move around focalDistance till it will clip with your character and incrase the aperture. Aperture makes the background more blurry.


And that's all really
4. Rendering quality and rendering stuff
We're almost at the end, congratulations, you almost survived the most boring guide ever!

Remember the render settings from the start? Go there, and enable the Ambient Occlusion now, and turn up the Depth Of Field samples, since nothing is moving in our poster, disable Motion Blur too. The more you turn up the samples, the longer the rendering will take.

These are the minimal optimal setting that, but 512 samples is more recommended


Ambient Occlusion, aka "why the hell my poster looks grainy"
If you turned up your Depth of Field samples, you got rid of grainy shadows problem, congratulations!

Anyways, Ambient Occlusion is a shading and rendering technique used to calculate how exposed each point in a scene is to ambient lighting. (thanks wikipedia)
To put it simple - if something is close to something, it gets darker in that part that is close, you know what, i have no idea what AO is exactly.

You have three settings in SFM to adjust it properly. You can find them in camera
SSAObias - controls how much the model needs to be occluded to be shaded.
SSAOstrength - controls how strong the shading will be on the model.
SSAOradius - scatters the shading around.

There's no one and correct AO settings, but this is the one I used for this poster. You can adjust it however you want, just remember to incrase your SSAObias, because if it will be low, it will make your characters kinda polygonal-looking.


Here's a really cool thing:
Right click on your camera > show in Element Viewer > Camera
From here click on the black bar next to SSAOTint and you can color your AO!


I picked kinda brown-orange, so it will fit the colors of the poster.



Now your poster is ready to render!


Click on File in top left, select export and then Poster. I recommend rendering in 4K, so your poster will look clean and sharp, and that's exactly what we want, right?


Select the format (TGA is the best quality, but you'll have to save it as png later in some photo editing program), click export and prepare for waiting. It all depends how good your PC is. Change the path too, so you wont have to search the whole SFM folder to find it.
And that's it! You made yourself a (probably) decent poster!




Now go into your favourite photo editing program and edit it to your tastes.









i refuse to edit this guide to fix mistakes, that would require effort and i hate effort
Check better guides for real help, like this or that.
Close
Sours: https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1435850944
[SFM] Rendering
Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering 1 - steamsplay.com

If you know how to change the DOF sample count and DOF quality setting, go elsewhere. And yes there is a difference between the two. It’s ridiculous how little guides there are that advertise a tutorial for high quality rendering that also mention Depth of Field Quality. So, here I am.

In this guide I’ll teach you how to change the Depth of Field sample count and Depth of Field Quality.

 

Before

This tutorial will be very straightforward and I’ll just get to the point. The default SFM settings are quite bad.

I’ll be using this render I made in 15 minutes as an example:
Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering

This is actually quite a bad example, however the main problem here is quite obvious; the Depth of field doesn’t look as it should. The Depth of Field is somehow chopped-up and sharp looking rather than looking suitably blurry and smooth. The low Depth of Field fidelity is also responsible for the underside of the baseball being grainy. This is because Depth of Field fidelity affects much more than just Depth of Field. It also affects shadow filtering, light radius, volumetric lights, and Ambient Occlusion.

Tip: For the love of god don’t use ambient occlusion as strong as the example I provided. Misuse of ambient occlusion can ruin a lot of renders. Tune it to how you want your poster to look, just like anything else in SFM.

Step 0: Launch Options

WOAH! Slow down there! We aren’t opening SFM just yet. Before launching SFM we need to get you some better launch options.

In order to change your launch options go to your steam library and find Source Filmmaker. Right click on it and select properties.

Next click the empty text box under LAUNCH OPTIONS. Copy and paste the following into that spot:
Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering

-nosteam -nop4 -sfm_shadowmapres 8192 -num_edicts 8192 -monitortexturesize 1024 -reflectiontexturesize 1024 +mat_envmapsize 256 +mat_forceaniso 16 +r_waterforceexpensive 1 +r_waterforcereflectentities 1 +mat_wateroverlaysize 1024 +r_hunka

Okay. NOW open SFM.

Step 1: Increasing the Sample Count

Right click the Viewport and select “Render Settings”
Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering

Change the “# Samples” to any value above 256. I highly recommend the full 1024.

After changing that value, click ok and select the clip editor in the timeline.
Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering

With the clip editor selected, wait for 10-30 seconds, and the image should already start looking significantly better.

If it takes any longer just know that a wait time like that is normal. It all depends on your GPU, the geometric complexity of your models, and the number of lights.

Tip: Source Filmmaker displays a sample counter in the bottom left.

Step 2: Increasing the “Quality”

For this step you need to have your camera in the Element Viewer. To do this right click on the camera animation set and select “Show in Element Viewer > Camera“.

When you select the element viewer tab, all the settings on your camera should now be listed.Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering

Change the highlighted setting to something above 10. I personally have it set to 15. This has the potential of significantly increasing render times on older hardware, so if you don’t think your computer is fast enough, stick to 10 or even something like 3.

After and “Conclusion”

Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering - After and
Congrats. Your poster is now only handicapped by your own skill and creativity.

 

Written by Stjames221

This is all for Source Filmmaker High Quality Rendering hope you enjoy the post. If you believe we forget or we should update the post please let us know via comment, we will try our best to fix how fast is possible! Have a great day!


Sours: https://steamsplay.com/source-filmmaker-high-quality-rendering/

Rendering sfm

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How to get a better render
Hi :) I'm looking for a way to get a "better looking" render than right now. My camera is set to 1024/256 but it still doesn't fit me, is there any software to use that would improve the render of a poster or an animation?
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Sours: https://steamcommunity.com/app/1840/discussions/0/2741975115067548855/
Exporting Tutorial SFM

Michael Lessing Presents

Source Filmmaker (SFM)

A Visual How-To

Now for the last step: rendering your image or animation. This is the easiest part of the entire process in terms of what to remember, though it is important to remember some of things I will be talking about.

Before we get to that, however, lets quickly look at the camera options, as this plays a big role in how the image will look in the final render.

First, we need to create a camera that we can animate. To do this, right click the animation set editor and select "Create Animation set for new camera." Alternatively, if you already have an active camera, you can go down to the small box on the bottom-right of the viewport, click the small arrow, and select "Create Animation Set." This turns the camera into a controllable entity.

With that done, lets look at what we can change. For one, you can animate the camera like you would a model, allowing you to make dynamic camera shots. You'll also see a short list of sliders next to the animation set editor. We only need to focus on two sets of sliders:

The Focal Distance and Aperture sliders control depth of field. When you slide the Focal slider, you will see a purple panel, which is what the camera will keep in focus when depth of field is applied. Aperture controls how much DoF there is; the more you slide to right, the more blur you get with DoF applied.

The AO sliders control Ambient Occlusion (AO). AO is the subtle shading between objects and edges, which can be found frequently in most modern games and CG films. These three sliders control the strength, radius, and amount of AO present on screen, so be sure to play around with them, as different lighting conditions will require different amounts of AO.

Alright! We have done all of the necessary things to start rendering your project! What we need to do now is go into the rendering options window. To do this, right click the viewport and select "Render Settings"

There are four options, but you only need to edit the first two, as the other two cannot be substantially changed: Depth of Field and Motion Blur. The DoF option controls the quality of the depth of field that we previously applied; the higher the number on the right, the better the quality. Keep in mind, this greatly influences the time it takes for the image or animation to render, especially on lower-grade computers.

The Motion Blur option controls the quality of the blur effect made by movement. This option is only neccessary with animations, but it can be used on images to create the feeling of movement:

Choose the options that you think will work for you. Remember that the options you choose will greatly influence rendering time, both on images and on videos. For example, if I were to render out a six second clip of this example with motion blur and DoF at the lowest settings, it would only take around 10-20 seconds. However, if I were to render the same clip at the settings I usually use (DoF 512, Motion Blur 128), the clip would take up to 6 minutes to render. It doesn't sound like a lot, but that's significantly higher than the render at low settings.

Now to start actually rendering the project. If you go up to file, you'll see the option "Export." From there, you'll see "animation" and "poster."

Both have different options, but they have the same object, that being a folder select. This shows where the image or animation will go when rendering is complete. By default, it will go into SFM's "sessions" folder, but if you click the "..." button, you'll open an explorer window that lets you select where the file will go, as well as give the file a name.

The export poster window only has a few options: a small box that lets you customize the size of the image (the image will always be at a 16:9 ratio, so the height/width will automatically adjust), and a box that lets you change the format of the image (SFM will always export a TGA image, but you can still export in PNG or JPEG).

The export animation window has a few extra options. It has the option to render at 720p, NTSC, or PAL, and to export in different formats, including GIF. Additionally, if you click on "More Options," you'll be able to access the rendering options and change them from there. Once you're satisfied with your settings on either the poster or animation window, just click on "Export" and SFM will do the rest!

And that's it! You have successfully made your first SFM project! You've taken the first step in becoming an SFM animator. But don't think this is all you can do. You can find additional tutorials for more advanced SFM tools, tips, and tricks all over Youtube. You can also find a plethora of useful resources on the official Steam Workshop, all of which are freely available for you to download and play around with. There is a whole world of possibilities with SFM, and this tutorial is only the beginning, so get out there and get started!

Sours: https://dtc-wsuv.org/mlessing16/narrative/rendering.html

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